When Robs Collide

Well now this is interesting.

Teaser: “Worlds Collide” Video Series with  Rob Leatham for Personal Defense Network, sponsored by Springfield Armory

Rob (Pincus) is not a fan of competition shooting as training for self-defense (to say the least) and Rob (Leatham), is a tremendous competition shooter and is an advocate for good pistol work first, no matter what the environment.

Actually, having trained with both Robs, I think there’ll be more overlap than most people realize. For all of Rob (Pincus)’s complaints about gaming, the pistol work he teaches in his classes is essentially what Brian Enos wrote about lo these many years ago, just applied to defensive training, not competition training.

When Brian was competing alongside Rob (Leatham).

If this means more acceptance of “gamer” techniques inside Rob (Pincus)’s very successful Combat Focus Shooting courses, good. Such a thing can only help the gun community as a whole, because it will help tactical guys make the shot on-demand, and it will open up competitions to a new crop of tactards competitors.

I kid. I jest.

I’m rather curious to see how this turns out. My philosophy, I believe, is more like Rob (Leatham)’s: There is shooting, and then there is everything else. All the form, all the moves, all the posturing in the world means SQUAT if you can’t hit the target on-demand when it’s needed the most.

To be honest, Rob (Pincus)’s comments about “choreographed” stages confuses me a bit. Sure, we make a plan when we go to a stage at a match, and if we’re really good (and lucky) we execute that plan as we imagined it. However, more often then not, we bobble a reload or take twice the rounds we were planning on to clear a plate rack or go ZOOMING past an open port and we have to re-think our plan right quickly, on the fly and in front of our friends.

I’ve shot the Figure-Eight drill that Rob (Pincus) talks about, and it’s a good drill. I’m also, if I might brag a bit, quite good at, because I’m used to things falling apart all around me while I have a gun in my hand, and the Figure Eight is all about making snap adjustments on-demand and shooting in an ever-changing environment. The Figure Eight is a good drill, but it is not preparing us for a chaotic event. Chaos happens when plans fall apart, not when there is no plan to begin with.

Which is exactly what happens on almost every stage of a match. It’s not the perfect execution of a stage plan that makes a competition shooter a better shooter under stress, it’s the ability to recover and execute a half-@ssed plan, on demand and under pressure, that makes competition shooters better shooters under stress. Every match, every stage, every time we step up to the line, SOMETHING changes, and we learn to adapt to the changing situation and come out ahead.

Bonus quote:

“The reason the American Army does so well in wartime, is that war is chaos, and the American Army practices it on a daily basis.”

– from a post-war debriefing of a German General