Drill, Baby Drill.

We’re used to the idea of drills and practice for street crime, like shooting from retention or the Tueller Drill. We’ve had 20+ years of concealed carry history in the U.S. that up until now has been focused pretty much 100% on street crime. Street crime will always be with us, but now we also need to acknowledge the reality of maybe having to deal with an active shooter as well.

Michael Bane’s comments about making the tough shot needed to stop an active shooter has got some people thinking.

Dont just be armed, be proficient in the gun you carry! I have been flayed alive for saying you should be able to make a 25-yard head shot and a 50-yard torso shot with your carry gun. I stand by that statement, and, in fact, double down on it. If you can’t make those shots with the gun you presently carry, change guns! Get the training.

Rich Grassi (no slouch with a sidearm) tries it with three different carry guns, with mixed results.

Lessons? Well, it’s not the size of the gun, it’s the familiarity with equipment. You’d best get that pistol zeroed – smart to do it for the load you’ll carry. Know how you need to see the sights to make that hit. The Ruger American Pistol is regulated to hit to the white dot on the front sight – at least this one is – and that’s a handy bit of information to have. Making a hit in a 4×4 box at 25 yards should be no chore for a gun like that. Likewise, going 2/3 in the “x” on the option with one more on the silhouette should be easy. It’s a failure of a firm enough grip – though I could use condensation on lenses as an excuse, it’s not a good one. Consider lighting in a movie theater, for example.

T.Rex Arms (insert joke about “specializing in small arms” here) did a similar drill, and I’m not sure about what what they’re showing here is a useful drill or not. The location of the bad guy is known, all that’s happening here is a turn-and-fire drill using a rifle shot as the start signal rather than a buzzer.

What’s needed (and it will happen, because we’re smart and, unlike our President, we see the need for such things), is something like the Tueller Drill* or the El Prez**, but adapted for the reality of a guy with a rifle in a semi-crowded, low-light, indoor setting. We need to simulate*** identifying the shooter and engaging him/her with your carry gun quickly and precisely. We call it the Tueller Drill because it’s based on real-world testing, so with that in mind, I’m thinking something along these lines as a test of our ability as armed civilians to react to an active shooter. I’m not a training expert and have no ego invested in this idea, I’m just flailing away like everybody else right now, trying to make sense of the incomprehensible.

Determine Baseline: Start facing downrange with rifle at low ready, eyes closed. Six targets 25 yards are set up downrange, each with a different color Post-It™ note on it. At start signal, RO calls out a color. Shooter engages that color with one round. Repeat 5 times for average par time. Ideally, the person doing the drill should not be a practiced competitor or expert shot, but rather, just an average gun owner. Sgt. Tueller didn’t do his tests with the BYU track team, and we’re not doing this with Seal Team Six.

This test is not meant to gauge how fast the bad guy can shoot people, but rather, how fast he/she recognizes that there is someone out there shooting back at him/her. The amount of time it takes for someone to pick out a gun at 25 yards is your window of opportunity to put your hits on-target and stop the threat. After that, you’re going to be behind the firepower curve and it’s probably going to go bad for you (or me). Assume you can draw, keep your gun out of view and move to a position of cover/concealment where you can shoot back: Can you engage a target with an upper torso hit in the time frame from that scenario? Can you do a head shot in that amount of time?

Me? I don’t know, but I’m going to try, and soon.


* Yes, I know, he never meant it as a drill.
** We may poo-poo it now, but fact is, the El Prez is/was the beginning of creating shooting drills based on real-world situations. Dismiss it at your own peril.
*** Simulate, not replicate. Drills are not scenarios, scenarios are not drills.

This Post Has 3 Comments

  1. Where I train with pistol we start each class with 25 yard shots on torso sized steel, in the middle of class we usually do drills hitting the head of an IPSC target at 25 yards. We will sometimes end the class with a walk-back drill where we will shoot that torso size steel again at 25, 50, 75, and 100 yards. I’ve yet to hit the steel at 100 yards, but many others that regularly train on this range do so routinely.

    It is most definitely doable and a desirable skill with a pistol.

    1. It’s do-able (We went out to 50+ yards in the Vogel Class, and I was shooting my carry P07), the question is, in what time frame, under what amount of pressure?

      Pinging 50 yard steel under Bullseye conditions is one thing. Under IPSC conditions is quite another.

  2. >> Simulate, not replicate. Drills are not scenarios, scenarios are not drills.

    “It is not a combat simulation, but simply a nerve exercise which tests various sorts of shooting skills.”
    Jeff Cooper on the El Presidente

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