Mind of No Mind

I’m in agreement with Gabe here, though I’ll take it one stop further than he does.

I use some that favor low stances and quick foot work, others that favor circular arm movements, and others that are quick and staccato in movement.

But I do them routinely, like I work dry-firing – the pistol kata – into my daily life.  From mindfulness comes mindlessness…and from a study of patterns comes freedom from patterns.

Thanks to competition, I don’t think about reloading under pressure, I just do it. Yes, I may not do them all the time with my head up in a state of tactical awareness all the time, but the mag goes into the gun quickly and smoothly and my sights are back on target right quickly. You learn in a match how to move quickly and safely with a gun in your hand. You learn what you need to see to get your hits on-target quickly and efficiently. You learn to deal with small amounts of stress so you’ll be able to deal with the stress of a gun fight.

Dry fire is kata. Matches are sparring. Gun fights are, well, gun fights.