Confidence. It’s What You REALLY Carry.

“If it isn’t on you when you need to fight, it ain’t your primary.”

– Tim Chandler.

I find no end of amusement in those who say, “YOU SHOULDN’T USE METRICS IN TRAINING BECAUSE FAILING A TEST DOESN’T IMPROVE A STUDENT’S CONFIDENCE !!1!” and then turn around and say “YOU STUDENTS SHOULD NOT USE THE GUNS YOU ACTUALLY CARRY EVERYDAY WHEN YOU COME TO MY CLASS!!!1! YOU NEED TO BUY A GLOCK 19 AND A KYDEX OWB HOLSTER RIGHT NOW OR YOU WILL BE KILLED ON DA STREETZ TOMORROW!!!1!”

Well, which is? If we are so concerned with people’s confidence in their abilities, why do we mock them when they show up to class with perfectly adequate guns like a Sig P238 or a S&W SD9VE instead of an FDE Glock? Are those *bad* guns? No, they’re not. Are they *great* guns?

Well, they’re not made by CZ, so no.

I kid, I jest. Mostly. But they are good enough guns.

I’m not sure how many trainers out there are aware that it is possible, VERY possible to take a class with a gun that isn’t a 1911 or a striker-fired, double-stack polymer 9mm.

I’m not sure how many trainers understand how useful a pistol that slips into your pocket and stays out of the way really is, and I’m certain that most trainers don’t understand how asking new gun owners to lug around a Glock 19 rather than something smaller is a big barrier to new gun owners.

You want to increase the confidence of new gun owners? Give them confidence in their ability to chose a firearm that fits THEIR lifestyle, rather than telling them which gun fits your lifestyle best.

 

This Post Has 3 Comments

  1. Well said. On the other side, if you decide to bring a low-capacity gun to a class not made for that, be so kind to bring a lot of mags as not to waste everyone’s time by asking for a break to fill up mags (yeah, I know, the course description said “at least three mags” and technically, you’re okay with 3x 6rds).

    For me, this has led to a strange-looking setup with a small gun in an AIWB holster, an additional AIWB mag carrier, both concealed under a shirt and a lot of OWB mag carriers and occasionally even a dump pouch.

  2. Now I really feel old. I recall a class I took over thirty-five years ago where the speed (or lack thereof) of reloading a revolver from drop pouches instead of a semi-automatic with magazines convinced me that I could be at a real disadvantage, never mind double action vs. striker fired or single stack vs. double stack magazines. Misses only got you to the reload point quicker. Eight rounds (or more) in a semi-automatic reloaded quickly, easily beat the six rounds in a revolver, even with a changeover to speed loaders instead of drop pouches. Then there is the problem of what to do if you only have the use of one hand.

    Bottom line – make what you have work as effectively as possible.

  3. I’m of two minds on this.

    I think the biggest reason why pocket pistols aren’t recommended for classes is that shooting 300-400 rounds out of them can be painful and exhausting in a way that shooting from a mid-sized pistol is not. That’s an important practical consideration for a class that you’re spending a fair amount of money on – if training is not enjoyable on some level, people won’t train.

    On the other hand, you’re 100% right on how useful those little guns are, and I think trainers really should try to figure out how to build a class around them. Maybe spend most of your time dry-firing, and limiting the round count to under 100 per day. Given the small magazines, that might not be as hard as it sounds.

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