Yet Again, I’m Ahead Of The Retail Curve.

Me, back in 2014:

“Without the in-person transfer of firearms at a licensed FFL dealer mandated by the 1968 Gun Control Act, the local gun store as we know it would not exist today.”

Ammoland, July 7th.

Retail locations are simply becoming showrooms for Internet sales. As a guy with a long history in retail sporting goods years ago, it all makes me seriously sad, and it bodes badly for the health of our currently free society when it comes to the Second Amendment and what that amendment really means for citizen freedom.

Ok, so it makes you sad. Sadness, however, is not a game plan to deal with change. If reality is messing with your business plan, don’t b!tch about reality, change your business plan.

And I disagree about the lack of retail being a bad thing for the Second Amendment. By the author’s own admission, the dramatic drop in the number of FFL’s in the U.S. happened way before the Internet upset the retail apple cart.

And speaking of apples, why is the Apple Store still going strong, when all other retail seems to be failing around them?

They have a fan base. There isn’t a store in the retail gun industry, brick and mortar or not, that has a fan base.

Want customers? Build fans.

Extra Bonus Idea For Your Consideration: Retail’s rise happened in an era of easy, accessible catalog shopping. Is retail really that vulnerable to online (or offline) catalog shopping, or is its rise and fall due to other issues?