The Applebees of Gun Stores.

Thinking a little more about this post (which seems to have struck a nerve), what happens when you walk into a gun store… what do you see?

You see a lot of guns. Guns just sitting there.

If the store has a hunting theme, you may see some taxidermy scattered about, and if it’s a more tactically-oriented store, maybe a poster for Glock or something.

When it comes to defensive pistols, especially for first-time gun owners, there is no context inside gun stores for how that gun integrates with your life.

None. Zero. Zip. Gun stores sell guns, but they offer no clues as to how they are to be used.

No wonder, then, that people treat them as a household god, and rely on the feeling of safety that their talisman of self-protection offers them. They do this because they don’t know any better, and we are not helping them learn how to go beyond “feeling” safe to actually BEING safe.

A quick suggestion.

I know sweet bugger all about wines. I know that there are some that are “dry” and some that are sweet, and I’ve had the experience of eating a good meal that’s been paired with a good wine and yes, it does make the meal more enjoyable and tasty.

Restaurants know this, and they also know they make a LOT of money on alcohol sales, which is why you’ll find that some mid-to-upper scale restaurants will try to increase their revenue by printing suggested wine and beer pairings on the menu beside each entree.

So why not give holster and gear recommendations right alongside the defensive pistols displayed on your shelves? Doesn’t have to be fancy, doesn’t have to be exotic, just something like “These pistols work great with (Name of Major-Label Holster Maker) holsters and (Major Ammo Maker) Brand Ammo”.

The customer wants to feel secure. Make them a little more secure by knowing that not only did they buy the right gun, they bought the right gear as well.