Allies and Morals.

Two interesting articles popped up on my radar over the weekend, both of which demand more than just a cursory link. First is the look at the full-spectrum tactics of the anti-gun left, over at Ace of Spaces.

The way spectrum of allies analysis works is: you categorize people and groups by where they stand in relation to you and your target on whatever issue you’re working on

Active opponents are against you, and fighting you.
Passive opponents are against you, but they’re not fighting you.
Neutrals are neither against or for you.
Passive allies are with you, but they’re not fighting for you.
Active allies are with you and are fighting for you.

The point of spectrum of allies analysis is figuring out who you can move one notch. Who can you move toward you? Who can you move away from your enemy? And how do you make sure you don’t push people away from you?

Active allies: engage them.
Passive allies: make them active.
Neutrals: inform or educate them to make them passive allies.
Passive opponents: make them move to neutral by worrying their position may cost them — BUT CAREFULLY, so they don’t become active opponents.

Quite frankly, gun owners suck at this sort of thing. We’re pretty good at identifying allies and opponents in the political arena, but our attempts to do this in the culture war is limited to Colion Noir and a concert at the NRA Convention and that’s about it.

This has to change. We need to learn how to win a culture war, not  just win an election

Secondly is this article by a self-confessed left wing gun nut (courtesy of David Yamane), which lays out the difference between gun owners and the gun control crowd clearer than anyone else I’ve seen before.

“Folks in the anti-gun camp tend to believe, with Martin Luther King Jr., that, ‘the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice’. The other camp sees history as cyclical, with no real long-term trajectory. We take it as self-evident that there is nothing new under the sun; human nature doesn’t change; and humans keep re-learning the same painful lessons as species. Ultimately, then, the private ownership of weapons of war is an issue that pits each side against its own hopes for the future. The anti-gun crowd finds itself arguing for the unassailable tactical superiority of the present neoliberal order, and the pro-gun crowd finds itself making the awful case that horrific deaths in the present are necessary to prevent a dystopian future that it fervently hopes will never come to pass.”

I have two sons. I want them to live a world that’s better than the one I lived in, but I also want them to live confident, secure lives. The neoliberal blue state model is collapsing, and one thing that always happens when cultures are in transition is that law and order breaks down, and people need to defend what’s near and dear to them by themselves, rather than wait for the .gov’s cavalry to arrive. It happened to the farmers in Gaul when Rome collapsed, it happened to the farmers in Bulgaria when the Holy Roman Empire collapsed, and it will happen here very soon as we find alternatives to our current progressive taxation/entitlement system of government.

And make no mistake: Progressivism is on it’s way out. But just because an animal is mortally wounded doesn’t mean it’s any less dangerous.

This Post Has 2 Comments

    1. I agree. There’s some stuff in there I *really* like, but the question I have is that while the author obviously believes in the “moral arc” of the universe, he also obviously believes that the only way to get to end of that arc is the current blue state model of progressive taxation and massive social spending.

      But what if it’s not? What if the moral arc of the universe demands that we shift individual power down from a massive federal nanny state to smaller units of government, even right down to the individual?

      Is our society still falling apart, or is it collapsing down to where it should be?

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