In Just Seven Days, I Can Make You A Man

A terrific post about student growth (and the lack thereof) inside the firearms training community.

“If there’s anything USPSA competition has shown me it is that those people who do better and who want to do better practice practice practice until their high-speed weapons manipulation skills under stress are superior to just about everybody who’s gone to a tactical school but never spent the time to actually practice those techniques that they paid so much money to learn.”

Shooting a practical pistol match USPSA or IDPA match means you have embraced the suck; that you understand that don’t know it all and are willing to demonstrate that lack of knowledge in front of your family and friends. Shooting a match means you know you need to improve, and more importantly, you are willing to take the time and effort to do so. Most people KNOW they need to lose weight or drink less or whatever, but they don’t actually DO it, because that requires effort.

There are ways to make that change less painful. Planet Fitness (and others) are set up so that you can do your exercises and see the results without joining jock culture, and Alcoholics Anonymous lets people find the sources of strength they need to kick a destructive habit.

When my wife’s students leave her middle-school math class each day, they have a homework assignment to do for the following day that will reinforce and expand upon what they previously learned in the classroom.

The list of firearms trainers who hand out drills when class is over which can be used by their students in order to reinforce and expand on what they learned in class is really short. The list of trainers who hand out drills that can be used on the ranges that their students typically have access to (Hint: not a pistol bay) is even shorter.

Giving your students a practice routine that is a) fun and b) something they can do on a regular basis and c) something they can practice without a radical outlay of time and/or money seems like a good way to keep your students coming back for more, and as a bonus, it’ll make them better shooters as well.

Win, win, win.