Back At It.

I received a job offer today, for the same salary I was making before, doing pretty much the same work I did before, but with the added possibility of a bonus if I drive in more revenue.
Thank you everyone for your kind words and support. They really, really REALLY made a difference.
And Bob, you were such a big help the last time I was laid off. I miss you brother, I really, really do.

A Gun For All Seasons.

Me, three years ago:

Modularity means more than just backstraps, it means being able to build my gun, my way. I REALLY like what SIG is doing with the 320, but I’d take it one step further and just sell the serialized trigger group by itself, with no pieces parts in it all, much like an AR-15 lower is sold today.

GhostGuns.com, this month.

GhostGuns.com is in the process of developing an 80% FCG that will allow buyers to build their own P320 compatible clones by drilling/milling a few pin holes and trigger sections. The entire process should be achievable with someone with average skills and tools.

So with one of these “80%” trigger packs and a bunch of parts from Apex, Gray Guns, SIG Sauer, etc, you’ll not only have a pistol, you’ll have a pistol that’s built to your specifications and is almost infinitely expandable.

Cool.

 

Whoops.

Went out of town yesterday, and to be honest, my mind’s been on other things, like getting a job.

Sorry.

Well Isn’t That Special.

Breach Bang and Clear has more on the “Tactical Operator = Instant Training Legend” phenomenon that’s popped up as of late, and it’s worth your while:

Who would you rather learn from? A guy who’s had his hands in peoples guts every day for 30 years? Or a guy who spent a couple of tours overseas dealing with guys that come fully stocked with all of the med gear you would ever need – on their person?

Quick question: Which sold better, the “Police Quest” series of video games, or “Call of Duty”?

If you’ve ever picked up a game controller in your life, you know the answer to that question. People these days didn’t grow up playing Cowboys and Indians or Cops and Robbers, they grew up blowing up (virtual) terrorists inside a video game.  On the range and in our training, we tend to want to emulate our heroes, and right now, our heroes are Delta Force, not 1-Adam-12. This, combined with the subtle (and not-so-subtle_ amount of “Walter Mitty-ism” to the gun training community*, means the SpecOps is going to the glamour industry for the foreseeable future.

Good, bad, indifferent, it just is.


* I mean, it’s not like it started out as cowboy “Quick Draw” competition, or something. Oh, wait.

One Shield, Two Shield.

I ordered a new Shield for me a couple of weeks before I got that bad news about my job, and it showed up the same day I got laid off.

Timing is everything.

I bought the new gun for two reasons: I’m pretty much all-in on using the Shield as my primary carry gun now, and the model I own has the manual safety on it. I’ve not flicked that sucker on (intentionally) the entire time I’ve owned it, but that doesn’t mean it can’t turn itself on, which might seriously affect my first-shot speed.

The plan is to (eventually) outfit the new gun with Trijcon HD XR Sights and either move my Streamlight TLR-6 over to the new gun, or buy a new holster for it (I’m leaning heavily towards a Comp-Tac CTAC right now) and keep the other one as backup / dry fire.

 

It’s Happened Again In London.

Don't hide. Fight.

In “1984”, Orwell talks about how the ultimate goal of Newspeak is to change the language and the culture so that the very idea of rebelling against the state is removed from people’s minds altogether. Britain (and indeed, all of Europe) has spent the last 50 years removing the idea that the people themselves can and should be in charge of their own security: The state is there to take care of you. Soldiers and police stand ready to do violence for you, you don’t need to worry about defending your life, that’s what government is for.

But what if that doesn’t work? What happens when we face a threat like this, which is designed to inflict as much violence on an unaware, unarmed and cowering populace so quickly and so brutally, the horror is accomplished before the call does out to central dispatch? It took eight minutes for UNARMED policemen to show up at the vehicle ramming / stabbing death of Fusilier Lee Rigby, and the armed cops who took out the attackers showed up fifteen minutes after the attack.

Fun fact: The human body usually bleeds out from a cut to a major artery in around 3 minutes, and it’s a matter of policy for paramedics not to treat the victims at the scene until it’s first been secured by the cops (Medics don’t like to get shot at. Go figure.).

My friend Erin Palette of Operation Blazing Sword said it better than just about anyone I know: Concealed carry is a herd immunity against crime. Want fewer victims of horrific terror attacks? Stop encouraging a culture of victimhood.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: There are two possible responses to the distributed threat of Islamic-backed terrorism: Clamping down hard on civil rights so you might catch the bad guys in the same net you throw over the general public, or a distributed, empowered response that can react faster than any agent of the state can.

London chose the first option, and it has not worked well. Whether or not they have the courage and trust in their citizenry to try the second option remains to be seen.  Chris Hernandez talks about the history and effectiveness of such attacks, Greg Ellifritz has some great info on what you and I can do right now to lessen our chances of being a victim in these situations, and my meager contributions are over at Ricochet.com.

Learn from this, and stay safe out there.

… And I’m Looking For A Job Again.

Which sucks, because I really liked where I was working, but they ran out of money to pay me, and so out the door I went.

If you know of a job for a content manager who’s never missed a deadline or someone who knows WordPress like the back of his head, drop me a note.

Alter Call.

Most evangelists suck at evangelizing. If you go to a “revival”, you’ll see that if anyone is walking forward for redemption, it’s probably who has already been in the church for years and years.

That’s great (and needed) but it’s not really increasing the numbers of people inside the church, it’s just lowering the amount of people who leave.

Now let’s apply that to gun culture. Who are the evangelists? Who are the ones bringing new people into the fold, and who are the ones who are preaching revival? Many people preach “revival” but in reality, they’re just delivering the same message to the same people in the same pews, and then when one or two of them walk down the aisle to be saved, they call it a new movement in gun ownership.

The best analogy I can come up with is the “Jesus People” movement of the early 70’s, when the hippies realized that hey, there might be something to that preacher-man stuff they heard as kids, and they tried to go back to church, but the church, seeing the long hair and… questionable grooming habits of the hippies (not to mention that heathen rock n roll they listened to) rejected them.

Now, four decades later, the church is on the outside of American culture, looking in.

Now let’s look at gun culture.

Today, we have millions and millions of people who want to “feel safe” and bought a gun, but they’ve not integrated that gun into their everyday life. That’s something that needs to change, or else gun rights will go away if those people don’t understand that it’s THEIR right to protect themselves that’s under attack, not someone else’s right to go into the woods and blast Bambi, or something (and the reverse is true as well).

Tens of millions of casual gun owners is nice. A million people who are dedicated to proficiency with their weapon of choice and are passionate about keep the right to keep and bear arms alive is even better.