Stand And Deliver… Sales.

Dear Acusport.

I love you. You know I do. You were our #1 vendor when I worked in the biz, and you have your @$#! together at a level that most other wholesalers only DREAM of having.

But.

You’re leaving cash on the table when it comes to accessories and weird special orders.

Special orders for a gun store are a nightmare. There is so much that can go wrong, and they take up so much time for so little profit. Researching the proper part number and then sending in an order for, say, a mag release button for a Glock 34 takes so much time,  a gun store will actually LOSE money on the sale, and if they say “We don’t do special orders,” they’ll lose the customer to Brownell’s or Midway.

Whether or not the customer has the time and willpower to navigate through those often-confusing sites is a topic for another day.

Instead of p!ssing off gun stores and customers alike, Acusport, why not turn yourself into the NFDN of gun parts, and set up in-store kiosks with all your stuff? Stores could set their own prices on their kiosks and then regulate which areas of your catalog they want to allow their customers to access. That way, if a customer comes in asking for all the weird stuff that customers ask for (but are a pain in the @$$ to stock), they can buy it at their local gun store and get it shipped right to them, and the gun store makes as much (or more) money off the process than they would have in the first place.

Oh, and as an added bonus, maybe have VOIP built into the shopping app (and a headset with video) so you can do the customer service as well. Net cost to you: A cheapo Android tablet and headset. Net benefit: More sales for you, and more sales for the gun stores who will have a steady stream of customers coming in to use the app.

You’re welcome.

Cajun Gun Works Does Nice Stuff.

Yes, they do take a while to do it, but they turn out really good stuff when they’re done.

I ran into an issue with my P-07 earlier this year: The firing pin in the darn thing wouldn’t pop primers, and I didn’t have a pistol so much as a lightweight polymer club. I had been wanting to change out the sights in it for a while, because the Meprolight night sights on it kinda sucked (the front sight is monstrous and fills up most of the rear notch, making precision shooting with it pretty much impossible. I wanted something that mimicked the same sight picture I got when I shot Bob Vogel’s gun last year, and Cajun Gun Works’ EZ/D sight set looked pretty much the same, so I decided to kill two birds with one FedEx box and send off my P07 to them for repair and new sights.

I’ll have to wait until the weekend to test how well the gun works now, but the new sights are terrific. Clear and precise, with is nice, deep sight rear notch that makes it easy to find the fiber-optic front sight.

CZ P07 Competition sights

Finding a good set of sights for this gun has been a challenge, as it is for any gun with a less-than-Glock market share, but if you’re looking for competition sights for your P-07, take a look at Cajun Gun Works EZ/D sights.

Security Theater.

Those of you who know me on social media know that I spent the weekend at two theme parks in the central Florida area. Both parks are “weapons-free zones” that have metal detectors and bag searches before you walk through the park gates, so surely you couldn’t get a gun or a knife through such air-tight security, right?

And if you believe that, I have a bridge in Gaza to sell you.

I waltzed through the security checkpoints both days with my cell phone, a Coast flashlight (neither of which raised any eyebrows) and my lightweight emergency tourniquet, which looks like the nylon coin purse it really is. I had my Boker knife in my wallet, and on the second day, I carried around the ABDO safe with me, and that passed right through the bag search at the park because it looks like a big ol’ cell phone case it’s meant to look like. I know that I can fit an LCP ][ and a spare mag into that case, which means that even in a non-permissive environment, I can carry a gun along with a cell phone, spare mag, flashlight and a knife, the four things I recommend for concealed carry EVERY day, and also had a tourniquet on me in case that was needed.

Keep in mind that I in no way recommend you do similar, because that might be construed as telling you how to subvert Florida’s gun laws, and that would be a BAD thing, so don’t do this.

Even though you can if you want to.

Trunk Club

There’s been some talk about trunk/truck guns in a Facebook group I belong to, and most of the comments have been against them, citing the risk of having your gun stolen vs. you actually using a gun in your trunk to defend a life.

I can dig it.

However, isn’t that also true of guns inside the home? Despite that, no one who’s serious about guns advises against safely having a gun in the home for self-defense. I also understand that the idea of a trunk gun carries a lot of baggage with it, namely the “I’ll run back to my car, suit up, stop the bad guy and save the day!” sort of thing, and God knows (literally!) how many people suffer from that delusion.

But.

It’s kinda nice knowing that I have something at home with a little more oomph behind it than just a pistol, and it’s nice to know that I have something with me on the road that will allow me to be my own roof Korean if (God forbid) I need to be.

Nothing Today, Kiddies

Sorry, but my phone took a nose-dive over the weekend, so all the time I would have spent coming up with great content was spent trying to restore my life phone instead.

See you tomorrow.

Definable, Verifiable, Logical, Repeatable.

MAG Qualifier

One of things I liked about my MAG40 class was that the Qualifier at the end of the class is based on police qualifiers from around the country, and the that your results on the test are documented by the instructor at the end of the class.

This may not seem like much, but if, God forbid, you do need to use a gun in defense of a life and are taken to court afterwards, wouldn’t it be nice to have some hard, verifiable data about how effective a marksman you are versus an instructor who shuns standardized testing testifying that you’re a pretty decent shooter.
Or something. Which is good, until opposing counsel produces THEIR expert witness who shreds the testimony of said instructor like it’s pulled pork at a Carolina barbecue.

Documented test results are not subject cross-examination. They stand on their own accord, and a mighty ally to have on your side during a courtroom cage match, and the CSI Effect can have a strong effect on juries.

This was one of the reasons why I shot the test with my carry gun and holster, not a competition gun. Could I have scored better with one of the CZ-75’s I shoot in USPSA Production? Sure. Do I carry that gun? Nope. Shooting this test with my carry gear helps me establish what my baseline is for street work. My baseline for pistol bay work is established by my USPSA and IDPA Classifier scores (which, to be truthful, need some help).

Gun Culture From The Inside Out.

As I’ve said before, I believe a big part of the growth in ‘Gun Culture 2.0″ has been driven by fear, either the fear of a President that will severely restrict the individual right to keep and bear arms, or the fear of antifa, $VAR Lives Matter or another one of the organized, terrorist-leaning forces out there.

To paraphrase Clint Smith, do I carry a gun because I’m afraid? Of course not! I’ve got a gun, and I know how and when to use it, so why should I be afraid?

While my lack of fear is based on good equipment and good training, the fact is, most people who buy a gun buy it and then bask in the false sense of security that having a household protection idol gun inside their home provides them. While you and I know that the sense of security that an unloaded gun under a bed (or similar) provides is a false sense of security, it’s important to remember that it appears very, very real to the people who have guns under their beds. You don’t know you’re actually on Mount Stupid until you find yourself falling off a cliff.

Fear is to be a poor motivator for post-CCW training from here on out. Can people be motivated by other emotions besides fear to get post-CCW training? Dunno. Can we? I hope so.

After Action Report: MAG40 At Safety Solutions Academy

“Front sight, crush grip and a smooth roll on the trigger is the last cheat sheet before the ultimate final exam.”
– Massad Ayoob

I was trying to define why I wanted to take this class, but I can’t do a better job than how my friend Tam described it, “A MAG40 class from Massad Ayoob,” she said, “is one of the stations of the cross for people seriously interested in developing their ability with the defensive pistol.” Massad has been writing about and teaching the defensive pistol for decades now, and he is THE person when it comes to dealing with the legal after-effects of using a pistol to defend your life. Let’s face it, we lost Rauch, we lost Cooper, we lost Cirillo and the number of trainers like Massad Ayoob, who have been there from the very start, is growing smaller with each passing year.
The class was hosted by Paul Carlson of Safety Solutions Academy. The range portion was taught at The Southington Hunt Club by David Maglio, a veteran law enforcement officer and senior instructor with the Massad Ayoob Group, and the classroom legal stuff was taught at a nearby hotel meeting room by Mas himself.

MAG20 Range Practice

The Range: MAG20 Live Fire

The first day started off with training safety, stances, grip… the usual stuff. I came into this class not expecting to learn something new during the range portion, but I was pleasantly surprised when I learned how to significantly improve my strong-hand only/weak-hand only shooting, something that’s eluded for me YEARS. The MAG20 qualifier is based on elements from various police qualification courses and to be honest, it’s not that hard. I was more handicapped by my out-of-date prescription lenses than I was by the course of fire. Nevertheless, I managed to shoot 96% on it with my tiny little S&W Shield, a feat that I am somewhat proud of.

The Classroom: MAG20 Armed Citizens Rules Of Engagement.

Let’s face it: 99% of what we know about how to defend ourselves in the courtroom after a defensive gun use comes from what Massad Ayoob has been teaching all these years, and I had heard much of it before. However, just because you’ve listened to a lot of rock and roll, it doesn’t mean you understand how good Chuck Berry really was, and Massad Ayoob is the Chuck Berry of defending the use of lethal force in self-defense inside the courtroom. The advice he gave out in class was simple, sound and is rooted in years and years of defending the legal use of self-defense in our nation’s courts. One thing that I learned in the MAG20 classroom made so much sense, I thought I’d share it here.
We’ve heard, over and over again, not to use hand-loaded ammunition in our self-defense guns, but what I never knew before this class was WHY.
The answer is quite simple: If (God forbid) we need to defend a life with our gun, our gun and the ammunition it contains will become evidence, and the court may need to replicate the circumstances surrounding our defensive gun use, up to and including shooting similar guns using similar ammunition to replicate the circumstances before, during and after we pulled the trigger.
With factory ammo, this is not a problem, as example rounds are kept of each case lot of ammo at the factory, but how do we replicate a hand load without the defendant (us) pulling the handle on the press? Could that be an issue in a defensive gun use that might invalidate evidence that would otherwise free us for the court’s grasp?

You bet it is.

I was also pleased that Massad’s comment about the influx of military trainers into the United States mirrors my own thoughts. As he put it, “A whole lot of the wartime rules of engagement do not apply to armed civilians and law enforcement inside the United States.” Not that there’s anything wrong with learning from someone who’s been in the military, but if, say, you take a course in Medieval Spanish literature, don’t be surprised when it doesn’t help you order up some food in a backstreet cantina in Hermosillo.
You may think that a class like this is something for the hard core student of the gun, but you’d be wrong. In our class of nine, there was one guy, Javier, who had never taken a firearms training class of any kind before in his life. His progression as a shooter over the two days on the range was a joy to watch, and he was hailed at the end of the class as the most-improved person in the class because, well, he was.
If Javier can do it, so can you, and that’s just one of the reasons why I’d recommend taking a MAG40.

Gimme A Sec.

Between the hectic pace of life these past few months and Monday’s devastating news, my heart just isn’t in it right now.

One of the things I talked with Paul Carlson about last weekend was the bitterness inside the firearms community. Yes, there are people out there whose purpose in life is to be used as reactor shielding, but other than that, there really is more that unites us rather than divides us. In talking with Paul on Saturday and Sunday, I realized that I had become that which I had most feared, I was one of the dividers, and I decided Sunday night to change how I treated people inside the business.

And then Monday happened, and my pettiness shone even brighter.

To quote the irreplaceable David Lee Roth, the trick to life is to not sweat the small stuff, and to realize that it’s all small stuff.

Enjoy life here while it lasts. It’s not going to happen again.

Goodbye, Bob.

Bob Owens

Bob, I wish you had talked with me before this. You were there when I needed a friend to pick me up during a dark, dark, time in my life, and now you’re gone.

I don’t understand this. This is the most un-Bob-like thing that I can possibly imagine you doing.

All I can say is, this wasn’t you. This was someone else inside you that did this, and I, along with hundreds and hundreds of other people, wish we could have stopped that other someone before this happened.

Bob’s family has set up a Go Fund Me page.

I suggest donating what you can, then donate a little more.

Bob was worth it.