Attention, Practical Shooting Organizations.

USPSA, IDPA, 3 Gun Nation, Rimfire Challenge, the whole lot of you.

Now is your chance.

The NFL is self-immolating itself, and the NBA and Major League Baseball are right behind them. They’ve decided that that 50% of the country shouldn’t be watching them play sports, so all of you have a great opportunity to step into the void.

How many of your top-level competitors are former military? How many are current law enforcement?

What are the odds that people who are ticked off by the shenanigans of the NFL would look up to the patriotism of such people?

Is there is a chance that 50% of the country might like to watch a sport where athletes are really and truly role models?

Get to work. You have until the NFL pre-season starts next year to make some hay off of this.

And if you need a hand getting it done, my email address is over there —>.

Building a Better, Quieter Mousetrap.

Maxim 50

Mere words cannot describe the geniusness of this product. It’s like a big, giant middle finger showed in the face to the National Firearms Act.

50-state-legal sound suppression is now a reality thanks to SilencerCo’s integrally-suppressed muzzleloader, the Maxim 50. No fingerprints, no pictures, no $200 tax stamp, no 4473, no wait. Mailed directly to your door. Even in California. Yes, really.

That scrunching noise you hear are knickers twisting en masse inside the offices of gun control groups all across this great land.

The fact that their ad campaign prominently shows the Golden Gate bridge and the Santa Monica pier is just rubbing it in. All that’s missing for Blue State Triple Yahtzee is a shot of someone holding one in Times Square and Michigan Avenue.

So, what’ll be the over/under on how soon Bloomberg and his minions talk about this as a “COMPLETELY SILENT .50 CALIBER LONG RANGE GHOST CLIP SNIPERS RIFLE IMMUNE TO MICROSTAMPING!!!1!!”?

Hint: Take the under.

Further proof that the gun industry treats stupid legislation as damage and routes around it.

Team Colors

Thinking a little more about this post from awhile ago, why are sponsored shooter jerseys so devoid of branding? Sig did a decent job with their team, but other than that, you have the blue and black S&W jerseys which look totally different than the blue and black Taran Tactical jerseys which look nothing like the blue and black Mossberg jerseys…

You get the point.

Part of the reason is that there are very few shooters sponsored by just one company: Rob Leatham shoots for Springfield and Julie Golob for S&W, yet they are both part of Team Safariland.

No, I don’t get that either.

Maybe manufacturers would get better results from their sponsorship efforts into better, more eye-catching jerseys, rather than getting lost in see of look-alike templates.

Kinda Want.

I’m interested.

The EXO ONE (X01) is a patent-pending multi-caliber exoskeleton for the Sig Sauer® P320 Fire Control Unit (FCU) and adjacent firearm components including barrel, slide assembly, and magazine release. This transformation happens in moments without tools and is fully reversible.

FCU != Florida Central University

I’m a sucker for Personal Defense Weapons, and this looks like an interesting application of the modularity that makes the P320 so cool into the PDW market space.

Colt got left behind the minute the M4 lower made it out into the open market, and maybe this will serve as a wakeup call to SIG that when it comes to the P320, they are in the fire control unit business, not necessarily the pistol business.

Still Don’t Go To Shows

I wrote this almost six years ago, and it’s still true today.

I am just not into gun shows. Don’t know if I ever will be. I’m not really into guns as objects, I’m into guns as tools, and ever since I got my eight guns, I’ve been buying stuff either as backup to what I already own or to compete in specific competitions.

But buying guns because they’re guns? Nah, not really.

This is not really a surprise. I never collected cameras when I was a shooter, and I never bought the latest, greatest gear either. My medium format was a 25 year old ‘Blad, and my 35mm’s were FM2’s and a FG’s, not an F4.

If it works, use it.

Marko posted this on Facebook awhile back, and it reminds me just how long it’s been since I read “The Book Of Five Rings“.

“You should not have any special fondness for a particular weapon, or anything else, for that matter. Too much is the same as not enough. Without imitating anyone else, you should have as much weaponry as suits you.”

― Miyamoto Musashi, The Book of Five Rings

The First Step Is The One That Counts.

I noticed something interesting during my too-brief time behind the gun counter: Elderly people would shy away from even mid-sized guns like the Glock 19 and LC9, and immediately assume that smaller guns like the SIG P238 and Ruger LCP would be easier for them to handle. The feeling in their minds was that smaller guns = smaller recoil, which is, of course, not the case.

Not by a long shot.

The other thing I noticed was their reaction to failing to perform the (apparently) simple task of cycling the slide.

Think about it: What’s the first thing that any (competent) gun store clerk does when pulling a gun out of the case? They drop the mag (if there is one) and cycle the action to prove that the gun is unloaded (Rule 1!) and then hand it to the customer. We do it so often, it’s like breathing to us, and we make it look like it’s a super-easy task to perform.

But what if, for reasons of age and/or upper body strength, it’s not a super-easy task to perform? All of a sudden, a basic task that signals the start of using a gun is an impossible thing to perform, which creates doubts in the person’s mind… if I can’t do THAT, what else can I not do?

Yes, this seems silly to those of us who shoot a lot and can cycle a slide in our sleep, but I assure you, it’s really, and it sold a LOT of P238’s, a small gun that is (relatively) easy to shoot and very easy to cycle.

iPhone Guns, iPad Guns.

Thinking more about yesterday’s post, I upgrade my phone almost every two years like clockwork, because I rely on it to run my life. From photos to movie-watching to games to writing, it’s pretty much my go-to device when I’m not at work. Why? Well, to borrow from Stephen Miller, in today’s world, if you can’t do it on your phone, it doesn’t matter.

But my iPad? My iPad is for media consumption and games, not work. It’s, oh, five years old, at least, and beat to crap.

How many consumers have an iPad of guns, and how many have iPhones? How many people have something that they use only on occasion and never carry with them them, versus something that’s an essential part of their lives?

How do we convince people that their iPad needs to become an iPhone?

The Unkillable Cow

Glock comes out with the Gen 5.
S&W comes out with M&P 2.0.
Springfield now has Grip Zone™.

You could toss all of these into a giant bingo drum, give it a whirl, and when you picked one out, you’d have a terrific gun that will be reliable and shoot great for decades to come. They all are debugged technology and have no major surprises, because the pace of innovation in guns is (currently) the pace of mechanical innovation, not electronic innovation. Moore’s Law does NOT apply to the gun world: The effectiveness of our guns is not doubling every two years. The last big leaps in pistols were the wide-spread adoption of polymer striker-fired guns and bonded hollow-core ammunition. Actual innovation is pretty much at a standstill right now, because the product development of guns is achingly slow compared to the product development of chips or software.

Pistols are (at least for Glock and Springfield) a cash cow: They’re how they keep the lights on and the doors open. Gun companies do small changes between models because that’s all they CAN do. A pistol is as complicated as rock compared to, say, an iPhone, and they’re ain’t a lot of upgrades you can do a rock*. I just got a new iPhone**, just like I do pretty much every two years, as the features on the new phones like more memory and better cameras really appeal to me.

My camera? I still shoot with a D70 I bought in 2005. Yes, I could upgrade to a D750, but why? The D70 kicks out great shots and still works great. I don’t make my living tripping the shutter anymore, and it’s all I need for the photos I’m taking right now. Yes, I could probably also use a small point and shoot or a mirrorless DSLR for some of the pictures I take, but since the camera and apps in my iPhone are up to the task, why bother?

Think that the slowdown in the gun industry right now is due, in part, to consumers having bought enough gun to do the things they need a gun to do (or believe that they need it to do) and don’t see a need to upgrade or get another gun?

Me too.


* “Grip Zone” jokes in 3…2…1…
** Yes, I know the iPhone 8 is coming out. I had to get one now because my current phone went Tango-Uniform, and quite honestly, the (leaked) features of the iPhone 8 don’t appeal that much to me.

Ruger LCPII 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 837 – 937

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge

No photos of the target today, because my phone decided to lock up in the 95° Florida heat. It’s a shame because I concentrated on shooting for groups this time out, and the LCP][ responded with 2″ five-shot groups from 7 yards. Not bad for a little gun with essentially no sights and a very short sight radius.

I finished up the session with 30 or so rounds shot from retention, right up against the target then shooting while backing up as fast as I can, kinda like what Craig Douglas is doing here.

Kinda.

Because I tend to shoot on indoor ranges or at matches, where shooting from retention is rarely mandated, I actually have very little experience with it. Yes, that’s a training scar, and yes, I’m trying to do something about it.

Other than that, the little LCP][ just soldiered on. I was struck again just how easy it is to shoot strong hand only: There really is little for the support hand to do on the gun, and because it’s lightweight with a decent trigger, it really doesn’t need a support hand to get a quick round off and onto the target. I did have one Failure To Feed on round 36 out of 100 while shooting PMC Bronze.

Rounds Fired : 100
70 Rounds PMC Bronze
30 Rounds Winchester FMJ White Box

2000 Round Challenge Results
Total Rounds Fired: 937.
One possible failure to eject on round 116, two failures to eject on rounds 400 and 489, one failure to feed round 873.