The Vacuum Speaks For Itself

The Vacuum Speaks For Itself

Greg’s not wrong… there are a lot of flaws in this article, one of the very first things that I wrote for Shooting Illustrated.

But.

It’s also the #1 article in the history of Shooting Illustrated, and by a ridiculous amount (as in 10x the traffic of anything else they’ve posted, ever), because at the time, it was one of the first articles out there to say that maybe, just maybe, a .38 with pink grips isn’t the best gun for a women. That article flew around social media, and I honestly can’t tell you how many women commented with “Thank you! I’ve been waiting for years for someone to write an article like this!”

Now, was my methodology off and were those gun choices very flawed? Yeah, probably. I was new to the gun writing game, and those guns were the guns I had access to at the time. If I were to do it again, I’d add in some caveats about the carry gun, and toss in a G19 or the like.

However, five years after it was published, there STILL isn’t another article out there which covers women choosing their own guns, but yet I can find hundreds of articles on the best way to transition from your AR to a pistol.

Seems to me we have our priorities mixed up a bit…

Colt 2000 .45 ACP 1911 2000 Round Challenge – Rounds 1796 – 2005

Colt 2000 .45 ACP 1911 2000 Round Challenge – Rounds 1796 – 2005

Okay, first the bad news: The Colt Competition that I’m torture-testing really crapped the bed on this outing, with four Failures To Feed with Federal 230 grain JHPs in the first 100 rounds.

But a thought hit me: I’ve not cleaned the magazines on this gun in over a  thousand rounds, and we all know that the magazines are a big choke point with the 1911 platform, and a dirty magazine might just have something to do with a gun failing to feed. To test out this theory, I shot the gun for the next 50 rounds using the mags that shipped with the gun, mags that I’ve used only for Barney-ing up the gun before a stage, and it went the next 125 rounds without a hitch.

Colt Competition 1911

Now that the test is over, it’s time to refurbish this gun and tune it to my specifications, so I’ll be sending it up to KGB Customs to have some work done on it. First up will be new springs pretty much everywhere and I’ll also be checkering on the front strap to give me a better grip. I have a literal boxful of 1911 parts from STI and other manufacturers like hammers and triggers and other parts which I’ve won off of shooting match tables that I’ll send up with the gun as well, just in case they’re needed. Sights-wise, I’m actually quite happy with the Novaks on the gun, so those won’t change, and the grips are also quite good, but I’ll probably add a magwell for faster reloads.

Overall, I’m very happy with the 1911 as a platform and this gun in particular. To be honest, if it weren’t for the word “Competition” in its name and the legal hassles that would come along with that name inside of a courtroom, I’d be 100% confident in using it as a daily carry gun. There are those who say that day of the 1911 has passed. I’m not one of them: I think the 1911 has more than a few years left in it, and I’m looking forward to shooting this gun for years to come.

Colt Competition 2000 Round Challenge

Rounds Fired:
200 Rounds American Eagle 230 Grain FMJ
20 Rounds Hornady 200 Grain XTP JHP

Results:

2005 Rounds Fired
One Double Feed, Round #1347 (Remington UMC)
One Failure To Feed, Round #1568 (MagTech Defender)
One Failure To Feed, Round #1574 (MagTech Defender)
Three Failures To Feed, Rounds #1820, #1863, #1894 (American Eagle FMJ)

Site Launch

Site Launch

If you’re a firearms trainer or a student, check out ShootingClasses.com.

One of the big frustrations for me here in SW Florida has been finding out about great training opportunities AFTER they happened, and ShootingClasses.com fills that gap.

Also, it serves the purpose that TrainMeAZ was designed to serve, namely, a single resource for people who want to learn how to stop embarrassing themselves on the range.

Go check them out.

Flash Site Pictures.

Flash Site Pictures.

Mike Janich is coming to South Florida. If you want to avoid being stabbed and learn how to use a blade as a defensive weapon, start with his class.

I did a review of the Daniel Defense DDM4 VP7 pistol in .300BLK with a LAW folding brace.

How far are you willing to go to support “your side” when a culture war heats up?

Speaking of which, if this doesn’t chill you to the bone, brother, you are already dead.

I agree with Greg: There really is no reason to carry something other than a SOF-T or CAT tourniquet. I carried a SWAT for awhile, but the fact is, it’s no less bulky than a SOF-T is, so you might as well carry something that’s documented to work.

Bon Voyage.

Bon Voyage.

On a recent Safety Solutions podcast, Claude Werner, the Tactical Professor, said that firearms training is not an event, it’s a journey.

He’s right.

But it’s getting people to go on that journey that’s the hard part, because unless they are absolutely forced to so, people don’t like to go on journeys that are not fun. My family and I will gladly travel up to Orlando for two hours in order to go to a theme park, but we are not willing to travel two hours to go eat broccoli.

And I like broccoli.

Also, first impressions matter. I have friends who are seriously into shooting practical pistol competitions, but their first foray into self-defense training was way too “tacticool” and serious for their comfort zone, and they’ve shied away from that area ever since, even though they are great shots and carry a gun on a regular basis.

Making sure the first steps are fun is the key to lifelong learning. Ever watch a preschool teacher? How much of what he/she is teaching involves actual teaching, and how much of what they do is getting their students excited about learning?

That’s why events like Shoot N Scoots are so important. By emphasizing the fun of practical shooting and how you can be safe with a gun on your hip, students think that training and competitions are just as fun as going to the local range and shooting with your friends.

And, of course, it is. We just forget about it from time to time.

However, if the first steps in the journey are difficult and confusing, the student is going to think that the rest of the journey is as horrid. As a result, they’ll put “get more gun training” in the same bucket as “work out more often” and “eat less sugar”… things that we know we SHOULD do, but just don’t see any reason to do so right now.

Want a lifestyle of concealed carry? Make people EAGER to join your classes. Make them not only see a need for training, but also make them feel good about choosing to train with you.

How Does This Gun Make You Feel?

How Does This Gun Make You Feel?

Getting people to live their lives armed means teaching them about an armed lifestyle. Moreover than than that, the lifestyle that we’re teaching has to Be FUN. Yes, we can (and do) encourage people to eat better and exercise by using dire warnings about heart disease and obesity, but the those appeals come down to the simple fact that you will lead a better life if you do such things. Yes, the journey involves a lot of work, but it’s sold as a destination, and that destination is a healthier, happier, life. In other words, eat your broccoli and work out, so you can go to the beach and not look like a beached whale in bathing suit when you do so.

Look at how other lifestyle products are marketed: When’s the last time you saw a TV ad for a family car which rattled off a list of features? TV ads for family cars are all about how people use them and how your family life will be once you buy that car. Beer marketing is all about having good times with your friends as you drink together.

There are exceptions to the rule: Subaru has been all about safety since Day One, and Michelob Ultra and Miller Lite have made low carbs/low calories a cornerstone of their marketing, but both of those are about feeling safety and having good health as part of your lifestyle.

How are we integrating fun and good times into firearms training? Is that even a priority? I agree 100% with Tom Givens in that every round we shoot in practice should have a purpose behind it, but here’s the thing: Most gun owners don’t see a gun as something they need to practice with, they see shooting a gun as a fun, recreational activity to be enjoyed with family and friends.

More on this tomorrow.

Product Review: MagGuts Ruger LCP +1 Magazine Follower

Product Review: MagGuts Ruger LCP +1 Magazine Follower

I’ve carried around a compact .380 for over ten years now, and I’m pretty comfortable with what they can and can’t do. One of the more obvious things they can’t do is shoot a lot of bullets without reloading. The magazine in my old P3AT held seven rounds and my LCP2 holds just six, and while both have a higher capacity than a five shot .38 snubbie, no one ever complained they had too many bullets in their gun after the firefight was over.

I had good luck with MagGuts products in my Shield: Their +1 follower for that gun installed quickly and easily and is proving to be reliable in that gun, so I thought I’d give their version for the LCP2 a try as well.

The MagGuts +1 Follower for the LCP2 is slightly different than the one for the Shield: Rather than a one-piece spring, the +1 follower for the LCP2 magazine has a two-piece spring, with a flat ribbon spring that nestles into a pocket into the top spring, and then that fits into the bottom of the new, slimmer follower for your magazine.

MagGuts +1 Follower

I installed that top spring the wrong way on my first try and couldn’t fit the as-promised seven rounds into my magazine (whoops), but the people at MagGuts quickly set me straight, and yes, seven rounds can fit into a standard LCP2 magazine.

On the range, shooting a mixture of PMC 90 grain FMJ and Hornady XTP JHPs. The follower worked fine for the first 50 or so rounds, and then things started to get a little… weird. Over the course of 150 rounds, I had three failures to extract, and the gun did not lock back of several occasions.

Now granted, the LCP2 isn’t the most rock-solid reliable gun on the planet, but still, one failure every 50 rounds gives me pause. With that failure rate, this is just not something I’m willing to carry on a full-time basis, especially since Ruger now makes a seven-round magazine for LCP2.

Rob Pincus Is Right.

Rob Pincus Is Right.

“Let’s go talk to ‘they’. Let’s go influence the culture outside of this room, and that starts with influencing the culture inside of this room.”

Gun owners need to learn to switch from being ideologically-based to being inclusive.

Inclusivity doesn’t mean giving up your standards, rather, it means finding as many people as you can who agree with your goals, and bringing them into the fold. It means finding fellow travelers on the road to personal security, and marching alongside side in order to support THEIR cause as well as ours.

Black Guns Matter, Pink Pistols and the plethora of woman’s shooting groups out there are just one of the ways to do that, and they’re working: We are peeling away bits and pieces of the monolithic anti-gun juggernaut, but more is always needed.

I’m tired to fighting battles to keep the our innate right of armed self-protection: I want a world where the idea of taking away the right of self-protection is laughed out of polite society like chemtrails are. I want people who believe in the insane idea that a disarmed populace is somehow a safer populace treated with the same skepticism as UFO conspiracists. I want “gun control” to be so toxic, only the most wacked-out, flaky politicians in Washington are talking about it.

Why? Well, to borrow a phrase from every concealed carry class everywhere, the best (2nd Amendment) battles are the ones we don’t have to fight. Let’s stop fighting battles, and get on with the business of winning the war.

Flash Site Pictures

Flash Site Pictures

Some great tips for maximizing your time on an indoor range.

Police lives matter. So does my life.

Top Six Gun Store Pet Peeves. Stocking ammo is a tough call… you have to carry every kind of ammo there is, or carry nothing. But the website thing? Oh yeah.

I apologize for nothing.

Seven essential accessories for your new defensive pistol.

Hey, Gun Culture 1.0… Now that you’ve realized that you need to grow, here’s how you do it.

What’s wrong with 3 Gun, and how to fix it.