I’m In.

Armed Parents

What should pop up in my social media feed right after I finished those last two rants but the news that Melody Lauer is bringing her Armed Parenting Class to Homestead Training Center in December of this year.

I’m in. I am SO in. I’ve been fascinated about this class from the moment I heard about it, for two reasons:

  1. The name of the course is *Contextual* Handgun. Think about that for a second… most (if not all) handgun training takes place in a context-free environment where we students are forced to adapt what we learn to our own lives. The instructor talks about presentation from a holster and post-engagement scan and assess and blah blah blah and then we students have to figure out what may or may not work for us.
    And let’s face it: If I was a single guy in the my late 20’s with no family, the threats that I might face and my reasons for defending myself or others would be quite different than they are now, with a wife and two young sons. If the reasons why were buying guns these days isn’t just “It’s a gun, and I can,” it makes sense to create training classes that are more than just “it’s a gun, here’s how you shoot it,” and yet nobody is doing that.
  2. People who I know and trust (and Bob Owens as well) have taken this course, and they’ve raved about it.

Really looking forward to this.

*Your Ad Here*

Mondrian Cycling TeamFirearms-related companies seem absolutely addicted to sponsoring practical shooters as a means of marketing themselves, and a big part of that, for some insane reason or another, is having the shooter where a jersey to a match with the sponsor’s name on it somewhere, in the hopes that other shooters will see the sponsor’s logo and buy the sponsor’s products.

But have you SEEN the shirts more shooters wear? Can you tell, at a glance, who gives the shooter the most amount of support? No? Then why are the spending the $$$ to sponsor a shooter? Taran Tactical and S&W do a good job of branding their shooters, as did the late, great FN USA and Sig Sauer shooting teams, but other than that, what is there? I’m not asking for something as distinctive as the Lotus 72 (aka the John Player Special and probably the prettiest car ever to race on any track, anywhere), but how can a sponsored shooter stand out from the crowd (and provide more value to his/her sponsors) if all they’re doing is taking the same shirt templates that everyone else is using and slapping slightly different logos onto them?

Look, it’s not hard. Cycling teams have been doing this for over a century now, with some pretty tremendous results like the Mondrian-inspired jersey that’s shownin this post. All it takes is a little effort, a little more money and a desire to stand out from the crowd. Sadly, without that last one, no one will attempt the other two, and that’s why sponsored shooter jerseys will continue to all look the same.

Buzz Guns.

Buzzfeed, that bastion of liberal muckracking, goes to Taran Tactical in an attempt to re-create that iconic Keanu Reeves 3 Gun run with a couple of regular joes.

What’s expected to happen next, doesn’t. They actually do a fair, even-handed report, and also manage to toss in a few talking points about how guns are the ultimate in women empowerment and how insanely fun it is to shoot 3 Gun.

More of this, please. Much more. This is what guns becoming part of lifesyle should look like.

A Good Knife.

To be honest, I will never understand people who leave the house without a knife, phone and a flashlight. Unless you work in a non-permissive environment like behind TSA lines or in a school, it only makes sense to carry around a sharp edge, along with some way of seeing in the dark and a means of communicating beyond yelling at the top of your lungs.

Oh, and a lighter would also be a good idea as well, because being able to start a fire is never not handy.

Part of the problem is, when people say “I want a good knife,” we recommend a tactical folder to them or a confusing mulittool when all they really wanted was something cheap and pointy.

Enter the Opinel folding knife. I got turned on to these almost thirty years ago by a knife-loving friend of mine, and I’ve tried to keep one nearby as often as I could.

opinel_1

The Opinel knife has changed very little since it was introduced almost 100 years ago. It has a simple, twist-lock design that keeps it closed when not needed or when it’s open, and that’s about it. It’s not the easiest knife in the world to open (it usually takes me both hands to open mine), but what it does, it does very, very well.

opinel_2

The blade is sharp. DANG sharp, and the handle fits comfortable in your hand. If you’re looking for a cheap, everyday utility knife, skip the cheap Chinese imports and go with something that’s been around for a hundred years.

Switching My Daily Carry

Ruger LCP II

At this point, with almost 400 rounds through it with nary a hiccup, I’m confident enough in the LCP II to carry it on days when I have to be more discreet than usual. Also, based on the results from this test and feedback from people whom I know and trust, I’m switching from Hornady 90 grain XTP’s to Hornady 90 grain Critical Defense ammo in my .380’s. The Critical Defense round was the only round to penetrate more than 12 inches of gel AND expand each and every round that was tested.

Look for more rounds downrange with the LCP II in the near future.

“Half The Store Is Devoted To Solutions”.

“Because people don’t just want to buy personal computers anymore, they want to know what they can do with them.”

This. This is how Apple took over the world. They realized, faster than Microsoft did, that computers were not something we used just at the office, they were becoming part of our lives.

Apple did this, and now they own the retail world.

Who is devoting half of their gun store to HOW you use a gun? Anyone?

Why not?

Is there anything, anything at all inside your gun store that gives hints about what you can DO with your guns, now that you’ve bought one?

Why not?

Dance With The Person Who Brought You To The Dance.

Nice to see one of the icons of mainstream, establishment conservatism notice the role that the NRA played in defeating Hillary Clinton.

There are many claimants to the honor of having nudged Donald Trump over the top in the presidential election. But the folks with the best case are the National Rifle Association and the consultants who made their TV ads.

The NRA did just about everything right. It endorsed Trump last May when he was still just the de facto nominee. The goal was to persuade Second Amendment supporters who’d backed other candidates to unify behind him.

The NRA planned ahead. It had lined up TV time months beforehand when rates were lower. That saved money. Thus when the Access Hollywood tape threatened to capsize the Trump campaign a month before the election, the NRA had cash on hand for a fresh ad to steady Trump.

Good to see Freddy (“The Beadle“) Barnes saying something that I’ve been saying (literally) for years, that gun owners are the new evangelicals.

October, 2015:

“The NRA is not going away anytime soon, but their political role is changing. Thirty years ago, the Republicans relied on a “three-legged stool” of support from foreign policy hawks, small-government activists, and social conservatives. Of those three, it was the social conservatives who did the dirty work of knocking on doors and getting out voters to the polls on voting day. Since then, however, the power of social conservatives inside and outside of the Republican Party has waned, and it’s now gun owners and NRA members who get out the vote for their candidate of choice.”

October, 2016

We’re in a presidential election where one of the candidates is proud that the National Rifle Association and others opposes her efforts to change the meaning of the Second Amendment and impose the “Australian model” of gun control on the US.

American gun owners are, for the most part, allied against Hillary’s attempts to move the right of self-defense from an individual right to a duty that belongs to the state. We’re mobilized, and we’re spreading the word about what responsible gun ownership looks like.

We’re winning. The gun-control fever has broken, at least on a national scale. Let’s get back to healthy, safe gun ownership as the norm in American life, and leave civilian disarmament on the ash heap of history where it belongs.