… And All That Jazz

… And All That Jazz

I’ve been thinking a bit about what makes a “lifestyle of guns” recently, and I realized once again that there’s really nothing you can add on to Gun Culture 2.0 to make it into a lifestyle.

With the hunting that was/is central to Gun Culture 1.0, there was all the stuff associated with going into the outdoors in attempt to blast Bambi or one of his woodland friends into oblivion. Tents, flashlights, camp stoves… you name it, you needed it to go out into the woods. Heck, even I splurged for a pair of snake-resistant boots for my hunting trip.

But for Gun Culture 2.0, there is really else to buy to make it a lifestyle, because it’s all about integrating guns into our current lifestyle rather than building an idyllic vision of the countryside that smacks of Rosseau (with guns).

When I go shoot a match, aside from my guns and ammo, I use pretty much the same gear (car, gas, etc) I use to go grocery shopping. The same is true when I travel for a class: Aside from the guns, I might as well be going on a business trip.

This is really going to hinder any attempts to non-gun sponsorship money into Gun Culture 2.0, because why should Miller Lite spend their ad buck with Daniel Defense when they could spend it with NASCAR?

Now, there are exceptions to this rule. Brownells is teaming up with a UFC fighter, and that makes a lot of sense. More is needed though.

Colt 2000 .45 ACP 1911 2000 Round Challenge – Rounds 1401 – 1595

Colt 2000 .45 ACP 1911 2000 Round Challenge – Rounds 1401 – 1595

So first, the bad news: The Colt Competition 1911 choked on two rounds of MagTech +P 165gr First Defense ammo, with two FTF’s out of the 20 rounds I shot.

Ick.

I also had some issues again with the 1911 not going into battery after a shot, but those went away when I gripped the gun tighter, so I am putting those me, not the gun.

Most of the ammo in this test was shot at the weekly practical pistol match at Louland, where once again I won Single Stack (mostly because I was the only one shooting Single Stack), and the rest was during some practice drills at a friend of mine’s backyard range.

Now, the good news. I shot a clean Dot Torture with the gun, and qualified as Expert (!) in CDP on the IDPA 5×5 Drill with a cumulative score of 25.82.

Colt 1911 CDP Classifier

Yes, there a couple of iffy hits on that Dot Torture target, but if you look at how the IDPA target is held up with wire sign stands, there was a wind blowing the day I shot that drill and it blew the target back on more than a few shots. With a more-solid target stand, there’d be a lot more one-hole groups on that target.

Classifying as Expert in CDP kinda blew me away… I’ve never shot that Classifier before, so to hit that plateau on my first try, with a gun that I’ve been shooting for less than a year, is kinda cool. What’s even more interesting is that I had two shots on Stage 2 when the pistol didn’t go into battery on me (my fault), so I could have shot it even faster…

Colt Competition 2000 Round Challenge

Rounds Fired:
150 Rounds Remington UMC 230 Grain FMJ
20 Rounds Magtech 165 gr +P SCHP First Defense
25 Rounds Remington Golden Saber

Results:

1595 Rounds Fired
One Double Feed, Round #1347
One Failure To Feed, Round #1568
One Failure To Feed, Round #1574

 

Hmmn, This Could Be Interesting.

Hmmn, This Could Be Interesting.

ShootingClasses.com bills itself as “Online Class Management For Instructors.” In the email that they sent me after I signed up, they describe their site as:

Guided by industry expertise and instructor feedback, ShootingClasses.com is an online system that simplifies the administrative side of the teaching process for instructors, helps students find an instructor in their area and even allows range owners to connect with instructors and students.

Interesting idea. I’ve been batting around doing something similar, as there is no “one stop shop” for finding out about new training opportunities in any given area (I found out about the SouthNarc and Vogel classes near me by accident), so someplace that lists all opportunities in a given area would be really useful.

Plus there’s the whole registration thing, where people are using a mishmash of EventBrite and WordPress plugins and all kinds of other stuff to sign up people online. This site might solve a bunch of problems at once.

Project ULTRA

Project ULTRA

In addition to being a gun nut, I’m a bit of a theme park / roller coaster nerd, so when something like this pops up that combines those two worlds, it piques my interest.

What happens when you attempt to create a living world, 100% immersed in the theme of a fictional universe? A world in which both employees and guests are encouraged to live and dress the part 24-hours a day? Before too long the world will find out.

To take that once step beyond, what happens when gun tourism goes full special operator, and you have something like The Jack Ryan Experience combined with a nice hotel that goes full Taran Butler / John Wick?

 

Product Review: SouthOrd Lock Pick Set.

Product Review: SouthOrd Lock Pick Set.

A few weeks ago, LockPick World contacted and asked if I wanted to review some of the products they offer.

Now, you have to understand that for me, lock pick sets are forbidden fruit. Growing up in Canada, lock pick sets were COMPLETELY off limits, along with shuriken* and pepper spray.

No, I don’t get that either.

Despite this, I grew up reading the exploits of Raffles and The Stainless Steel Rat, and because of this, lock picking was a skill I really wanted to acquire. And so when Lockpick World made their generous offer**, I jumped at the chance.

I know the basics of picking a lock: One tool (the pick) puts tension on the lock, and another, the rake, pokes and prods the tumbler pins until they fall into place and the lock pops open, but I’ve never had the chance to put them into practice until now. Fortunately for me, LockPick World was kind enough to also send over a practice lock with the SouthOrd pick set they sent over, so I could put my technically-legal (but kinda shady) skills into practice.

And it was FUN! I was able to pop open the practice lock in under a half-hour on my first try, and now I’m moving on to simple locks like luggage locks and smaller padlocks. I’m watching “how-to” videos on YouTube, and I’m taking a few moments every week to calm my nerves and practice the delicate art of theoretical larceny.

Now, will I put these new skills to some ill use? Of course not. Is it a handy trick to know? Well, I’ve had more than one friend open up his car with a pick set after leaving his keys inside, so yeah, this skill comes it handy.

Thanks to LockPick World for opening up the world of the amateur cracksman to me.

 

* And yet throwing knives are completely legal up there. Think there’s an anti-Asian bias to the weapons laws of Canada? I do.
** What part of “sent me product for review” is hard to understand here, FCC?

What Do You Do With A Problem Like Gun Owners?

What Do You Do With A Problem Like Gun Owners?

Extending out the gay rights analogy that I’ve used before, how much of the bigotry against gays in the 80’s* was based on the fear of AIDS? People thought that to drink from a glass that a gay person drunk from was instant death, and that’s not even mentioning the irrational fear that AIDS would transfer over en masse to the straight community.

So people were shunning a minority based on a irrational, superstitious fear that just being around that minority might cause them to die.

Why does that sound so familiar….


* Having gay friends and straight friends in the 80’s was rather sad in some ways because I knew people in my circle of friends who would have gotten along great with each other, had it not been for the fact that one was gay and one couldn’t handle that fact. It was sad to watch people intentionally lead a smaller life, just because they couldn’t conquer their prejudices.

Context Matters

Context Matters

I hate Deagles, but I know they’re a hoot to shoot.

I don’t own a Glock, but I know they’re a good gun to start with.

I know Glocks are good guns to start with, but I wouldn’t recommend one to someone whose hands have been weakened by arthritis or age.

Context matters. There is no “one size fits all” solution for sodas, (that’s why they make Pepsi, Coke and RC) and there’s no perfect carry gun for everyone, everywhere. There are reasons why maroons like myself prefer Macs over Windows, why people use Linux over Macs and why people choose something other than a Glock 19 for their first gun. Some of them might be bad reasons (dumb advice from gun store clerks or supposedly knowledgable friends), some might be good reasons, such as it was for me, when I found I was demonstrably more accurate with a CZ75 starting out than I was with a Glock 17.

Chesterson’s fence applies to a lot of things, and the gun community would be a better place if we heeded its lesson more often.

One Trick Pony.

One Trick Pony.

Michael Bane made an interesting comment about Tam’s post about the Taurus Spectrum, mentioning how the Walkman was, in some ways, the progenitor of the iPhone.

Which made me remember that the Walkman was the beginning of the personal media revolution we know live in. The introduction of Walkman was the first time that we could decide what music we ourselves could listen to at any given moment in the day, The Walkman begat the iPod which turned out to be an evolutionary dead end: Even Apple doesn’t make them anymore. It was a dead end because it could really only do one thing, play music. Even though the iPod could carry around thousands and thousands of songs, in the end, it wasn’t enough to compete against the next big thing, which was the iPhone and streaming music services.

The iPhone, on the other hand, is still continuing to grow and expand because it CAN grow and expand. Thanks to the App Store and iOS, you can make your iPhone into just about anything you want it to be.

Guns are iPods: they do only one thing. This isn’t a bad thing, though. After all, Apple’s “digital hub strategy” was built around one-use gadgets like the iPods and digital video cameras, and it resurrected the company and made them gazillions of dollars.

This is where we’re trying to get to right now with guns: We need a “security hub” strategy, where we integrate the unitasker (guns) along with all the other elements of personal security into our lives and the lives of the people around us and turn ourselves into our own first responders.

However, what made Apple’s digital hub strategy obsolete was another Apple product, the iPhone. The iPhone took all of those disparate tasks performed by separate devices and compressed them into one easy to carry device, which meant you didn’t need a computer at the center of your digital life anymore.

We’re not at that stage yet. Heck, we’re not even at the stage were Walkmans guns are a common sight in our society.

Colt Competition .45 ACP 1911 2000 Round Challenge – Rounds 1251 -1400

Colt Competition .45 ACP 1911 2000 Round Challenge – Rounds 1251 -1400

… so we had our first legitimate problem with the Colt Competition 1911, a double-feed on round 1347 while shooting the weekly steel match at Louland.

The good news is, I took first place in Single Stack. The bad news is, I was the only one shooting Single Stack.

Kinda disappointing that we couldn’t go all the way to 2000 rounds without a hitch with this gun, but honestly, one problem in 1300+ rounds, with a 1911 that costs under $1000?

Not bad. Let’s see what the other 600 rounds look like.

Colt Competition 2000 Round Challenge

Rounds Fired:
150 Rounds Remington UMC 230 Grain FMJ

Results:

1400 Rounds Fired
One Double Feed, Round #1347