Flash Site Pictures

Flash Site Pictures

I did the writeup on the Beretta APX Compact for Shooting Illustrated. It’s, um, a compact 9mm striker pistol that feels great and shoots great. As I said before, it’s really, really hard to buy a lousy gun these days: Pretty much everything you can buy new in your local gun shop will do the job, and do it well.

Speaking of Beretta, I wrote something for them on what to do before you take a concealed carry class.

I don’t feel particularly under-gunned when I carry my .380ACP LCP2. Can I successfully shoot a Bane Drill with it? No. Is it an ineffective defensive tool? Also no.

You carry a tourniquet? Great! Do you practice deploying it under less-than-ideal conditions? No? Well, here’s a few simple drills to help with that.

Thanks to the tribalization that’s powered by a global communications network, we are rapidly approaching a post-Westphalian model for government. It shouldn’t surprise us, then, that a lot of tribes are very nasty indeed.

Think that the police are standing by to use cutting-edge tactics and gear to save you from an active shooter? Think again.

Some really, really good tips on surviving a “grid down” situation in an urban environment from someone who is going through a bout of homelessness right now. Bottom line is, want to avoid being prey? Then don’t hang out where the predators are.

Rob Pincus Is Right.

Rob Pincus Is Right.

“Let’s go talk to ‘they’. Let’s go influence the culture outside of this room, and that starts with influencing the culture inside of this room.”

Gun owners need to learn to switch from being ideologically-based to being inclusive.

Inclusivity doesn’t mean giving up your standards, rather, it means finding as many people as you can who agree with your goals, and bringing them into the fold. It means finding fellow travelers on the road to personal security, and marching alongside side in order to support THEIR cause as well as ours.

Black Guns Matter, Pink Pistols and the plethora of woman’s shooting groups out there are just one of the ways to do that, and they’re working: We are peeling away bits and pieces of the monolithic anti-gun juggernaut, but more is always needed.

I’m tired to fighting battles to keep the our innate right of armed self-protection: I want a world where the idea of taking away the right of self-protection is laughed out of polite society like chemtrails are. I want people who believe in the insane idea that a disarmed populace is somehow a safer populace treated with the same skepticism as UFO conspiracists. I want “gun control” to be so toxic, only the most wacked-out, flaky politicians in Washington are talking about it.

Why? Well, to borrow a phrase from every concealed carry class everywhere, the best (2nd Amendment) battles are the ones we don’t have to fight. Let’s stop fighting battles, and get on with the business of winning the war.

What Aren’t You Talking About?

What Aren’t You Talking About?

You may notice that I haven’t been talking about my CZs much as of late.

There’s a reason for that.

I took the P07 to TacCon so I could shoot Ernest Langdon’s DA/SA class with it, and I did quite well, shooting a 299/300 in the match. However, since then, I have sucked the suck out of suck with that gun. It got so bad, I reached the point that I couldn’t even shoot a clean Dot Torture drill with it at three yards.

In other words, I sucked.

Now the thing is, I didn’t suck at SHOOTING… I managed an Expert on a run thru the 5×5 Qualifier with my 1911, so the skills were there, I just couldn’t translate those skills onto the P07.

Why was this happening?

Good question.

Usually with a DA/SA gun, it’s that loooong and heavy Double Action first pull that kills your accuracy.

Not me. It was the second trigger pull, the lighter, shorter pull that was doing me in. I was/am doing a lot of dry fire with that gun, and my finger was getting used to an 8lb pull trigger pull with every shot, so when I shot the gun for real and that second shot WASN’T 8 pounds, but rather a shade over 4 pounds, whoosh, there went my shot, low and left.

The cure?

Shooting the P07 with live ammo, and paying CLOSE attention to how my front sight was moving as pulled the trigger on both my DA and my SA shots (thanks, Jeff!).

I shot the pistol in the weekly steel match at Louland, and I did pretty well, scoring above my average on a number of stages.

But when it came to re-shoot the NRA Instructor Qual, I choked. Again. To make matters worse, in practicing with my Shield afterwards, I passed.

This makes no sense. The single-action trigger on the P07 is MILES better than the Apex trigger in my Shield, and the sights on my P07 are set up to be really easy to shoot accurately.

And yet, I suck with that gun when the pressure is on. This tells me that the problem is in my head, and that it’s going to take a lot of practice to get it out of there.

Flash Site Pictures

Flash Site Pictures

Some great tips for maximizing your time on an indoor range.

Police lives matter. So does my life.

Top Six Gun Store Pet Peeves. Stocking ammo is a tough call… you have to carry every kind of ammo there is, or carry nothing. But the website thing? Oh yeah.

I apologize for nothing.

Seven essential accessories for your new defensive pistol.

Hey, Gun Culture 1.0… Now that you’ve realized that you need to grow, here’s how you do it.

What’s wrong with 3 Gun, and how to fix it.

Priorities.

Priorities.

So Tam’s post about how flashlights (and other lights too) are really, really handy for keeping out of legal trouble got me thinking…

If you told me to prioritize all the gear I have on me day in, day out, from most-important to least important, it would look like this.

Phone
Because the modern smartphone can do so many things and because communication is so vital, that’s my #1 thing to carry every day.

A Bright Flashlight
Look, there is just no excuse not to have at least 100 lumens on you at any given moment. There’s just not, not when a Streamlight Microstream or Coast HP1 are so cheap, and Li-Ion batteries can be used to goose up their output even more.

Knife
A folding knife is just too useful not to carry. Are they the most effective self-defensive blade out there? Sorta. There’s other options, though, that we’ll get to later.

OC Spray
Need something that’s in-between harsh language and lethal force? Well, here it is! The number of times that a blast of spicy treats is the solution to your problems far, FAR outweighs the number of times that 124gr hollow points solve the problem.

Tourniquet / Trauma kit
I’ve seen exactly one gunshot victim in my life, but I’ve been the 1st person on the scene of at least a half-dozen horrendous car wrecks. Carry a tourniquet, because the life you save may be your own.

Pistol
Carrying a gun to make you “feel safe” is like carrying a guitar to make you feel like a musician. If you carry, know how to use your gun, and know when you can and can’t use it to defend a life.

Centerline Knife
ECQC and this knife defence class both taught me that deploying a folding knife in a close quarters tussle will be theoretical at best. I carry an SOG Mini Instinct on my belt, but I’m looking around for alternatives.

Spare Ammo
John Corriea says that after watching 10,000 gunfights, he’s never seen a civilian have to reload. Pretty much the only reason I carry a spare mag is because my Shield holds 9+1; when I carry my PO7, I really don’t need more than the 16+1 rounds it brings to the fight.

“I Just Want To Say ‘Good Luck, We’re All Counting On You’.”

“I Just Want To Say ‘Good Luck, We’re All Counting On You’.”

I’ll never forget the complete and utter feeling of helplessness I had, years and years ago, when we walked out of the hospital with the eight-pound bundle of cute stuffed into a car seat that was our first child.

“WHAT THE HELL DO WE DO NOW????” was the only thing that was going through our minds as we drove home. Yes, the hospital gave us a two-hour lecture on how to raise a kid and yes, I had already changed a couple of diapers and had been spit up on a few times, but neither of us had any clue about how to raise up another human being.

Fortunately for my wife and I, we had grandparents who knew what do, and guided us along the way to where we are now, with two healthy teenaged boys in the house. It was their previous experience and wisdom that allowed us to make good choices about how to we would perform the full-time job of raising our sons.

Now pause for a second.

Years ago, in my first CCW class, I had about two hours of hands-on training on how to shoot a gun, and even that amount wasn’t required to get a permit in Arizona. I was lucky: Because I shot at one of the best ranges in the country, there were people there that could and would help me undertake the full-time job of carrying a firearm. I was fortunate, but most people aren’t, and as such, the vast majority of people who get a concealed carry permit never carry their guns on a regular basis… They were never taught how to do it every single day.

You don’t raise a child on the days that you think you FEEL you should raise a child… you do it every day, whether you feel like it or not.

And you don’t carry a gun to protect your children on the days that you FEEL you should carry one… you do it every day, whether you feel like it or not.

Flash Site Pictures.

Flash Site Pictures.

I reviewed the Walther PPQ SC for Shooting Illustrated. It’s honestly hard to review guns these days, because it’s hard to find something wrong with guns these days. We are in a golden age of guns, which is great if you’re a consumer, but sucks if you’re looking to write a spicy review.

Oh, and I also channeled my inner Claude Werner and wrote an article on practicing at an indoor range.

I’ve carried concealed in an Inside-The-Waistband holster since Day One, so carrying in an Outside-The-Waistband holster took some getting used to, but I can see why people like it.

Speaking of Claude Werner, he’s got a great look at what’s really important for armed citizens.

Walmart is getting into the premium outdoor gear market. If they’re smart, they’ll learn from the mistakes that Dick’s have made and sell the sort of guns (AR-15s) they won’t sell in their big box stores.

How good is good enough? B Class USPSA, ish. Which is almost where I am, and that’s pretty cool.

You know what? 995 yards is a very, very long ways away.

Can You Keep A Secret?

Can You Keep A Secret?

Here’s the deal: About two months ago, my wallet flew out of my pocket while on a roller coaster at SeaWorld. The good news is, it’s probably at the bottom of a lake somewhere, so at worst, there is a ‘gator out there that is stealing my identity, but the bad news is, my entire life was in that wallet. My driver’s license, my Social Security Card, my Green Card and my concealed carry permit.

Now, to be fair, I.C.E. and the Florida DMV have actually been fairly amazing: I got my driver’s license back in a matter of minutes, and green card (while expensive to replace) was sent to me in a just a few weeks.

My concealed carry permit, on the other hand, took two months to replace.

Why? Is it REALLY that more involved a process to replace a state permit to carry a gun than it is a federal permit that says I can live here permanently? And why did it take me 15 minutes to replace one state permit (my driver’s license) but 86,400 minutes to replace another?

Get on the ball, Tallahassee. This sort of thing is embarrassing.

In the meantime, not having my permit meant I couldn’t carry a weapon. The pistol obviously falls under this restriction, and Florida’s carry laws are so vague, I wasn’t sure about my centerline knife either (heck, even my auto-opener was on the bubble).

Not no more. While it feels good to walk around with all my accoutrements in-place once more, the fact of the matter is a) I live in a really quiet, well-upholstered section of God’s Waiting Room, so my chances of a stupid thing happening to me are quiet small to begin and b) I’m to the point that I can spot the potential for a stupid thing to happen LONG before it actually occurs.

But still, it’s nice to have all my options with me once more.

Narrative Matters.

Narrative Matters.

First off, pretty much every single firearms trainer out there needs to watch this short video on how to give a presentation.

It’s given by Garr Reynolds, who makes his living helping the world’s biggest companies do better presentations, and it got me thinking…

I’ve mentioned this before, but when I took my CCW class many years ago, my teacher told me that only one in three of us would take the steps needed to make concealed carry a regular part of our life.

Firearms trainers are pretty good at teaching technique, where we suck, however, is helping people live a new lifestyle. This is because we approach concealed carry as a thing to be learned, not a life to be led.

Duh.

Make your course about how their lives will change for the better. Mix in some fear because it is a scary world, after all, but give them a reason to WANT to carry their guns, rather than a fear that they need to carry them or they’ll die.

Don’t just survive, but thrive.

Minimalist Training.

Minimalist Training.

My current job is a casual dress environment, so for the first time since I started carrying on a regular basis, I’m NOT pocket-carrying a .380 four days out of seven, I’m carrying something more substantial pretty much all the time.

Do I feel more safe now that I have more firepower with me? No, not really. I know what each of the guns I carry on a regular basis is and is not capable of, and I adjust my worldview accordingly. We preach that it’s not the tools, it’s the training and mindset, then we tell people that if they don’t carry at least a Glock 19, they’re not taking things seriously.

But.

I think some of that reaction is actually “If you show up to my training class with anything less than a Glock 19, you’re not taking things seriously,” and there’s an element of truth to that. Taking classes with a tiny 9mm or less sucks: I accept the fact that I am not going to win the coin or find myself $5 richer. All humility aside, though, I shoot my Shield well enough to take it to a good class, and as a result, I get training that is 100% relative to what I carry.

However, for the average schmoe, unless it’s one of Claude’s or Chuck’s classes on pocket guns or something similar, showing up to train with a snubbie is an invitation to a lot of frustration.

So what needs to change? The standards for what a “responsible” gun owner should carry, or the training that teaches them to be responsible?