NRA Annual Meeting, Day One

Or, eight hours on the floor, and I *swear* I haven’t been drinking yet.

A little more on the Springfield XD-E… The gun is surprisingly ergonomic, even though it looks like a shrunken-head HiPoint. The trigger is not the best DA/SA trigger I’ve felt, in fact, it was quite bad. The single action was felt heavier than the 4-5 pounds they said it was, and the double action was long, heavy and had noticable stacking.

Taurus T4SA

Taurus, throwing caution to the wind, came out with an AR-15.

An AR-15 with a $1199 MRSP.

Honestly, they’re not bad guns. THe T4SA has Cerakoating, Melonite barrels and bolt carrier groups, is lightweight (6.5lbs), and has Magpul gear all over. Not bad, and a step up above the usual entry-level AR-15.

Speaking of firearms manufacturers from the Florida with a reputation for low-cost guns, Sccy has finally come out with their CPX-3, a not-quite pocket gun in .380 ACP. I had a bad history with the first-generation Sccy, but since then, they’ve got their act together, the CPX-2 has been a great little inexpensive gun. One thing that impressed with me with the CPX-3 was how stupendously easy to rack it was. While the trigger on the CPX-3 was a still a Sccy trigger and there for long and heavy (8-10 pounds), it was smooth, even and didn’t stack. This would be my “go-to” recommendation for someone older who wanted a gun for self-protection and was worried about manipulating the gun into action.

Lastly, let’s talk about The Fix from Q, a bolt-action gun that set the world on fire when it was introducted at SHOT earlier this year.

All I can say is… believe the hype. The gun is AMAZINGLY light, the bolt feels terrific and the trigger is great.

If only they made a model for those of us who shoot left-handed.

This Was The Gun That CZ Was Supposed To Make, But Springfield Did Instead.

Springfield has come out with a DA/SA subcompact. The problem is, this was the gun that I told CZ to make.

In a world where a seven pound pull and a break not unlike a staple gun is considered great and long ten-pound DAO triggers are not unheard of, a polymer gun with a nine-pound first pull / five pound second would become a shooter’s best friend. Team that up with a spring system that allows for easy slide manipulation and the ergonomics you’re already known for, CZ, and you’d take over the market.

I’ll have more once I get to fondle it on the floor today, but my first impression is, that is one mother-ugly gun. It looks like someone hand-washed a Hi-Point and it up and shrunk on them.

Springfield’s Coming Out With Something New At NRA

’bout time.

From their press release:

Attendees will be the first to see an all-new Springfield Armory® pistol platform at the upcoming 2017 National Rifle Association Annual Meeting and Expo when convention hall doors open at 9 a.m., Friday, April 28, 2017.

Now, the company is poised to offer the next major addition to its broad and diverse handgun family. Designed to offer specific benefits that solve persistent handgun user challenges, the new platform brings a unique set of features that enhance usability and ease of operation.

Thanks Springfield, that told us absolutely NOTHING about what you’re coming out with at NRA. Fortunately, they did include a video, with some guy named Leatham, who I hear is a pretty good shooter or something.

Judging by the video above and screen captures below, it appears to be a small, thin, 1911 style pistol with a fiber optic front sight, Novak-style rear sight and a rail of some sort. Recoil seems feisty, so it may be chambered in 9mm or even .45, rather than .380ACP

Reports of a grip zone remained unconfirmed at this time.

Anyways, I’ll be looking at it at NRA, as will a number of other people, I suppose.

New Springfield 1911

Introducing a new springfield

Girls, Girls… You’re BOTH Pretty!

The USCCA* has been doing a pretty good job of racking up memberships and exposure as of late, and their “Concealed Carry Expo” is pretty much all Gun Culture 2.0, all the time, while at the NRA Annual Meeting, you’ll see farm equipment and whatnot mixed in with all the gun stuff.

And then this happens.

The United States Concealed Carry Association (USCCA) today announced that the National Rifle Association (NRA) has disinvited the organization from its 2017 Annual Meetings & Exhibits and the 2018 Great American Outdoor Show because of “concerns regarding its programs.”

The move shocked the leadership of the USCCA because they were given less than two weeks notice that they had been banned from the annual show, even though they had attended for the past several years. This decision also came as a surprise because over the past two months, the leadership from the NRA and the USCCA met twice to discuss the shared goal of the two organizations in support of the Second Amendment.

To be honest, I’m a little disappointed in the NRA’s actions. I’m not the biggest fan of the USCCA’s marketing, as it’s a little too frantic for my tastes, but this is not the way to go. If the NRA is losing ground to the USCCA in the training and concealed carry insurance areas, the way to beat them isn’t to ban them, it’s come out with better products. I’m also wondering if this is partially the outcome of the high-profile of the NRA-ILA as of late. When people think “NRA”, the think “Gun Lobby”, not “Guys who do great training (or not)” or “Wow, I like their insurance plan!”. If people see you as a one trick-pony, that opens up space for another horse in the race **.


* Just so you know, I make a little bit of cash off both the USCCA and the NRA from the links on this blog.
** Is that a tortured metaphor or what? I’ll leave it be, because I don’t want to beat a dead horse…

Concealed Carry Needs An On-Ramp

Or at least, a better on-ramp than what we have now. We say “Carry your guns, people, it’s a lighter burden than regret!” and then we do nothing to actually help people get used to carrying a gun.

We ask them to run a marathon, without teaching how to prepare for a marathon.

Fortunately, there’s at least one training team that’s doing something about that problem, and their model could change “Gun Culture 2.0” forever.

Go check them out at Ricochet.com.

A Very Personal Gun Free Zone

We gun owners are so funny. We moan and b!tch about “gun free zones”, and yet we do little, if anything, to help the people who bought all those guns over the last few years do anything about carrying said guns with them them every day, thus eliminating the “gun free zones” within their own lives.

I talk more about the utter lack of an on-ramp in-between buying a pistol, getting your concealed carry permit and actually carrying the darn thing around with you on a day-in, day-out basis over at Ricochet.com.

Go check it out.

 

Ruger LCP II 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 384 – 446

I spent some more quality time with the LCP ][, getting used to using it as a carry gun. I concentrated on doing Tueller drills with it, from the pocket, with and without my hand on the gun, and mixing in a few Mozambiques as well.

I was kinda happy that I was consitently able to get off two shots into the Down Zero area within 2.5 seconds with my hand out of my pocket, and 1.5 seconds with my hand on the gun in my pocket.

I’ll take it.

As for the test itself, I shot a bunch of Lucky Gunner’s ammo (and you should shoot their ammo too), and I encountered one Failure To Feed on the 400th round, shooting PMC Bronze.

Rounds Fired : 62
50 Rounds PMC Bronze
12 Rounds Hornady Critical Defense

Total Rounds Fired: 484. One possible failure to feed on round 116, one failure to feed, round 400.

There Is No Such Thing As The United States Of America When It Comes To Guns.

Spend a few minutes reading this post from David Yamane on who is usually guns to commit violence in America, and who is not. It’s well worth your time. Here’s a brief sample:

Taking an aggregate statistic like this, we often hear about how much higher the homicide rate is in the United States than other “similar” countries.

But there is a problem with such population averages: they gloss over important differences between subpopulations within the United States. For example, according to “Firearms Injuries in the United States,” the firearm homicide rate for those 25-34 is more than four times greater than the rate for those 55-64 (8.01 vs. 1.47). The rate for men is 6.13 and for women 1.15. The rate for non-Hispanic Blacks is 14.78 compared to 0.99 for non-Hispanic Asian/Pacific Islanders.

Of course, these differences in subpopulations are related also to economics, and economics are closely related to residence in the United States. As I have argued previously, the problem with averages is that no one lives in “The United States.”

And it gets better from there. Go read it all.

Drunk Uncle

THis is a problem for YOU to deal with.

As I said, a long, long time ago, one of the reasons why I got into this armed self-protecting thing was because my wife’s cousin, a man with a history of drug abuse and a previous conviction for manslaughter, started to take what I thought was an uncomfortable amount of interest her whereabouts and what she was doing.

He did the world a favor and offed himself soon after that, but it woke me up to the fact that there are people who cannot be avoided or reasoned with, and that means I was left with violence as a way to get them out of our lives.

It also made me realize that a potential threat to my family’s well-being existed inside the confines of our extended family. We go around pre-visualizing “black swan” events like the mugger in the ski mask jumping out and yelling “GIMMEYOURMONEY!”, when the reality is, we probably need to worry about people we already know as our attacker, be it the guy who snaps at work or the drunk, angry uncle or something similar.

Thankfully, you and I are probably not going to have to one-shot a terrorist on a rampage or take on an active shooter. But an out-of-control relative or close friend? Maybe.

It’s one thing to walk around the street pie-ing corners because of the knockout game, and another to act calm and friendly around a creepy co-worker or (in my case) a felonious cousin. How often do we run through scenarios that involve de-escalation and de-assing ourselves rather than concealment and cover? How much of our mindset is devoted to impossible scenarios, and how much to the possible?