Maybe I Was Wrong After All

Maybe I was wrong after all

I wanted to go up to the range and run through my practice drills, but the near-freezing temperatures in Phoenix last week talked me out of it. Instead, ExurbanSteve and I went to Caswell’s and shot on their indoor range, and ended up I working on my strong hand and weak hand only shooting. 

I also wanted to see if there was a noticeable difference in accuracy and controllability between my compact (-ish) 9mm CZ P07, my subcompact Sccy 9mm and my .380 Kel-Tec P3AT. The range rules at Caswell’s don’t allow me to draw from a holster, so instead I ran through three Mozambique drills each from low ready with each gun. 

And son of a gun, but the little 9mm Sccy was significantly harder to control and less accurate than the even-littler (but less powerful) P3AT, even though the sights on the P3AT are, at best, limited (actually, “pitiful” would be the word I’d use). 

I won’t know until I get out on the range, shoot from a holster and time my runs, but my first impression is that if you’re looking for a compact, easily concealable CCW gun, skip the subcompact 9mm and get a pocket .380. 

The Blessings Of The Itty Bitty 9

The Blessings of the Itty Bitty 9

Sccy CPX-1

Shelley at Gun Nuts Media ain’t a big fan of the new ultracompact single-stack 9mm’s coming on to the marketplace

I can dig it. They do seem like a solution in search of a problem. They’re pushing the boundaries of what could be considered a “pocket pistol”, but don’t offer the control and accuracy of a compact or subcompact 9mm. 

But. 

I consider the ultra-compact 9mm to be the “scout rifle” of CCW. No, they are not as concealable as a pocket .380, and no, they are not as powerful as a .45 and no, they are not as accurate as a compact 9mm like a Glock 26 or a Springfield XD-M. 

However, a small single-stack 9mm is 85% of all those guns. Just like a scout rifle is the rifle to have if you can have only one, a single-stack 9mm allows you to carry your gun in the front pocket if you want. It allows you to carry IWB if needed, it gives you 7 rounds or more of 9mm stopping power, which provides more confidence in what you carry.

Small 9mm’s don’t do one thing really well, but an ultracompact 9mm does a whole lot of things fairly well, and they work really well as the CCW gun to have if you can only have one. 

Worst-case Scenario

Worst-case scenario

This is going on about 6 miles away from me as I type this.

A Baja Fresh at Chandler Fashion Center remains surrounded after a shooting suspect apparently opened fire in the area and then ran into the mall.

Officers at the scene tell ABC15’s Brien McElhatten that the suspect inside the Baja Fresh is believed to have several hostages with him.

All of Chandler Fashion Center remains under lockdown as the police situation continues in the popular East Valley mall.

According to Pinal County Sheriff’s Spokesperson Tim Gaffney, the suspect is 25-year-old Daniel Munoz Perez, a shooting suspect who was mistakenly released from jail last month.

This isn’t some shootout in East L.A. or Detroit, it’s not even in the free-fire zone that is the west side of Phoenix, this is my family’s primary entertainment/shopping destination.

Now would be a good time to review Bob Owen’s guide to surviving an active shooter in a mall.

Get in.
Get low.
Get out.
Keep moving.

Read, as they say, the whole thing.

The Gun You Have

The gun you have

I still dabble in photography, even though it’s been almost ten years since it was my full-time job, and photographers are still equipment-obsessed, a trait they share with firearms enthusiasts. Camera companies spend millions of dollars on ads that show the wonderful, striking photos you can take with your SuperTouchDeluxe XV3 (now with MondoPixel technology!), and photographers fall for it, thinking that all they need is the latest technology to turn into the next Yousef Karsh.

But the fact is, great photos can be taken with any camera, and chances are, you can defend your life with just about any firearm. It’s not the tools you use, it how you use the tools you have. Tam’s post on The Firing line nails it wonderfully.

Two reasons people are anti-training (perhaps not coincidentally, this is also why people are anti- competing in organized shooting sports):

1) “It costs too much.” Somebody has fifteen guns, a motorcycle, a PS3 with plenty of games hooked to his flat-panel TeeWee (not to mention the PS2 and PlayStation in the attic), and who knows how many other toys, and a $200-$400 handgun training course “costs too much”. Hey, Skippy, how ’bout selling that Taurus Raging Judge you were bragging about buying last week and using the proceeds to get yourself taught how to use one of the fourteen other guns you already had? (And maybe sell one of those and take an MSF class for your motorcyclin’ while you’re at it.) The problem is, people can’t point at new mental furniture and say to their friends “Look what I just bought!”

2) People can’t shoot, but think they can. At the range, nobody is really watching them shoot and, face it, everybody else at the range is awful, too. But if they go to a class or enter a match, it will get proved officially: “Joe/Jane Averageshooter: First Loser”. It takes humility to learn and lose. Humble people don’t boast on their adequacy. So most people go and buy another gun instead, because when they open the box on that gun, it won’t look up at them and say “You stink!”; it’ll say “You just bought the official pistol of SWATSEAL Team 37 1/2! Congratulations!”

If you want to take better pictures, learn about light and get some training, because chances are the camera you have is up to the task. If want to defend your life, learn to use the gun(s) you have, because they’re the ones you’ll need if your life is on the line.

Product Report: Crossbreed SuperTuck Deluxe

Product Report: Crossbreed SuperTuck Deluxe

I am an Acolyte (Second Class) in The Cult Of Mac, and one of the liturgies in our faith is The Ritual of the Unboxing, where we carefully document not only our latest purchases from Apple, but how the items were shipped to us in the first place

Yes, it’s a disease, and no, there is no cure. 

So when my Crossbreed Supertuck Deluxe arrived in the mail yesterday, it’s only natural (for me, at least) to document how it got here and how it works. 

Disclaimer: I am not a high-speed, low drag operator. I scored a “1” on the mall ninja test only because my AR has a bunch of rails on it. I’m not former law enforcement or special ops, I’m just a guy who wants to protect his family as best as he can.

I had decided on CZ P07 to replace my Sccy CPX-1 as my daily (non-work) carry pistol. Finding a good day-in, day-out holster for the P07 has been a bit of a challenge. I purchased a BladeTech OWB Kydex holster for the P07 for IDPA, and I wanted my carry holster to mimic the retention and reholstering capabilities of the BladeTech but was comfortable enough to wear all the time. Because my holster options for the P07 are limited, I decided to go with a Crossbreed SuperTuck for Springfield XD-M, and it holds the P07 pretty well (more on that later).

Packaging

For starters, the holder came by regular snail mail, a surprise for someone who’s used to everything being shipped by UPS or Fedex. 

Contents

The pack contained my holster, the extra J-Hooks that I ordered in case I wanted more concealment than the normal hooks, a brief letter saying that I should hang on to this if I needed to use their lifetime warranty, a quick guide to reshaping kydex for added retention if needed, and a membership form for the NRA. One thing it didn’t come with is some instructions on how to best use it with your clothing, something that a newbie to the hybrid tuckable holster world like myself could have used. 

Fit

The P07 fits the holster quite well. Really well, in fact, considering that it was made for another gun entirely. If the retention on the BladeTech is a 10, the retention on SuperTuck is an 8. Initially, I thought it was a little loose in the holster, but once I had the holster on my belt and the gun the holster, the pressure of the holster against my body made it secure enough to go ahead and use it for now, and if I need to snug up the gun in the holster, I can always follow their instructions on how to reshape the kydex for a tighter fit. 

Concealment

The holster is incredibly comfortable to wear. My previous experience with an IWB holster has been limited to a Bianchi 100 for my Sccy CPX-1 and Galco 2nd Amendment for my P3AT. In the Crossbreed, my P07 is as easy to carry as the Sccy, even though the P07 is a bigger and heavier pistol. I chose strong backlighting for this shot because it works great (along with strong sidelight) for showing how a gun prints,. You can see in that shot while the Crossbreed does show up as a little asymmetrical, it’s nothing overtly noticeable.

IWB

It also seems easy to draw from, but I’ll know more on that later this week after I run it thru an El Presidenté or two at my next practice session. 

All in all, I’m wildly satisfied with the quality, fit and value of the holster, and I’d definitely recommend it to anyone who is looking for a comfortable, easy-to-wear and practical holster for their CCW gun. 

 

New Holster

New holster

Seeings how this post is the #2 result for “tuckable P07”, I thought an update is in order. After scouring the Internets for a tuckable IWB holster for my CZ P07, I decided, based on this post at CZforumsite.info, to go with a Crossbreed SuperTuck Deluxe for the Springfield XD. I like the concept of hybrid holsters, as they combine the easy re-holstering and retention of kydex with the comfort of leather, and I wanted a holster that would mimic my BladeTech IDPA holster as much as possible and yet still offer almost total concealment. 

It should be here in a few weeks, with a report to follow after that.

More …

Clothes Make The Man

Clothes make the man

Before I worked as a photog, I spent a couple of years behind the counter of a professional-level camera store. We had some of the best shooters in town buy from us, and some others as well. 

One guy I’ll always remember was middle-aged dude who’d come in at the same time each Saturday wearing a photog’s vest and chat cameras with us, a VERY common occurrence in a camera store. He’d talk about shutter delay and X-Sync and motor drive speed and then, after an hour or two, walk out the door back to his car, take off his immaculately clean and pressed photojournalist’s vest and drive off. 

Yep. He’d put on a shooter’s vest just to go into a store to talk about cameras. That was his idea of being a photographer.

He never came into the store during the weekday when all our other pro shooters would come in, and we never did figure out which camera this gentleman actually owned and used, but by gum, he could talk up a storm about every one on our shelves. 

So Tam’s story has a ring of familiarity about it

More …

Mommie Oakley

Mommie Oakley

The Washington Post is shocked, shocked to discover that firearms are a part of American culture

On a June evening that had cooled to a mere 110 degrees, more than a dozen women waited for a timed competition as Carol Ruh, president of the Arizona Women’s Shooting Associates, went over safety rules.

The group’s oldest member is 89. The youngest is Susan Bitter Smith’s 16-year-old daughter, who has brought her AR-15 semiautomatic rifle and her American history homework to the range. Some look like anyone’s grandmother — silvery hair possibly just styled at the salon, pastel-colored golf shirts, pressed slacks, orthopedically correct shoes — but for the handguns on their hips.

Aaaaaaahhhhh!!!! Oh noes!!!1!! Pistol-packin’ mommas on every street corner! No permit for concealed carry! The streets must be overflowing with blood! 

Eeerrr, not so much. 

But gun rights advocates say that the District’s gun control laws — not to mention prohibitions against murder — did not prevent a drive-by shooting in March that involved illegal weapons. They also say that despite having nearly 158,000 people with concealed weapons in Arizona, their homicide rate of 6.3 per 100,000 is lower than the District’s, 31.4. That’s true of Phoenix, too, where the homicide rate is 10.5 per 100,000.

It’s almost as if criminals break the law or something.