Socially Disordered

A while back I talked about what I saw as the two different kinds of threats out there

There are, as I see it, two kinds of violent encounters: Predatorial and Adversarial. The “sudden encounter” is a predator attack, be it mugger, rapist or Rottweiler. Those types of encounter require you to be on your game rightthisveryinstant and respond to the attack with enough force to end things.

The Adversarial attack is road rage or the loudmouth in bar itchin’ for a fight or the jealous spouse of a co-worker or the fight between friends that gets out of hand. Those happen in fairly well-defined patterns and if they get out of hand, they get out of hand in predictable paths that can be countered (or better yet, de-escalated) in predictable ways. 

Ymaa.com has more. 

Generally, violence can be broken down into two very broad categories: social and asocial. Social violence is what, in the natural world, would be the types of violence common within a single species. This intra-species violence does not follow the dynamic or use the same tactics as violence against other species.

The dominance game of snakes wrestling or bears pushing and mouthing is not the same as the way the same species hunt prey. Social violence includes ritualized jockeying for territory or status. It also includes acts to prove or increase group solidarity (a powerful side-effect of hunting as a team) and violence to enforce the rules and mores of the group.

Asocial violence does not target the victim as a person, but as a resource. Asocial violence is the domain of the predator and the humanity of his victim does not enter into the equation. 

Read, as they say, the whole thing.

The Weakest Link

I was catching up on back episodes of the Safety Solutions Academy podcast as I was working around the house this weekend, and Paul was talking about training to build up the weaknesses in your self-defence regimen, when I realized the biggest weakness I had was me, myself. 

I’ve never been muscular, but thanks to cross-country skiing, running and cycling, I was (WAS) in shape in my youth. Now, however, I’m a semi-old, quasi-fat white guy. 

I can (sorta) shoot, I should move up to a yellow belt in a month or two in karate and my situational awareness is pretty good. What’s missing is the conditioning needed to protect myself for any significant amount of time. 

So this morning I did a brief circuit of upper-body exercises and started the Couch To 5k running plan

Because the first step of getting into fighting shape is getting into shape. 

More …

Threats analysis

I’ve been thinking more about the comment I left in a post last week.

There are, as I see it, two kinds of violent encounters: Predatorial and Adversarial. 

The “sudden encounter” is a predator attack, be it mugger, rapist or Rottweiler. Those types of encounter require you to be on your game rightthisveryinstant and respond to the attack with enough force to end things.

The Adversarial attack is road rage or the loudmouth in bar itchin’ for a fight or the jealous spouse of a co-worker or the fight between friends that gets out of hand. Those happen on pretty well-defined patterns, and if they get out of hand, they get out of hand in predictable paths that can be countered (or better yet, de-escalated) in predictable ways. 

And as things are now, we spend a LOT of time preparing and training for the Predatorial attack: The mugger, the home invasion, the sexual assault. It’s not that these kinds of attacks aren’t real, it’s that for us law-abiding folk, they are just not that common. 

Predators tend to prey on the weak, and if you’ve taken the steps needed to secure your family at and away from home, you are not easy pickin’s no more. When such an attack happens, there’s little you can do to de-escalate the action, in fact, trying to de-escalate it will probably get you killed dead. Such an attack requires the immediate and swift application of force sufficient to end the threat. Anything less just ain’t enough.

Which leaves adversarial encounters. These differ in that we can and should control the level of force needed to end things. “A soft answer turneth away wrath” ain’t in the Bible because it sounds nice, it’s in there ’cause it works. 

Adversarial encounters can get out of hand quickly if no one choses to de-escalate. Ask any cop who’s had to arrest someone for a barfight or the murder of a friend and he’ll tell you the number one thing they’ll hear from the poor soul who’s now cuffed on the curb is “Why didn’t he just back down?”. 

I turn that around and ask “Why didn’t YOU just back down?”

Is an insult, a bad lane change or a loud remark worth twenty years of your life and the loss of your firearms freedoms? Is it worth not seeing your kids grow up or your friends? Is it worth a black mark on your record that will follow you wherever you go? 

We spend hours on the range and in the dojo preparing for the predator’s attack. How much time do we spend learning the difference between backing down and giving up? 

 

One that’s spelled L-I-T-E

It’s late at night, and you’ve been at your job for far too long, but things are wrapped up now and you FINALLY get to do what the rest of your coworkers have already done and head home for the evening. 

The sun’s gone down, and night has settled in. You navigate to your car by the glow of the street lamps, and suddenly you hear a noise. Could be a prowling cat, could be someone getting ready to jump you, so you pull out your trusty Surefire G3 to see what’s up and… 

… you realize you left the Surefire at home because it’s just too big for everyday carry.

Whoops. 

Flashlights are like firearms: It’s better to have one and not need it than need one and not have it. And just like firearms, a small but adequate light on you at all times is better (day in and day out) than a 500 lumen blaster in the car. 

I’ve carried a flashlight with me at all times for a long time now. First it was a tiny little AAA MagLIte, which was the best option at the time, and when I was a photog, I had a AA MagLite on my belt at all times, right next to the Leatherman and my cell phone. 

I used to carry a Coast LED light, but since I found out (the hard way) that they are not washing-machine safe, I’ve switched to a small but rather bright Pelican LED light. It’s not as bright as a SureFire or even my Coleman LED lights, but it’s so small and light I can carry it everywhere. A light this small is  not going to light up a person a half-mile away, but it will toss out enough light to let me identify people and threats at ranges that I can reasonably engage with my Kel-Tec P3AT or other carry pistol, and that’s all I need it to do. 

 

One that's spelled L-I-T-E

It’s late at night, and you’ve been at your job for far too long, but things are wrapped up now and you FINALLY get to do what the rest of your coworkers have already done and head home for the evening. 

The sun’s gone down, and night has settled in. You navigate to your car by the glow of the street lamps, and suddenly you hear a noise. Could be a prowling cat, could be someone getting ready to jump you, so you pull out your trusty Surefire G3 to see what’s up and… 

… you realize you left the Surefire at home because it’s just too big for everyday carry.

Whoops. 

Flashlights are like firearms: It’s better to have one and not need it than need one and not have it. And just like firearms, a small but adequate light on you at all times is better (day in and day out) than a 500 lumen blaster in the car. 

I’ve carried a flashlight with me at all times for a long time now. First it was a tiny little AAA MagLIte, which was the best option at the time, and when I was a photog, I had a AA MagLite on my belt at all times, right next to the Leatherman and my cell phone. 

I used to carry a Coast LED light, but since I found out (the hard way) that they are not washing-machine safe, I’ve switched to a small but rather bright Pelican LED light. It’s not as bright as a SureFire or even my Coleman LED lights, but it’s so small and light I can carry it everywhere. A light this small is  not going to light up a person a half-mile away, but it will toss out enough light to let me identify people and threats at ranges that I can reasonably engage with my Kel-Tec P3AT or other carry pistol, and that’s all I need it to do.