(Insight)^2.

(Insight)^2.

Take a few moments to read David Yamane’s review of “Citizen Protectors,” Jennifer Carlson’s book on the sociology of guns in America.

Two big takeaways:

“Guns solve problems for the people who bear them.”

This. A gazillion times this. I, along with millions of other responsible gun owners in America, take the time and effort to maximize the benefits of owning a gun, while minimizing the drawbacks. I want my guns to SOLVE problems, not cause them.

Secondly is this quote:

“The National Rifle Association is a quasi-regulatory agency governing concealed carry in the United States.

The VAST majority of concealed carry instructors in the U.S. get certified to teach concealed carry in their state because they are certified by the NRA as a qualified instructor. As such, NRA Training is pretty much the standard (how rigorous of a standard is a topic for another post.

 

Flash Site Pictures

Flash Site Pictures

I’ve been busy.

My review of the Primary Arms 1x Roof Prism optic is up at Shooting Illustrated. Short version: It’s my new favorite optic.

You really don’t know how much difference upgrading the trigger in your AR makes until you upgrade to a really, really good one.

And a blast from the past, a gun that I wasn’t expecting to like, but did.

Now on to the stuff I didn’t write: Claude Werner looks at the history of the Dot Torture Drill

We plan for an “average” gunfight, but is there really such a thing?

Looking forward to seeing what this turns up. I have friends on the mission field right now who are serving in countries that would kill them if they were found out to be Christians. We in America have lived many, many years without the threat of sectarian-based violence, and I hope we have a good many more as well.

This is a nifty little gadget that doesn’t scream “HEY, THERE IS IMPORTANT, EXPENSIVE STUFF IN HERE!!!” yet still keeps your stuff secure. If you travel often (especially if you store a laptop or a firearm in your room), it’d be something worth picking up.

Speaking of nifty little gadgets, Sabre Red has FINALLY built a decently-sized can of spicy treats with a good belt clip (although it’s still a bit big). Dear pepper spray manufacturers: All I want is a can that attaches either to my belt or inside my pocket that’s about the same size as a Glock 19 mag, with a flip-top safety and a reversible belt clip. Why is that so hard to make?

Me, four years ago:Now that Glock has a mini .380 out, I’m seeing a lot more chatter about how with the right bullets (I’m a fan of Hornady XTP’s myself), .380 ACP is a viable self-defense round.”
Bart Skelton, this month:There’s a certain term that I’ve personally shunned that refers to small firearms and a certain species of rodent. I don’t care for the phrase.”
Me neither.

This Is How We Win.

This Is How We Win.

Three weeks into the new job, and I’m going shooting this weekend at a Shoot N Scoot event with a co-worker who’s gun-curious.

This same weekend, there’ll be a bunch of gun owners stamping their feet and clapping their hands and doing the firearms equivalent of “We’re here, we’re queer, and we’re not going away!” on the steps of the state capitol in Tallahassee.

But do events like that actually change the world?

No, not really. All things like that do is make the people who went to the rally feel like they DID something, but anyone who’s not in earshot of that rally doesn’t really care about YOUR right to keep and bear arms, they care about feeling safe in an unsafe world. Who will help calm that fear, a person screaming at the top of their lungs about “MY RIGHTS!!!,” or calm, cool, collected progressive who wants to make sure that those gun nuts don’t do scary things anymore?

You want to change the world? Change it one person at a time. Rather than make a spectacle of yourself, take someone to the range.

The rights you save may be your own.

What We Are Not.

What We Are Not.

I’m not sure if Concealed Nation is trolling us or not here, but this is pretty much everything you don’t want to do if you’re an armed citizen. All that’s missing is a Concealed Carry badge.

The funny thing is, though, that aside from some bad decisions about ammo, handcuffs, holsters and a useless micro cassette recorder, I carry variations of what he carries. Instead of a SIG 229, I carry a Shield. I carry a multitool, and a knife, and a flashlight, and pepper spray.

It’s not WHAT you carry, it’s why you carry it. This gentleman obviously proud of his law enforcement training and sees his role as an armed citizen to be a cop, sans badge.

This is not my role. My role is much more personal. I’m concerned about my health and the health of those dear to me. I’m not carrying a gun to right society’s wrongs, I carry a gun so I can emerged unscathed should bad things happen to me.

Why, it’s almost as if the mission drives the equipment, or something…

Flash Site Pictures

Flash Site Pictures

Three Concealed Carry Myths Debunked. The Sheriff speaks the truth here. Read it.

What, a guns of the 80’s retrospective WITHOUT the classic Witness Protection shorty 870? For shame! 🙂

Tam does a good job elucidating what you want and don’t want in a carry holster (two guesses which holster shown in that article wasn’t one that she had in mind when she wrote it…). 🙂

Some nice little drills for the indoor range. If you can’t adapt your teaching to work on a “bowling alley” indoor range, you are setting your beginning to intermediate students up to fail.

Lessons from a daytime home invasion. A few years ago, we lived in a neighborhood in Chandler, Arizona that was, um, in transition, and the townhouse next to us had it’s door kicked in and ransacked, while ours wasn’t. Why? We had an external security door on both entrances, and they didn’t.

I really liked the iDryfire and Sharpshot EZ dry fire training apps. You can easily set up a dry fire dojo inside your bedroom or garage for under $100. Just do it.

This is actually a pretty good list of books about America’s gun culture. I see some that I’ve read, and some I need to read.

College students learning about guns. More of this, please.

Hobbyist’s Lobby

Hobbyist’s Lobby

Grant Cunningham (and others), talk about the “gun training hobby,” and I gotta admit they have a point. Going to gun school for more than just a few hours a year is not a thing that most gun owners do. Only a select few consider something like Rangemaster to be a “must-see” event, and they’re the ones who set the pace for “serious” firearms training in the U.S.

When does the circuit get flipped between someone who’s a casual gun owner and a gun training “hobbyist”? Well, for me, it was when I realized I don’t “go shooting” anymore: When I go to the range it’s to work on a drill or try out a gun or practice a skill. The last time I went to the range to shoot for shooting’s sake was when I did a quick test of the Kel-Tec PMR30, a ridiculously fun gun to shoot. Other than that, I see marksmanship as a skill to master, not as a pastime or recreational endeavor.

Is that a problem? No. But it becomes a problem when it gets in the way of me doing stuff with the people who like going shooting solely for fun. Those of us at the deep end of the pool need to remember how much fun it is splashing around in the shallows can be, or else we’ll never get people to try to extend their skills.

Flash Site Pictures

Flash Site Pictures

There used to be a time when Wired would be happy about a product that empowers people to fight against tyranny. This is no longer the case.

Related: “Significantly, the government expressly acknowledges that non-automatic firearms up to .50-caliber – including modern semi-auto sporting rifles such as the popular AR-15 and similar firearms – are not inherently military.”
That, my friends, is a huge, huge win, and a knife through the heart of any so-called “assault weapons ban.”

The reality that you are, and always have been your own first responder is starting to seep into the general populace. Good.

Speaking of must-have items, Chuck Haggard has a great article on how and when to spice up somebody’s life with a blast of OC spray.

I’d like to see the .380 added into this test, but if there’s not that much difference between what 9mm does to a target over .45, why carry a lower-capacity .45 instead of a 9mm?

What happens when civility REALLY breaks down and the Communists Democratic Socialists and the fascists National Socialists go at for real? You get years of lead. Read and ask yourself whether this will happen in the United States sometime soon.

I hope it doesn’t.

Flash Site Pictures

Flash Site Pictures

Are Race Holsters really worth the $$$$?

The Liberator pistol and Sten SMG were designed to be functional firearms that can be built in a garage, and this is further proof of that fact.

I did the writeup on the Ruger PC Carbine for Shooting Illustrated. Spoiler alert: I liked it. But then again, I’ve been a fan of pistol-caliber carbines for quite awhile.

Five easy upgrades for your AR-15. If you bought an AR but don’t know what to do with it, this is where I’d start.

Both the NRA and the Huffington Post agree: Justice Kennedy’s retirement is bad news for gun control.

Not sure I agree with the Sheriff here about carrying a reload. I carry one for my Shield, but with 9+1 in it now, I’m not certain I need one.

My CZ75s are proof that I was into TA/DA guns before they were cool (/gunhipster).

Welcome To The Pinhead Ballroom.

Welcome To The Pinhead Ballroom.

As someone who gets no end of grief for his concealed carry choices (“A .380 in your pocket, with no reload? You’ll be killed on the streets tomorrow!”), I get what Tom is saying here.

We can be a puritanical lot… “Thou dost forsake the carrying of a G34 with a U-Boat close to thine appendix in favor of the Ba’al and his liking of the .38 snubbie? For shame! Thou art accursed among men! Begone, heretic, and dwell forever in the outer darkness with the other unbelievers and their unnatural desire for the subcompact 9mm!”

15 years ago it was .40S&W or GTFO and .223 was good for small dogs and nothing else, now we’re moved on to other things. The music may change, but the song remains the same.

It kinda reminds me of the first part of Monty Python’s “Spanish Inquisition” sketch… “Our chief weapon is fear.. fear and surprise. Our TWO chief weapons are fear, surprise and ruthless efficiency. Our THREE chief weapons are…”

And so on.

We scream  “Carry your guns, people!” and then it soon progresses to “Carry your guns, people! And a light! And spray! And two knives! And a TQ and chest seal! And a reload! And a backup gun! And a weapon-mounted light! Those are ALL essential!”  To borrow from The Incredibles, when everything is essential, then nothing is. Let’s start with getting people to understand that they are ALWAY their own first responder: The top of the funnel is the important part, because without it, arguing about expert knowledge will never happen.

If everyone who posts on the internet explaining why a G34 with an RMR is the überwaffen spent 1/10th of that time trying to figure out ways to get their friends who have a CCW to carry their guns on a consistent basis, we’d have reciprocity and SHARE and everything we dream of.

Instead, we argue whether the angels should be doing the Lindy or the Foxtrot on top of their pin…

Following The Same Path

Following The Same Path

Outdoor Life notices the same thing that I noticed seven years ago: It’s a cast iron b!tch to get into hunting as an adult.

“We’re preaching to the choir. We’re giving the kids of folks who already hunt this opportunity, rather than reaching new audiences.”

Well duh.

And here’s the scary thing to think about: What is Gun Culture 2.0 doing to avoid the same mistakes that Gun Culture 1.0 made? Yes, there is Colion Noir and TWAW and Scholastic Steel, but who besides Gabby Franco is reaching out to the Latino population? “Roof Korean” is a meme inside gun culture, but who is bringing ACTUAL KOREANS to the range?

Republican strategist Luke Thompson said something interesting on Jonah Goldberg’s “The Remnant podcast” a few week ago: For years, the Republicans were an ideologically-based party, united around fighting Communism and (allegedly) wanting a smaller role for government in our lives, while the Democrats were a majority, coalition-based party, with everyone from white Catholic longshoremen to rural Methodist blacks in their ranks.  In the post-Obama era, this is no longer true: The Democrats are turning into a ideological party based around the most leftist ideas possible, and thanks to the working middle class joining their ranks in droves in 2016 and now owning (or about to own) all three branches of government, the Republicans are a majority party with a broader base.

Question: For decades, ever since the Revolt In Cincinnati, the political power of gun owners has been ideological-based, based on the fact that we were at the time a minority.

This is no longer the case, which makes me wonder, what would a majority-based NRA coalition look like, and do we actually want such a thing?