Ready For Takeoff

Ready For Takeoff

Air Marshall DrillI wanted to try out my new Blackhawk! mag pouch and the updated SureFire Time app and try another run through the Federal Air Marshall Qualifier

The Drill
All strings are shot from a distance of seven yards. Qualification: Time: Cannot exceed total time for each drill. Example: Drill #1 – 1st time 1.70 seconds, 2nd time 1.55 seconds; Total = 3.25 seconds = Go. Must achieve a “GO” on each drill. Accuracy: Target is FBI “QIT” (bottle). Total rounds fired is 30. Point value inside bottle = 5. Point value touching line or outside bottle = 2. Maximum possible score = 150. Mininum qualifying score = 135. All stages must equal “GO” to qualify. 

And just like my other attempts at this drill, I’m using a USPSA Metric target instead of an FBI QIT target, scoring A’s, B’s and C’s as 5 points and D’s as 2 points.

  

Drill Date 3/4/11 5/26/11 10/7/11 3/7/12
   Par Time Score P Time Score P Time Score P Time Score P
One Round (Twice) 3.3 Seconds Total
Concealed from Holster
1.65 1.92 10 F 1.54 5 p 1.79 5 F 1.60 5 P
1.65 1.82 10 F 1.63 2 p 1.73 5 F 1.52  5 P
Double Tap (twice) 2.70 Seconds Total
Low Ready
1.35 .98 10 P 1.35 10 p 1.26 10 P 1.4 7 P
1.35 1.07 10 P 1.35 10 P 1.72 10 F 0.99 7 P
Rhythm: Fire 6 rounds at one target;
no more than 0.6 second between each shot.
3 Seconds Total Low Ready
3.00 2.62 10 P 3.31 30 F 4.32 30 F 3.02 30 P
One Shot, speed reload, one shot (twice).
6.5 Seconds Total
From low ready
3.25 2.89 10 P 3.85 10 F 4.09 10 F 3.21 7 P
3.25 5.35 10 F 4.25 10 F 3.73 10 F 2.93 10 P
One Round each at two targets three yards apart (Twice).
3.3 Seconds Total Low Ready
1.65 1.35 10 P 1.26 5 F 1.35 10 P 1.64 10 P
1.65 .89 7 F 1.35 4 P 1.2 10 F 1.52 10 P
180° pivot. One round each at three targets (twice). Turn left, then right.
7.0 Seconds Total Concealed From Holster.
3.50 2.84 10 F 2.84 7 P 2.83 15 P 2.72 15 P
3.50 2.75 5 F 4.88 9 P 3.02 15 P 3.50 15 P
One Round, slide locks back; drop to one knee; reload; fire one round. (twice). 8.0 Seconds Total   5.1 10 F 5.25 10 F 6.55 10 F 2.84 10 P
  4.7 10 F 4.25 10 F 6.27 10 F 2.80 10 P
Results     137 F   112 F   150 F   141 P

I passed!

What made the difference? 

1. Practice with my CZ P07. While I didn’t learn a lot of new things during my time at Front Sight, I did put 600+ rounds through the sucker and got in a LOTof practice drawing from concealment. 

2. The new mag pouch made swapping out mags MUCH faster. 

3. I changed up how I dealt with “low ready” to a “compressed high ready” position. I didn’t do this just to get faster on this drill; I’d rather have my gun nice and close to me and in my control rather than out at arm’s length and accessible to all. 

And the SureFire app worked flawlessy on my iPhone 4: It recorded every shot and worked just as it should. Not bad for a free app. 

 

Socially Disordered

Socially Disordered

A while back I talked about what I saw as the two different kinds of threats out there

There are, as I see it, two kinds of violent encounters: Predatorial and Adversarial. The “sudden encounter” is a predator attack, be it mugger, rapist or Rottweiler. Those types of encounter require you to be on your game rightthisveryinstant and respond to the attack with enough force to end things.

The Adversarial attack is road rage or the loudmouth in bar itchin’ for a fight or the jealous spouse of a co-worker or the fight between friends that gets out of hand. Those happen in fairly well-defined patterns and if they get out of hand, they get out of hand in predictable paths that can be countered (or better yet, de-escalated) in predictable ways. 

Ymaa.com has more. 

Generally, violence can be broken down into two very broad categories: social and asocial. Social violence is what, in the natural world, would be the types of violence common within a single species. This intra-species violence does not follow the dynamic or use the same tactics as violence against other species.

The dominance game of snakes wrestling or bears pushing and mouthing is not the same as the way the same species hunt prey. Social violence includes ritualized jockeying for territory or status. It also includes acts to prove or increase group solidarity (a powerful side-effect of hunting as a team) and violence to enforce the rules and mores of the group.

Asocial violence does not target the victim as a person, but as a resource. Asocial violence is the domain of the predator and the humanity of his victim does not enter into the equation. 

Read, as they say, the whole thing.

What Armed Self-Defense REALLY Looks Like

What Armed Self-Defense REALLY looks like

An absolutely fascinating read, courtesy of Jay G.

Here’s my analysis of what armed self-defense for the Private Citizen, not LEO, looks like. You decide what suits your needs best to solve this type of problem.
Private citizens reload in approximately 1/2 of one percent of shooting incidents (3/482).
If the defender fires any shots, most likely it will be 2 rounds.
The shooting distance in the vast majority of cases was slightly in excess of arm’s length.

Some other takeaways from this study:

The firearm was carried on the body of the defender in only 20% of incidents. In 80% of cases, the firearm was obtained from a place of storage, frequently in another room.

The majority of incidents (52%) took place in the home. Next most common locale (32%) was in a business. Incidents took place in public places in 9% of reports and 7% occurred in or around vehicles. The most common initial crimes were armed robbery (32%), home invasion (30%), and burglary (18%).

Multiple conspirators were involved in 36% of the incidents. However, there are no apparent cases of drivers or lookouts acting as reinforcements for the criminal actor(s) once shooting starts. Immediate flight is the most common response for drivers and lookouts at the sound of gunfire.

So criminals are cowards who prefer to break into houses or businesses where people have all their stuff rather than attack them on the street.

Makes sense to me.

Product Reviews: Uncle Mike’s Instructor’s Belt And GunVault BreechVault

Product Reviews: Uncle Mike’s Instructor’s Belt and GunVault BreechVault

I used some leftover Amazon.com credit (thank you everyone, for clicking on the links and buying stuff) to fill in a couple of gaps in my personal protection inventory.

First up, a better way to secure my home defence shotgun.

Even though it’s my safe room gun, I put a lock on this gun because I have two small boys in my house and they get in to EVERYTHING. I had been used the cable lock that came with my 930SPX, but it was a) awkward and b) really hard to open.

Breechvault

Enter the BreechVault. The price was certainly right at under $20, and it came with adapter to make it work with WInchester, Remington and Mossberg shotguns. Or so they said.

Does it fit my 500 Persuader? Sorta.

The lock fit into easily into the breech of my scattergun, but when it came time to close the lock, it took a LOT of force to close it all the way and withdraw the key. Worse yet, it took a lot of force to open the lock, which would NOT be a good thing in an emergency situation. Fortunately, 10 minutes with some wet/dry sandpaper solved this problem, and the lock is now easy to open but still secures the action, making the gun completely inoperative.

Breechvault

No, that will not be the final resting place of that key.

Final Grade: C+. It gains points for flexibility and utility, loses points to requiring modification to fit my Mossberg.

Next, the Uncle Mike’s Instructor Belt.

Shameful confession: I’ve never owned an actual gun belt. I’ve been using either a Dickie’s work belt I bought from WalMart for everyday use and the inside belt from my CR Speed Belt set for competition and training.

Enough was enough, I said to myself. Self, I said, it’s time to get something like a REAL gun belt.

Uncle Mike's Belt

Depending on how much I ate for lunch that day, my natural belt size falls between 32 and 34 inches, and I find It’s hard to get a notched belt to fit properly. One of the things I like about my CR speed belt is because it fastens using Velcro hook and loop fasteners, it’s infinitely adjustable. The same is true for the Uncle Mike’s belt, and I like that a lot.

However, the belt size descriptions on Amazon.com are a little off. I comfortably carry my CZ P07 in an IWB holster in size 36 pants, so I figured I needed the “medium” sized belt for waist sizes 32-36.

Nope.

Once I returned that belt for the “large” 38-42″ belt, it worked just fine with my setup. Caveat Emptor.

The belt itself is great. I’ve worn it for the past two days and it’s more comfortable than the CR Speed belt and much more adjustable than a leather work belt.

Final Grade: A solid B+. Once you find the correct size, it’s a great belt.

 

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Play Stupid Games,

Play stupid games,

win stupid prizes

Steve Carbajal with the Tempe Police Department said officers responded to The Clubhouse Music Venue near Broadway and Rural Roads around 11:30 p.m. after receiving a report of shots being fired during a rap concert.

Thirteen victims have been identified and two of those victims were taken to local hospitals in serious condition, according to Carbajal.

In my younger days, I loved going to clubs to listen to live music. 

How I survived it, I will never know. 

And I’ll bet The Clubhouse was posted “No Firearms Allowed” as well, yet this somehow this happened. Maybe they should put up a big “No Shooting Twelve or More People” sign right next to it…

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Quote Of The Day

Quote of the day

“Cats understand the reality that inanimate objects are incapable of action on their own parts, and cannot hold motives – malicious or otherwise – intrinsic to themselves. 

Some humans, on the other hand, do not. 

I wonder what that says about our species?”

Linoge

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Half Aware

Half aware

Went out to lunch with a friend of mine yesterday to a decent (but not great – Memo to the cook: Back away from the orange sauce) Thai restaurant in a local strip mall.

Driving up in to the parking lot, I spotted three young men who sent me in to Condition Orange. What set me off? Don’t know, but it did. I met my friend at the restaurant and because of those guys I spotted in the part, asked for a table that had a view of my car outside.

While we were eating, two more young men strolled by that also caught my eye, and as we left the restaurant, i realized why I was on high alert all the time.

The restaurant was right next to a “smoke shop” that advertised drug paraphenalia for sale.

Oops.

Now this restaurant wasn’t in a bad section of town. Not the best, but not the worst. How did I miss such an obvious clue? Driving in to the parking lot, I was focused on the three young men I mentioned earlier and missed the fact there was a head shop right next to where we would be eating.

Oops.

Takeaway here? Don’t let a perceived threat impair your perception of other threats. Focus on the what set you off in to Condition Orange, but beware of tunnel vision.

Because you never know when you’ll need to spot the gorilla.

Pouch Potato

Pouch Potato

One of the things that’s become painfully clear recently is that I need a better way to carry a spare magazine when I carry concealed. Quick reloads are a big reason why I’ve yet to pass the Air Marshall Qualifier Drill, and so I started looking around for alternatives. I used my Blade-Tech pouches with my CZ P07 when I when to Front Sight, and I got used to just grabbing my spare mag when I needed it without having to fumble with extraneous flaps and whatnot. 

You’d think with the booming popularity of personal defence, you’d see a bunch of low-priced mag pouches designed for concealed carry. 

And you’d be wrong. 

My first attempt at a spare mag pouch was a horizontal cell phone pouch, which didn’t really work because it was still a two-step process to access the spare mag: One to pop open the case and one to grab the mag. So the search was on for a replacement. 

Mag  pouches

First up was a spare case for my old Blackberry Curve (on the left in the photo). It gained points for not having a flap to get in the way, but it didn’t hold the spare mag securely and seated the mag too deeply to easily grab. 

Next I tried a spare multitool case (center) and a nylon Blackhawk! mag pouch (right) I bought at the local Wal-Mart, but again, that $#!@ cover flap got in the way of a speedy reload. 

So off I went to Amazon.com. There are a LOT of mag pouches out there, but I found out quickly they fell into one of three categories: Cheap nylon pouches with cover flaps that were similar to what I already had tried and rejected, high-speed low-drag race gear like the Blade-Techs I already own, and leather pouches that held two mags but cost $50 or more. 

I carry A spare mag, not two. I have 16 in the CZ or 10 in the Sccy, and if 32/20 rounds of 124 grain Speer Gold Dot doesn’t take care of the problem, it’s time to beat feet. I began to suspect that the majority of the mag pouches I found were designed for law enforcement and not concealed carry. 

Eventually, I found a Blackhawk! single mag pouch for double-stack 9mm/.40. The price was certainly right, and it held one mag rather than two without a cover flap. 

Mag and pouch

And it works! 

Mag in pouch

It’s very comfortable, (I have it on my hip as I type this) and yet it holds the magazine securely and it’s just as fast to access as my Blade-Tech race rig. Tomorrow I’ll take it the range and run it through both the Air Marshall Drill and my usual round of drills and see how it works in everyday use. 

 

Going Home.

Going home.

Michael Bane, Rev. Paul and Guffaw are all talking about the idea of a “go-to” gun, the gun you use when your pistol just ain’t enough. 

I have two, one for the car and one for the house. Let’s tackle the easy subject, the house gun, first. 

In my safe room, I have my Mossberg 500

In my car, I have something different. 

Get Home Rifle

I’ve got my get-home bag in the trunk of my car, along with my CavArms AR on a three-point sling and the Sccy 9mm pistol which I usually carry inside my car. 

Ok, why this stuff? 

  1. It’s stuff I already have. I don’t have a big budget for firearms (heck, right now, I have NO budget at all), so I have to use what I have. The CavArms rifle is LIGHT (just about 6 pounds unloaded), and I know I can hit with it out to 300 yards. 

  2. It’s light. The whole kit together weighs about 30 pounds, yet it has the things I need to keep me going for 3 days or more, no matter where I am. 

  3. It’s enough. Look, if I can’t deal with whatever is going on with a rifle, a pistol and 3 days of food, then it’s time for the full Rockatansky

  4. It works in Arizona. If I were traveling around the country like Michael Bane does, I’d want something lighter and less conspicuous. But I don’t, so this is all I’ll most likely ever need within the boundaries of the Copper State. 

What would I change if I could? 

  • The pistol. I like the idea of a subcompact 9mm in this kit as it gives me enough gun but it’s still small enough to pocket-carry if need be, but me and the Sccy have a rocky relationship together. I want to replace it with Ruger LC9 or similar whenever I can. 

  • The rifle. Being able to reach out to 200+ yards with a rifle is good, but I give up ammo compatibility with my pistol and all-around utility. I’m thinking about changing that out for either a 9mm Kel-Tec Sub2000 or another pump-action shotgun in the near future. 

And yes, I leave all that in my car all the time. 

I understand people’s concerns about idea of leaving two guns unattended, but the fact is, there’s nothing either inside or outside my car that is remotely desirable to even the most desperate of car thieves, and I leave my car in my garage at night. My car is a seriously uncool late-model import painted a bland medium grey. It has a factory radio and a kid’s car seat and that’s about it. 

Sometimes, the best way to avoid a robbery is making it look like there’s nothing there to steal. 

The Weakest Link

The Weakest Link

I was catching up on back episodes of the Safety Solutions Academy podcast as I was working around the house this weekend, and Paul was talking about training to build up the weaknesses in your self-defence regimen, when I realized the biggest weakness I had was me, myself. 

I’ve never been muscular, but thanks to cross-country skiing, running and cycling, I was (WAS) in shape in my youth. Now, however, I’m a semi-old, quasi-fat white guy. 

I can (sorta) shoot, I should move up to a yellow belt in a month or two in karate and my situational awareness is pretty good. What’s missing is the conditioning needed to protect myself for any significant amount of time. 

So this morning I did a brief circuit of upper-body exercises and started the Couch To 5k running plan

Because the first step of getting into fighting shape is getting into shape. 

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