Armed? Who, me?

I’ve got a family trip coming up to a couple of Orlando theme parks that use metal detectors and bag searches to make sure they’re “weapons-free” zones.

Uh-huh.

I’m not planning on carrying a firearm with me into the parks, but I do want to carry a knife with me because a knife is useful for more than just defending your life.

After a few searches and reading a few blogs that I trust, I settled on the Boker Plus 01BO010 credit card knife.

The knife is skinny and hides easily. It is, essentially, your daily carry folding knife’s anorexic midget cousin. Without the clip, it’s just a few millimeters wide, and the size is very conducive to carrying inconspicuously.

That’s the new Boker next to my usual covert carry knife, a CRKT Pazoda 2, and a AA battery on the right. The blade on the Boker is taller and longer than the Pazoda, but the handle is a little shorter, which means I can only grip it with two fingers instead of three. Yes, that is an issue, but no, I’m not too worried about it. This is not a fighting knife, as it takes me two hands to open, but it is very useful thing to have with you because it’s a knife, and knives are handy.

The blade is 440-C stainless, and out of the box, it was quite dull. This did not please me, but a few moments with a sharpener solved that problem.

Did I mention it’s easy to conceal? Believe it or not, the Boker is in this photo, tucked in between a couple of dollar bills.

What’s the first rule of camouflage? Help the people see what they’re expecting to see, and in this case, the aluminum in my Ridge wallet will set off the metal detector, along with the metal in the knife.

Overall, I’m very happy with this knife. Yes, there were other, more covert options out there that are better fighting knives, but I’m not really too concerned about fighting my way through the line for “It’s A Small World”. Rather, I want a knife with me because of all the other things a knife can do, and this little Boker seems about right for that job.

There Is No Such Thing As The United States Of America When It Comes To Guns.

Spend a few minutes reading this post from David Yamane on who is usually guns to commit violence in America, and who is not. It’s well worth your time. Here’s a brief sample:

Taking an aggregate statistic like this, we often hear about how much higher the homicide rate is in the United States than other “similar” countries.

But there is a problem with such population averages: they gloss over important differences between subpopulations within the United States. For example, according to “Firearms Injuries in the United States,” the firearm homicide rate for those 25-34 is more than four times greater than the rate for those 55-64 (8.01 vs. 1.47). The rate for men is 6.13 and for women 1.15. The rate for non-Hispanic Blacks is 14.78 compared to 0.99 for non-Hispanic Asian/Pacific Islanders.

Of course, these differences in subpopulations are related also to economics, and economics are closely related to residence in the United States. As I have argued previously, the problem with averages is that no one lives in “The United States.”

And it gets better from there. Go read it all.

Drunk Uncle

THis is a problem for YOU to deal with.

As I said, a long, long time ago, one of the reasons why I got into this armed self-protecting thing was because my wife’s cousin, a man with a history of drug abuse and a previous conviction for manslaughter, started to take what I thought was an uncomfortable amount of interest her whereabouts and what she was doing.

He did the world a favor and offed himself soon after that, but it woke me up to the fact that there are people who cannot be avoided or reasoned with, and that means I was left with violence as a way to get them out of our lives.

It also made me realize that a potential threat to my family’s well-being existed inside the confines of our extended family. We go around pre-visualizing “black swan” events like the mugger in the ski mask jumping out and yelling “GIMMEYOURMONEY!”, when the reality is, we probably need to worry about people we already know as our attacker, be it the guy who snaps at work or the drunk, angry uncle or something similar.

Thankfully, you and I are probably not going to have to one-shot a terrorist on a rampage or take on an active shooter. But an out-of-control relative or close friend? Maybe.

It’s one thing to walk around the street pie-ing corners because of the knockout game, and another to act calm and friendly around a creepy co-worker or (in my case) a felonious cousin. How often do we run through scenarios that involve de-escalation and de-assing ourselves rather than concealment and cover? How much of our mindset is devoted to impossible scenarios, and how much to the possible?

Door Kickers On The Home Front.

Thinking more about yesterday’s post, maybe the reasons behind some of the (in Tam’s wonderful words) “Battle of Fallujah cosplay” that’s going on now might be because of where our current wars are being fought. Unlike previous wars that were fought out in the boonies somewhere, vets from today’s wars are coming home with experience fighting on urban terrain, then they try to apply the knowledge that kept them alive in cities overseas to their lives over here, with varying results. There is a LOT we can learn spotting trouble before it happens from people who have done overwatch on a convoy for years and years, but on the other hand, if I have to do a “clear and hold” operation on a nearby neighborhood, that probably means a) I am living in the wrong freaking neighborhood and b) isn’t that the cop’s job, not mine?

That being said, why hasn’t the info on how the contractors and others working overseas doing personal security work spread far and wide amongst us civilians? I’ve been trying for YEARS to find a good entry-level “executive protection” class for schmoes like me, but to absolutely no avail. The bodyguard’s job is lot closer to my job (if you want to call it a job, because doing so treads dangerously close to SHEEPDOG! territory) as an armed civilian that the soldier’s role is. The role of a bodyguard is to make sure the people under his or her care make it through the day alive, and the tools that a bodyguard has to use (a good set of eyes, an alert mind, and maybe a pistol or something) is much closer to what I have on me right now than someone jogging down a dusty street in Mosul with his platoon might have with them.

I will take two paragraphs on pre-attack indicators and how to react to a quick punch to the head over ten pages on how to form up a stack and breach a door. Nothing against those who are running towards the sound of gunfire, I will always respect what they do, but what they do and what I do exist in two separate worlds.

Justify Your Existence On This Planet.

So the question was asked by a friend on Facebook,

Just exactly what is the purpose and goal of defensive firearms training? It really can’t be based on probability, because the probability is you will never need to use a gun to defend yourself.
So what circumstances should we train for and what should be our priorities?

I have three answers for that question.

  1. Because I can, that’s why.
  2. Yes, the odds are very, very low. The stakes, however, are very, very mortal. It’s like being in a traffic accident. No, I don’t get into an accident every day (even with #FloridaMan as a constant companion on the roads), but despite that, I still wear my seatbelt every time I get in the car.
  3. One of the reasons why I got started in this was because of the perception of increasing violence in and around my city.

Now, though, ten years later, things have changed. I still want to be become a better gun owner, but in the process of becoming a better defensive gun owner, I’m a quieter, gentler soul (because of the need to de-escalate), I’m an active participant in the (fun) sport of practical shooting, gotten in better shape, met some great people, learned how to be a better driver and a better parent thru more awareness and I’ve *definitely* become more aware of the long-term consequences of my actions.
As it turns out, one of the biggest reasons for the journey is not the destination, but rather the journey itself.

The Family That Stacks Together, Attacks Together

What would a “Tactical Gentleman’s Weekend” for Gun Culture 2.0 look like?

It’s an interesting challenge, because let’s face it, shooting stuff from speedboats is FUN, while learning how to de-escalate an angry drunk has a certain “eat your broccoli, it’s good for you” feel to it. It’s been my goal for a while now to eat my broccoli and become a responsible gun owner in every sense of the word. The issue is, though, that society today does not see “responsible” as a desirable thing, so balancing the broccoli and the ice cream is an ongoing challenge.

With that in-mind, here’s what I’d like to see in two-day “tactical gentleman’s” weekend that would apply to today’s CCW holder.

  • A Heavy Emphasis On Concealed Carry
    Ideally, you’d have to commit to coming to class with your primary carry rig, along with a few extra mag pouches for administration purposes.
  • Holistic, lifestyle-based approach to personal protection.
    Concealed carry, home defense, whatever.
  • Defending others as well as yourself.
    Girlfriend, friends, family, whatever. We don’t live on a deserted island, and our training shouldn’t reflect that either.

Some specific topics to cover:

  • Creating a safe room, home security, low-light ops
  • De-Escalation / Situational Awareness
  • Intro to Empty hand / Combatives
  • Basic Trauma Care
  • Shoot / No Shoot (ideally in a shoothouse of some kind

Will I ever see such a thing in my lifetime? Dunno. But it’d be cool when it happens.

 

I’ll Come To Your Emotional Rescue.

Ron Avery has some interesting thoughts on bringing the reality of the gunfight into our training and practice.

Practice with the emotional intensity of a real encounter. You are FIGHTING, not just shooting. Psychological toughness/dominance is a mindset that must be exercised in order to develop it. As part of your training, visualize what you are doing as an actual encounter. Mindset is everything and it starts before you get to the range. Paul Carlson also expressed similar thoughts on a recent episode of The Gunfighter podcast, and that got me thinking about the dog that is not barking inside the training community, namely, creating the emotions we’ll need to win a deadly force encounter.

To be honest, prepping for the emotional portion of a deadly force encounter has not entered my mind in the least. Maybe it’s because there is a fine, fine line between the sense of urgency brought on by an emotional response and the physical and mental shutdown brought on by panic and fear.

The thing is, thought, that my reasons for pursing armed self-defense are pretty much 100% emotional: I don’t want to die, and I don’t want my loved ones to die either.

Emotions, when used properly, can he a powerful, powerful tool. This was brought home to me a few years ago when I trained with Gabe Suarez. He was trying to show us his techniques for shooting and moving, and I, like the good gamer I was, preferred to shoot it in an IDPA duck-walk rather than the flat-out run he wanted. I wasn’t able to muster the speed needed because I didn’t understand the need for speed in that situation.

Then Gabe pointed the frame of his Glock (not the gun, just the frame) at my face, and the reason for speeding up became much, much clearer.

Training with Gabe Suarez

As I said on-camera, having that inert hunk of plastic pointed at me put things in a whole new light. All of a sudden, I went from trying to solve the intellectual problem of absorbing what I was being taught and the physical challenge of doing the required tasks to dealing with the emotions associated with having someone trying to kill me and using thouse emotions to enhance my abliities, rather than detract from my performance.

It’s interesting that with just over 300 hours of formal training under my belt, that has been the one and only time (so far) that an instructor has brought in an element of preparing for the emotional stress of a gunfight, and I think the training community as a whole is missing out on something here. Yes, learning the physical skills needed to survive is important, as is having the intellectual firepower needed to solve problems quickly under stress, but let’s not forget that all of that starts with the will to win, thrive and survive all that might be thrown at us, and that starts with having the emotional fortitude to carry us through to victory.

A Swing And A Miss.

flinch_smallShort Barrel Shepherd has a take on the startle/flinch/response thing that merits some further discussion.

I have never been startled in real life physical confrontations or in force on force training scenarios. This is not because I am super tough or really switched on.

It’s because the encounters I’ve experienced have had a ramp-up period from observation to action. Sometimes the period is long, sometimes short, but I’ve never been startled in a fight.

And that’s been my experience as well. I’m not a professional badass, so my experience is limited at this sort of thing, but every time something did happen, there was something that set me off ahead of time that allowed me to ramp up from “Huh, that’s not right” to “Oh boy, bad things are headed my way, and fast!”. The amount of violence may have surprised me a couple of times, but there was something in the situation told me that I’d have to think fast, run fast or hit fast in order to deal with what was headed my way.

That photo over there on the right has been used in some classes to show that a flinch/startle response is natural for we primates, and therefore, we need to train that exact move into how we draw our gun.

Except what you don’t see in that picture is all the other people in the ballpark who know something is wrong, but are not throwing up their hands around their heads because, sonuvagun, they’re smart enough to realize that sort of thing is not the proper response because there is not a bat headed their way.

Yes, they were startled. No, they didn’t flinch.

How long we would have lasted on the African veldt if all the monkeys in the tribe reacted the exact same way to one of their number getting eaten by a leopard? We would have never made it out of Olduvai Gorge, and the world would have been ruled by sentient house cats, or something.

We vary our response by the nature and proximity of threats around us. Always have, always will, and your training better darn well reflect that.