Bloggershoot!

Time for another Arizona gunblogger get-together in Casa Grande! 

Date: Saturday, November 6th
Time: 8 am (-ish) to whenever (Kevin’s getting there at 7am: I like my rest, so I’m planning for 8).
Location: Elsy Pearson Rifle Range, Casa Grande
Food: Bring your own, and water too
Targets: Bring those too

Last year’s meetup was a heck of a good time, and we hope to see even more people out there this time. RSVP here or at Kevin’s

The camera you have

As I’ve said before, I was a full-time commercial photographer for 10 years before I switched careers to web marketing, and I was/ am a die-hard Nikon guy. I carried an FG all over Latin America (Why an FG and not one of my F3’s? An FG is light. More on that later.), and I could usually be found with a bag of SLR’s hanging off my left shoulder, and if that wasn’t enough, I had a studio full of Hasselblads and Sinars to fall back on.

But I loved my Olympus XA. The other cameras I owned were/are great (an FM2 with motor drive can double as a hammer in a pinch. Ask me how I know this), but they were bigger, and I didn’t carry them around all the time. My XA could fit into a pocket, had a first-rate lens in a useful focal length, was manual focus and gave some control over exposure settings, even though it was an aperture-preffered automatic.

Because it was so small and yet so versatile, I carried one with me all the time and a result, I got some pretty good shots with it, shots that I couldn’t get if I didn’t have a camera with me.

To quote Chase Jarvis, what’s the best camera for you?

The one you have with you.

My XA is gone, sold off with the rest of my pro equipment, but I’ve found a great substitute for it in my iPhone. Between Camera+, Tilt/Shift Generator and Perspective, I’ve got a pretty useful artistic tool with me everywhere I go.

Agave ;Dylan

Now, what does all this have to do with guns?

Quite a lot, actually.

My carry gun is currently either my Kel-Tec P3AT or my Sccy CPX-1. Neither would be considered a high-end tactical firearm, in fact either of them would probably blow up in to a fine plastic mist if I tried to put them through even the most basic of torture tests.

But I have at least one of them with me wherever I can, and that means they are currently the best self-defense gun for me. Is a Springfield EMP or a Sig P238 a better firearm? Maybe, probably, in fact. But I don’t own either one. What I do own I shoot, and what I practice with as well. I am confident that if, (God forbid), I need to use either one, my P3AT or Sccy will be the best guns I own.

Sometimes good enough is good enough

“Know thy enemy, know thyself, and you will be invincible.” 

– Sun Tzu

When I was a professional photographer, once someone found out what I did for a living, I’d usually at a party, “Say, I want to take better pictures, what kind of camera should I get?” 

My answer to this was always “Well, that depends. How many rolls of film do you shoot each week?”, which would usually end that part of the conversation as the would-be photographer grapples with the concept of shooting an entire 36-shot roll of film each week, much less more than one, where it was not uncommon for me to burn through two dozen rolls of HP5+ or TMZ covering just one high school basketball game. 

The point I was trying to make is that it’s not the camera that limits the photographer, it’s his or her ability to put in the time necessary to realize their vision and their desire to push their creativity that limits a photographer.

Looking back on this now, I realize my answer to the wannabe photogs was/is snarky and condescending: People want to take better pictures not to become the next Mark Seliger, they want to capture memories that are more evocative and aesthetic, something all of us share. 

Which brings me to practical shooting. I’m blessed/cursed to call Rio Salado Sportsmans Club my home range. It’s loaded to the gills with USPSA Grandmasters. It’s a blessing in that each match is challenging and exciting, but each match is meant to be challenging and exciting to shooters like Rob Leatham, Vic Pickett and Matt Burkett. 

This can (and does) discourage beginning shooters. Imagine cranking off the best golf drive in your life and then have Tiger Woods shoot behind you and out-drive you by 100 yards. 

The upside to this, though, is that in the words of The Chairman Of The Board, if I can make it there, I can make it anywhere. And  another great thing about shooting at Rio is the opportunity to participate and shoot in some 1st-class matches like the Desert Classic and Mystery 3 Gun, which bring in shooters from around the country. I get to meet some of the best shooters in the world, and the prize tables for each match can be really good

All of this explains why I’m shooting a laid-back, easy-to-shoot steel match with friends on a regular basis rather than the more difficult but less friendly USPSA matches at Rio. I like Rio: I do all my practicing there and I’ll still shoot a USPSA match there as often as I can, but right now, it’s important that I believe I can shoot well and do so when needed, even in the toughest of competitions. My practice sessions are there for me to prepare me physically, the steel matches are there to prepare me mentally. My standard for success needs to be me and the progress I have made, not the best shooters in the world can do.