Culture Clash

We’ve won the gun rights battle. We’re rolling things back (slowly… too slowly) but we are winning. The left is getting more and more radicalized (Linda Sarsour and Assata Shakur? REALLY?), and there will be a void open for the NRA or someone else to step into to and expand gun rights even further into ground that once belonged to the enemy.

We’ve won the battle. The war? The war continues, and wars are not won on the basis of winning battles, they’re won on the basis of holding territory and making it your¬†own.

We have regained (cultural) ground from our enemy. What are we doing to hold it and make it our own?

Cultures don’t change because the extremes get pushed out more and more, cultures change because, in the words of the Doobie Brothers, what were once vices are now habits. Gay marriage was once a vice. Now it’s the law of the land. Ditto with doobies (words are my business! ūüôā ) in Colorado and many, many other states..

Armed self defense was once considered a vice. It’s now a habit for millions and millions of people.

Let’s keep that going.

Do You Even Win, Bro?

An interesting comment was left on a gun-related Facebook group I belong to, regarding this photo.

I have acquaintances who still post “They’re Gonna Take Yer Guns!” crap every now and then.¬†It’s not that the sentiment doesn’t concern me – being of around the same age as (redacted), it does and ought to. It’s just that the strident sense of doom seems, well, out-of-touch now that things are bending our way.¬†It’s almost as if many of our number can’t get used to the notion of having a winning cause.

I agree 100%. American gun culture, quite frankly,¬†doesn’t know what winning feels like. We’ve been on defense for so long, since 1934 at the very least, we don’t know what it feels like when quiet, confident and practical armed self defense is as much of our culture as, say, fishing is. Yes, there are cranks who go out and protest fishing, but they’re looked on as cranks, not people who inspire other people to create “Million(-ish)¬†Mom Marches” and such.

We don’t know what it means to be our own¬†first responder, because we’ve abdicated that role to the .gov since¬†the Sullivan Act¬†or thereabouts. We have forgotten what it means to be in charge of our own destiny.

We need to re-learn such things, and quickly.

The NRA As Tribe.

If you’ve not read Neal Stephenson’s “Snow Crash” or “The Diamond Age”, you probably should. Both of those books describe a future where the post-Westphalian nation-state is either dead or dying, and the people of Earth have divided themselves up into “Phyles”.

Society in The Diamond Age is dominated by a number of phyles, also sometimes called tribes. Phyles are groups of people often distinguished by shared values, similar ethnic heritage, a common religion, or other cultural similarities. In the extremely globalized future depicted in the novel, these cultural divisions have largely supplanted the system of nation-states that divides the world today.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: We are in a new era of personal empowerment, the likes of which we haven’t seen since the printing press was introduced into western culture, and guns are a big part of that personal empowerment. Once you realize that by choosing to arm yourself, you no longer have to hope there will be an armed representative of society nearby when you’ll need one most: You have become your own first responder.

So if we’re sorting ourselves into tribes, why WOULDN’T we sort ourselves into a shared belief in secure self-reliance? And that’s what NRA membership provides for us: It’s a sign that yes, you are one of my people, my tribe. That’s why “Freedom’s clenched fist” is a powerful line. In this new world of identity politics, identifying for personal security is a powerful message indeed.

Moving Beyond The Fear.

From Threepers on the right to the Antifa on the left, there are way, WAY too many people other there right now who are itchin’ for a fight, and if their words and deeds keep escalating, that fight will surely happen.

Maybe it’s because I was sitting on the political sidelines for the Assault Weapons Ban, or maybe it’s my innate Canadian niceness, but fear has never been good at motivating me to do something, especially when it comes to gun-related things.

To quote Clint Smith, I have a gun. Why should I be afraid?

Now, should you be fearful of those who are afraid of you being armed? Yes, and rightly so. Is that the prevailing spirit inside red state America? Nope.

Blue states may vary.

Yes, the radical left is misbehaving. Dangerously so.

However, misbehavior on the other side does not demand misbehavior on our side. If you carry a gun on a consistent basis, you soon learn that de-escalation and avoidance are much better ways to deal with the threat of violence than angry harsh rhetoric and more violence.

Take¬†the actions of the Antifa from the macro-level down to the personal level: If the Antifa were a person and not a movement, how would we handle them? They say they want to stop us, with violence if necessary, and they’ve shown a propensity to use violence in the past. What does all the things we’ve learned about living our lives as armed citizens tell us we should do about them?¬†When do we de-escalate? When do use awareness and avoidance? Should should we use force, and if so, how much, and when?

We need to be very careful about which hill we choose to die on, because once the dogs of war have been let off the leash, it is very, very hard to bring them back.

More thoughts on this at Ricochet.com.

Silencer Shop Is Golden.

SIG Sauer SRD762QD

There are many others like it, but this one will eventually be mine.

I decided from the get-go that my .300 Blackout pistol would be built with an eye towards suppressing it, and now that I’ve made a smooth transition to a new job, I pulled the trigger and bought a SIG Sauer¬†SRD762QD from Silencer Shop.

Why the SIG? Well, a bunch of reasons…

  • SIG hired Kevin Brittingham to start up their suppressor line. That’s a big, big deal for me, because Kevin essentially created the modern suppressor market when he founded AAC.
  • Features-wise, it’s pretty much ¬†what I want. Two-thirds of the time, that can will be on my .300BLK pistol, and the other third of the time, I’ll plop it on to my .308 bolt gun and go shoot with it. I have a two-hour drive to the nearest range that’s over 200 yards long, so the long range game is a lower priority than it was when I had a long-distance range close by.
  • Price. The whole kit and kaboodle, with trust, stamp, barrel-turning on the bolt gun and an extra adapter/muzzle device came in at around $1100 bucks. Not bad. Could I have gotten more features with something more expensive like, say the titanium version of this can, or a Surefire can? Yep. Will this one work for now and in the future? Probably.

One thing that’s not in doubt is how easy it is to buy a can through the Silencer Shop. Their online cart worked just like every online store out there (something that’s not all that common in the gun biz…) and¬†thanks to their in-store kiosks, the post-purchase steps of fingerprinting, filling out the Form 4 and setting up the trust took just over a half an hour.

Unless you absolutely HAVE to have one of the silencers they don’t stock (and they stock quite a few..), buy your silencer from the Silencer shop. You won’t regret it.


Silencer Shop didn’t pay me a dime for this endorsement. All they did was provide a great price on a can and spectacular customer service after I did so, and I want to let other people know about what they did.

A Gun For All Seasons.

Me, three years ago:

Modularity means more than just backstraps, it means being able to build my gun, my way. I REALLY like what SIG is doing with the 320, but I’d take it one step further and just sell the serialized trigger group by itself, with no pieces parts in it all, much like an AR-15 lower is sold today.

GhostGuns.com, this month.

GhostGuns.com is in the process of developing an 80% FCG that will allow buyers to build their own P320 compatible clones by drilling/milling a few pin holes and trigger sections. The entire process should be achievable with someone with average skills and tools.

So with one of these “80%” trigger packs and a bunch of parts from Apex, Gray Guns, SIG Sauer, etc, you’ll not only have a pistol, you’ll have a pistol that’s built to your specifications and is almost infinitely expandable.

Cool.