Waiting For Godot. And the HPA.

I like what SilencerCo is doing here.

Purchase one of our silencers through a SilencerCo Dealer any time between February 1, 2017 and April 30, 2017 then click the link below to register your product and upload your proof of purchase.

GET THIS
You’ll then receive a custom code via email within 72 hours that’s good for up to $200 worth of free gear on SilencerCo’s web store – accessories, merchandise – you name it.

I’m actually shopping around for my first can right now, and this is a tempting deal because there are things like silencer covers, QD mounts, etc, that quickly drive up the price of what is already an expensive add-on for your gun.

SilencerCo is adapting to the market as the market changes. Cool.

Five Years Later, People Are Catching On.

Me, writing in December 2011:

I keep wondering why there aren’t more pistol-caliber short guns out there on the market.

There’s the Hi-Point which suffers from being a Hi-Point, there’s the Kel-Tec Sub2000 which suffers from being a Kel-Tec and also cannot be found for purchase within the lower 48. There’s the Taurus CT G2 which has yet to hit our shores, the Beretta CX4 Storm (which costs about the same as a dedicated 9mm AR), and then there’s all manner of lever action guns in all manner of calibers.

The Ruger LCP and LC9 proved that there was a market for upgraded and “name-brand” versions of guns inspired by Kel-Tec guns, and with the utter unavailiability of the Sub-2000 and the lack of competion in the carbine marketspace, maybe it’s time for Ruger to take a another look at the Ruger Police Carbine and update it for the 21st century with some rails and a folding stock.

And now 2017 is apparently the Year Of The Pistol Caliber Carbine.

This doesn’t surprise me at all. The pistol caliber carbine is pretty much a civilian version of a Personal Defense Weapon, or older still, the M1 Carbine. It’s the gun you grab when you need more than a pistol but don’t want / can’t use an AR-15 or bigger gun. If it works for police and the military, it should work for me, too, right?

Braise The Beef And Pass The Ammunition

Me, last year:

Gun Culture 1.0 was/is fairly respectable and respected: You could (well, until recently) own a gun for hunting and not be considered a “Gun Nut”. No one blinks at a copy of Field&Stream or Outdoor Life in a doctor’s office waiting room. Gun Culture 3.0 will be when no one blinks at a copy of Front Sight or The Tactical Journal in a waiting room.

Peoria, Arizona, today:

Modern Round is an exhilarating and empowering new entertainment concept for the adrenaline seeker in all of us. It’s part virtual shooting range meets part upscale lounge. You’ll experience state-of-the-art technology that feels as real as shooting a live gun. But instead of using live ammo, you’ll be at the center of a simulated world where you’re placed right into the action.

Seems to be like a cross between Gunsite, Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse and a Dave & Busters.

The “guntry club” is obsolete: Say hello to the drive-by restaurant.

Metrics Don’t Matter. Until They Do.

Metrics in firearms training are needed. When we’re at a range, we are training people to pass a test that will determine if they life or die, so why wouldn’t we want to see how well they’re doing at that sort of thing and track things like draw speed, accuracy under pressure and split times? That sort of thing becomes VERY important when bullets start flying.

The problem is, all the things that lead up to that point, the de-escalation, the awareness of a potential violent counter exist in a metric-free zone. There is no way to empirically judge how ticked-off a potential attacker is at any given moment, there are no ISO standards when it comes to how much beer is required to turn a milquetoast accountant into a raging berserker, and mastering the skills needed to not get into a fight in the first test is a very, very ambiguous task, one that relies more on intuition and (dare I say it) feelings than cold, hard facts.

Let’s face facts. The firearms training world is dominated by guys, and guys (Trigger warning: Cisgender, heteronormative stereotypes ahead!) tend to be more goal-oriented, left-brain types who crave metrics*, and we tend to like training that caters to our demand for ordered, “rational”progress. Is that the way it SHOULD be? Is that the way it will always be? Is that a good thing?

Dunno. But denying reality ain’t gonna get us to where we want to be.

Metrics matter to those who want to improve their skill because they give us goals to strive for. They don’t matter to people who want a gun to “feel safe”. To borrow from Kathy Jackson‘s excellent analogy of swimming lessons, most people learn to swim in order to not drown: It’s only a few people who take up competitive swimming as a hobby or career. It’s been decades since my last swimming lesson, but one thing I remember from all of my Red Cross-approved swimming lessons was that there were metrics, even for us wee small children. In order to move on to even the next level after dogpaddling, you had to prove to the instructor that you were capable of drown-proofing for XX minutes or could swim X^2 lengths of the pool in Y number of minutes using a variety of swimming styles.

And no one freaked out about how those requirement were discouraging students from learning how to stay safe in the water. The basic swimming classes gave enough info to not drown for those who needed such thing, and set up the next rung on the ladder for we Type A personalities who needed more.

It’s not No Standards / Standardize All The Things, it’s using standards to get better where standards can help, and leave them alone when they’re not needed.


* As pert of my long and varied job history, I’ve taken psych test after psych test during the hiring process, and they pretty much all show that I am almost perfectly balanced when in comes to left brain / right brain or rational / intuitive types of things. This means I crave metrics, but the metrics I crave are… weird. 🙂

The Levee Has Broken.

Olympic first. Del-Ton next?

A recent ad from Grab-A-Gun on Del-tons. Look at the prices!

Now the only question is, how big will be flood be?

Fear is a great motivator, and the fear of losing our right of self-defense drove a lot of gun sales over the last few years, and, let’s be honest, drove the growth of Gun Culture 2.0 as well.

What will happen to Gun Culture 2.0 now? Are we ready for a gun culture based on optimism and the continued growth of our right to keep and bear arms?

Do we even know what that looks like?

Firmware > Hardware.

Thinking more about this post, another similarity between guns now and computers in the early 80’s was how all the computer manufacturers out there were scrambling around for a piece of the consumer market, and how almost all of them missed the big picture.

Zenith (remember them?), Tele-Tech, KayPro, Commodore , Osbourne and IBM’s PC division were just a few of the big names in computers that are long-gone now. They focused on the machine, and it ended them.

Kinda feels like the pistol market today. We’ve got the equivalent of IBM with Glock, and then after that, there is, um, err, ahh. In 1984, there was dozens of companies trying to shoehorn their way into the PC-compatible market, and that’s what’s happening today. Avidity, Honor Defense, Hudson Manufacturing, Canik (and now CZ as well)… the list goes on an on, and all of them are all, if I may so, pretty much all the same.

Gun companies might learn a thing or two from how  a couple of computer companies made it out of the scrum of the 1980’s computer market, though.

Microsoft: Microsoft focused on the operating system, the HOW behind what made computers run, and now, (despite their best efforts) they’re still around and doing well.

Apple: Apple focused on the WHY we used computers, and they’re now the #1 company in the world.

We’re not even in the beginning stages of “how” when it comes to guns, but I’m willing to bet we will be, and soon. Extending computers into a “digital lifestyle” is how Apple became #1, and the reality of a consumer-level “armed lifestyle” isn’t even on the horizon for us.

Yet.

Yeah, So I Didn’t Go To SHOT This Year…

And I’m ok with it. I’m realizing that for me, it’s not about the guns, it’s about what you can do with them. I had the same attitude when I was a shooter (click click): My cameras were not the bleeding edge F4’s and 500ELX’s, I shot with an FM2 and a twenty year old 500CM. I didn’t really care about the gadgets I used to pictures, I cared about the pictures I was taking. If a gadget like a wireless strobe slave or a spot meter allowed me to take better pictures, it was useful. If not, I didn’t care about it.

SHOT Show is in the cards for me next year, though, and if things go right, it will be someone else paying the way. In the meantime, my hotel for the NRA AM is booked, so I’ll see everyone there instead.

And Alf, I’m buying dinner this time.

Musical Interlude.

Jello Biafra. A man ahead of his time. Everything he’s singing about here has come true in the past few years. And don’t get me started on “Holiday In Cambodia.”

Lawfully Armed Citizen Arrives On-Scene of Officer In Distress. What’s Expected To Happen Next, Happens.

Yep, the (legally) armed citizen saved the officer’s life. Again.

(Arizona Department of Public Safety) says the trooper was “ambushed” by a suspect who came from an unknown direction. The suspect shot the trooper at least once in the chest-shoulder area and fought the trooper to the ground.

A passerby stopped to render aid and the trooper asked for help. Officials say the driver went back to his car, grabbed a gun and shot at the suspect who was not following his commands to stop attacking the trooper. The suspect was killed.

Good shooting, Mr. Passerby. Next time, though, carry on your person when you’re in your car. It’s faster. And I hope you also never have to pay for a beer again for the rest of your life.

And, in the interests of fairness and equal time, I will now make a detailed, comprehensive list of all the times that a civilian member of the Coalition To Stop Gun Violence, the Brady Campaign and/or a supporter of Black Lives Matter has stopped an in-progress assault on a police officer.

There. Don’t ever say I’m not fair and balanced when it comes to the effectiveness of an armed vs. disarmed citizenry.