A Gun For All Seasons.

Me, three years ago:

Modularity means more than just backstraps, it means being able to build my gun, my way. I REALLY like what SIG is doing with the 320, but I’d take it one step further and just sell the serialized trigger group by itself, with no pieces parts in it all, much like an AR-15 lower is sold today.

GhostGuns.com, this month.

GhostGuns.com is in the process of developing an 80% FCG that will allow buyers to build their own P320 compatible clones by drilling/milling a few pin holes and trigger sections. The entire process should be achievable with someone with average skills and tools.

So with one of these “80%” trigger packs and a bunch of parts from Apex, Gray Guns, SIG Sauer, etc, you’ll not only have a pistol, you’ll have a pistol that’s built to your specifications and is almost infinitely expandable.

Cool.

 

… And I’m Looking For A Job Again.

Which sucks, because I really liked where I was working, but they ran out of money to pay me, and so out the door I went.

If you know of a job for a content manager who’s never missed a deadline or someone who knows WordPress like the back of his head, drop me a note.

Alter Call.

Most evangelists suck at evangelizing. If you go to a “revival”, you’ll see that if anyone is walking forward for redemption, it’s probably who has already been in the church for years and years.

That’s great (and needed) but it’s not really increasing the numbers of people inside the church, it’s just lowering the amount of people who leave.

Now let’s apply that to gun culture. Who are the evangelists? Who are the ones bringing new people into the fold, and who are the ones who are preaching revival? Many people preach “revival” but in reality, they’re just delivering the same message to the same people in the same pews, and then when one or two of them walk down the aisle to be saved, they call it a new movement in gun ownership.

The best analogy I can come up with is the “Jesus People” movement of the early 70’s, when the hippies realized that hey, there might be something to that preacher-man stuff they heard as kids, and they tried to go back to church, but the church, seeing the long hair and… questionable grooming habits of the hippies (not to mention that heathen rock n roll they listened to) rejected them.

Now, four decades later, the church is on the outside of American culture, looking in.

Now let’s look at gun culture.

Today, we have millions and millions of people who want to “feel safe” and bought a gun, but they’ve not integrated that gun into their everyday life. That’s something that needs to change, or else gun rights will go away if those people don’t understand that it’s THEIR right to protect themselves that’s under attack, not someone else’s right to go into the woods and blast Bambi, or something (and the reverse is true as well).

Tens of millions of casual gun owners is nice. A million people who are dedicated to proficiency with their weapon of choice and are passionate about keep the right to keep and bear arms alive is even better.

Begin with Agreement and work from there.

The “conversation about guns” is turning in our direction. Keep it going. People, even liberals, are starting to understand that they are their own first responder. Emphasize safety, both yours and everyone else’s. No one thinks you shouldn’t protect your kids. No one thinks that learning first aid is a bad idea. No one thinks that flashlights aren’t handy. Nobody freaks out over a Swiss Army knife, except over-enthusiastic enforcers of “zero tolerance” policies. Start with the points you agree on, then work from there. Make it personal. Talk about your family, and how your love for them drives what you’re doing. Bring it down from the 10,000 foot level of “SHALL NOT BE INFRINGED!” and the finer points of Constitutional Law to stories about why you want to stay safe. If they have a point that you agree on, like keeping guns out of the hands of violent felons or away from toddlers, agree with them, because it makes you and your positions more reasonable. Gun owners have been portrayed as wanting to shove guns into the hands of four year olds.

Prove them wrong.

Stand And Deliver… Sales.

Dear Acusport.

I love you. You know I do. You were our #1 vendor when I worked in the biz, and you have your @$#! together at a level that most other wholesalers only DREAM of having.

But.

You’re leaving cash on the table when it comes to accessories and weird special orders.

Special orders for a gun store are a nightmare. There is so much that can go wrong, and they take up so much time for so little profit. Researching the proper part number and then sending in an order for, say, a mag release button for a Glock 34 takes so much time,  a gun store will actually LOSE money on the sale, and if they say “We don’t do special orders,” they’ll lose the customer to Brownell’s or Midway.

Whether or not the customer has the time and willpower to navigate through those often-confusing sites is a topic for another day.

Instead of p!ssing off gun stores and customers alike, Acusport, why not turn yourself into the NFDN of gun parts, and set up in-store kiosks with all your stuff? Stores could set their own prices on their kiosks and then regulate which areas of your catalog they want to allow their customers to access. That way, if a customer comes in asking for all the weird stuff that customers ask for (but are a pain in the @$$ to stock), they can buy it at their local gun store and get it shipped right to them, and the gun store makes as much (or more) money off the process than they would have in the first place.

Oh, and as an added bonus, maybe have VOIP built into the shopping app (and a headset with video) so you can do the customer service as well. Net cost to you: A cheapo Android tablet and headset. Net benefit: More sales for you, and more sales for the gun stores who will have a steady stream of customers coming in to use the app.

You’re welcome.

Gimme A Sec.

Between the hectic pace of life these past few months and Monday’s devastating news, my heart just isn’t in it right now.

One of the things I talked with Paul Carlson about last weekend was the bitterness inside the firearms community. Yes, there are people out there whose purpose in life is to be used as reactor shielding, but other than that, there really is more that unites us rather than divides us. In talking with Paul on Saturday and Sunday, I realized that I had become that which I had most feared, I was one of the dividers, and I decided Sunday night to change how I treated people inside the business.

And then Monday happened, and my pettiness shone even brighter.

To quote the irreplaceable David Lee Roth, the trick to life is to not sweat the small stuff, and to realize that it’s all small stuff.

Enjoy life here while it lasts. It’s not going to happen again.