The iPTS Funding Campaign Launches Tomorrow!

Introducing The Interactive Pistol Training System

Rubber, meet road. Road, rubber.

We’ve been getting some great feedback and a lot of interest from shooters, law enforcement and military, and some…. not so great feedback as well.

To the Facebook commenter who compared us to “Duck Hunt” on the Nintendo: There is a reason why all the shots from your .40 cal HiPoint  go low-left, and it has a lot to do with how you view dry-fire. Deal with it.

I digress.

Anyway, go check out the campaign page and watch as it changes tomorrow, and remember, if you want the best deal on an iPTS, get in on the ground floor.

Return Fire.

My local coffee shop, like oh so many other local coffee shops around the country, has a customer loyalty card. I buy 10 ten drinks to feed my caffiene habit, and the 11th one is free.

Quick, what is your local gun shop doing to keep customers coming back? Does it have an email list? Does it advertise specials on social media?

Heck, does it advertise at all?

We’ve had seven, heck, make it ten fat years. At least seven lean years are coming.

If you’re not ready for them now, it’s probably too late.

Security Hub

The P.C. was supposed to be dead in 2001, and yet Apple turned it into the center of their success by making everything else in our lifestyle revolve around the P.C. Apple came out with its “digital hub” strategy before it came out with their stores, before it came out with the iPod, before it became the Apple we know today.

Want to play music? Pop open iTunes and either blast it out through your Sonos or sync up your iPod. Digital camera? iPhoto. Camcorder? iMovie. Want to bring it all together? Use iDVD to put in on disk and send it to your friends. Apple is in the lead right now because they’ve been living the idea that a computer (or similar device) is not the focus of your life, it just a tool to help you live your life more fully. This is the strategy that launched the iPod, the iTunes Music Store, the iPhone and all the other gadgets that have made Apple the #1 company in the world.

Now let’s talk about guns. Who is coming up with a “digital hub” strategy for personal security? People have a generalized, non-specific fear that they’re “not safe”. They’re aware of this, and they want to “feel safe”. Re-watch that video and see how Steve Jobs talks about the gadgets and tools he’s selling… iPhoto lets you do this, Macs let you do something else, and iTunes lets you listen to music. He’s not talking about how cool Apple’s tools are, he’s talking about how cool your life will be if you use Apple’s tools.

How cool will your life be if you “feel safe”, if you don’t need to have that non-specific fear that something “isn’t right?” There are trainers out there like Joshua Gideon, Paul Carlson, Jeff Street and others who offer online and personal security tips to go along with their gun tips, and that’s an avenue we need to look into as well.

There has got to be something out there that’s in-between the “SEVEN SECRET SHOOTING TIPS OF THE NAVY SEALS” marketing out there. There are other trainers out there with that avoid such hype and bluster, but then leave their students stranded two-thirds of the way up Mount Stupid, without an understanding of what metrics will get them over the top.

There has be something that makes derp-free personal security seem cool. We just haven’t found it yet.

Ruger LCP II 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 384 – 446

I spent some more quality time with the LCP ][, getting used to using it as a carry gun. I concentrated on doing Tueller drills with it, from the pocket, with and without my hand on the gun, and mixing in a few Mozambiques as well.

I was kinda happy that I was consitently able to get off two shots into the Down Zero area within 2.5 seconds with my hand out of my pocket, and 1.5 seconds with my hand on the gun in my pocket.

I’ll take it.

As for the test itself, I shot a bunch of Lucky Gunner’s ammo (and you should shoot their ammo too), and I encountered one Failure To Feed on the 400th round, shooting PMC Bronze.

Rounds Fired : 62
50 Rounds PMC Bronze
12 Rounds Hornady Critical Defense

Total Rounds Fired: 484. One possible failure to feed on round 116, one failure to feed, round 400.

Armed? Who, me?

I’ve got a family trip coming up to a couple of Orlando theme parks that use metal detectors and bag searches to make sure they’re “weapons-free” zones.

Uh-huh.

I’m not planning on carrying a firearm with me into the parks, but I do want to carry a knife with me because a knife is useful for more than just defending your life.

After a few searches and reading a few blogs that I trust, I settled on the Boker Plus 01BO010 credit card knife.

The knife is skinny and hides easily. It is, essentially, your daily carry folding knife’s anorexic midget cousin. Without the clip, it’s just a few millimeters wide, and the size is very conducive to carrying inconspicuously.

That’s the new Boker next to my usual covert carry knife, a CRKT Pazoda 2, and a AA battery on the right. The blade on the Boker is taller and longer than the Pazoda, but the handle is a little shorter, which means I can only grip it with two fingers instead of three. Yes, that is an issue, but no, I’m not too worried about it. This is not a fighting knife, as it takes me two hands to open, but it is very useful thing to have with you because it’s a knife, and knives are handy.

The blade is 440-C stainless, and out of the box, it was quite dull. This did not please me, but a few moments with a sharpener solved that problem.

Did I mention it’s easy to conceal? Believe it or not, the Boker is in this photo, tucked in between a couple of dollar bills.

What’s the first rule of camouflage? Help the people see what they’re expecting to see, and in this case, the aluminum in my Ridge wallet will set off the metal detector, along with the metal in the knife.

Overall, I’m very happy with this knife. Yes, there were other, more covert options out there that are better fighting knives, but I’m not really too concerned about fighting my way through the line for “It’s A Small World”. Rather, I want a knife with me because of all the other things a knife can do, and this little Boker seems about right for that job.

Musical Interlude

I didn’t go see The Police when they re-united and toured a few years ago, because I wanted to remember them as when I first saw them, 0ver 35 years ago, playing in a hockey arena in small city on the edge of the Canadian Rockies.

I didn’t go, because I didn’t want to see my heroes get old.

But New Order? I’ll go see New Order any time, anywhere.

A Good Knife.

To be honest, I will never understand people who leave the house without a knife, phone and a flashlight. Unless you work in a non-permissive environment like behind TSA lines or in a school, it only makes sense to carry around a sharp edge, along with some way of seeing in the dark and a means of communicating beyond yelling at the top of your lungs.

Oh, and a lighter would also be a good idea as well, because being able to start a fire is never not handy.

Part of the problem is, when people say “I want a good knife,” we recommend a tactical folder to them or a confusing mulittool when all they really wanted was something cheap and pointy.

Enter the Opinel folding knife. I got turned on to these almost thirty years ago by a knife-loving friend of mine, and I’ve tried to keep one nearby as often as I could.

opinel_1

The Opinel knife has changed very little since it was introduced almost 100 years ago. It has a simple, twist-lock design that keeps it closed when not needed or when it’s open, and that’s about it. It’s not the easiest knife in the world to open (it usually takes me both hands to open mine), but what it does, it does very, very well.

opinel_2

The blade is sharp. DANG sharp, and the handle fits comfortable in your hand. If you’re looking for a cheap, everyday utility knife, skip the cheap Chinese imports and go with something that’s been around for a hundred years.

“Half The Store Is Devoted To Solutions”.

“Because people don’t just want to buy personal computers anymore, they want to know what they can do with them.”

This. This is how Apple took over the world. They realized, faster than Microsoft did, that computers were not something we used just at the office, they were becoming part of our lives.

Apple did this, and now they own the retail world.

Who is devoting half of their gun store to HOW you use a gun? Anyone?

Why not?

Is there anything, anything at all inside your gun store that gives hints about what you can DO with your guns, now that you’ve bought one?

Why not?