Cajun Gun Works Does Nice Stuff.

Yes, they do take a while to do it, but they turn out really good stuff when they’re done.

I ran into an issue with my P-07 earlier this year: The firing pin in the darn thing wouldn’t pop primers, and I didn’t have a pistol so much as a lightweight polymer club. I had been wanting to change out the sights in it for a while, because the Meprolight night sights on it kinda sucked (the front sight is monstrous and fills up most of the rear notch, making precision shooting with it pretty much impossible. I wanted something that mimicked the same sight picture I got when I shot Bob Vogel’s gun last year, and Cajun Gun Works’ EZ/D sight set looked pretty much the same, so I decided to kill two birds with one FedEx box and send off my P07 to them for repair and new sights.

I’ll have to wait until the weekend to test how well the gun works now, but the new sights are terrific. Clear and precise, with is nice, deep sight rear notch that makes it easy to find the fiber-optic front sight.

CZ P07 Competition sights

Finding a good set of sights for this gun has been a challenge, as it is for any gun with a less-than-Glock market share, but if you’re looking for competition sights for your P-07, take a look at Cajun Gun Works EZ/D sights.

Definable, Verifiable, Logical, Repeatable.

MAG Qualifier

One of things I liked about my MAG40 class was that the Qualifier at the end of the class is based on police qualifiers from around the country, and the that your results on the test are documented by the instructor at the end of the class.

This may not seem like much, but if, God forbid, you do need to use a gun in defense of a life and are taken to court afterwards, wouldn’t it be nice to have some hard, verifiable data about how effective a marksman you are versus an instructor who shuns standardized testing testifying that you’re a pretty decent shooter.
Or something. Which is good, until opposing counsel produces THEIR expert witness who shreds the testimony of said instructor like it’s pulled pork at a Carolina barbecue.

Documented test results are not subject cross-examination. They stand on their own accord, and a mighty ally to have on your side during a courtroom cage match, and the CSI Effect can have a strong effect on juries.

This was one of the reasons why I shot the test with my carry gun and holster, not a competition gun. Could I have scored better with one of the CZ-75’s I shoot in USPSA Production? Sure. Do I carry that gun? Nope. Shooting this test with my carry gear helps me establish what my baseline is for street work. My baseline for pistol bay work is established by my USPSA and IDPA Classifier scores (which, to be truthful, need some help).

After Action Report: MAG40 At Safety Solutions Academy

“Front sight, crush grip and a smooth roll on the trigger is the last cheat sheet before the ultimate final exam.”
– Massad Ayoob

I was trying to define why I wanted to take this class, but I can’t do a better job than how my friend Tam described it, “A MAG40 class from Massad Ayoob,” she said, “is one of the stations of the cross for people seriously interested in developing their ability with the defensive pistol.” Massad has been writing about and teaching the defensive pistol for decades now, and he is THE person when it comes to dealing with the legal after-effects of using a pistol to defend your life. Let’s face it, we lost Rauch, we lost Cooper, we lost Cirillo and the number of trainers like Massad Ayoob, who have been there from the very start, is growing smaller with each passing year.
The class was hosted by Paul Carlson of Safety Solutions Academy. The range portion was taught at The Southington Hunt Club by David Maglio, a veteran law enforcement officer and senior instructor with the Massad Ayoob Group, and the classroom legal stuff was taught at a nearby hotel meeting room by Mas himself.

MAG20 Range Practice

The Range: MAG20 Live Fire

The first day started off with training safety, stances, grip… the usual stuff. I came into this class not expecting to learn something new during the range portion, but I was pleasantly surprised when I learned how to significantly improve my strong-hand only/weak-hand only shooting, something that’s eluded for me YEARS. The MAG20 qualifier is based on elements from various police qualification courses and to be honest, it’s not that hard. I was more handicapped by my out-of-date prescription lenses than I was by the course of fire. Nevertheless, I managed to shoot 96% on it with my tiny little S&W Shield, a feat that I am somewhat proud of.

The Classroom: MAG20 Armed Citizens Rules Of Engagement.

Let’s face it: 99% of what we know about how to defend ourselves in the courtroom after a defensive gun use comes from what Massad Ayoob has been teaching all these years, and I had heard much of it before. However, just because you’ve listened to a lot of rock and roll, it doesn’t mean you understand how good Chuck Berry really was, and Massad Ayoob is the Chuck Berry of defending the use of lethal force in self-defense inside the courtroom. The advice he gave out in class was simple, sound and is rooted in years and years of defending the legal use of self-defense in our nation’s courts. One thing that I learned in the MAG20 classroom made so much sense, I thought I’d share it here.
We’ve heard, over and over again, not to use hand-loaded ammunition in our self-defense guns, but what I never knew before this class was WHY.
The answer is quite simple: If (God forbid) we need to defend a life with our gun, our gun and the ammunition it contains will become evidence, and the court may need to replicate the circumstances surrounding our defensive gun use, up to and including shooting similar guns using similar ammunition to replicate the circumstances before, during and after we pulled the trigger.
With factory ammo, this is not a problem, as example rounds are kept of each case lot of ammo at the factory, but how do we replicate a hand load without the defendant (us) pulling the handle on the press? Could that be an issue in a defensive gun use that might invalidate evidence that would otherwise free us for the court’s grasp?

You bet it is.

I was also pleased that Massad’s comment about the influx of military trainers into the United States mirrors my own thoughts. As he put it, “A whole lot of the wartime rules of engagement do not apply to armed civilians and law enforcement inside the United States.” Not that there’s anything wrong with learning from someone who’s been in the military, but if, say, you take a course in Medieval Spanish literature, don’t be surprised when it doesn’t help you order up some food in a backstreet cantina in Hermosillo.
You may think that a class like this is something for the hard core student of the gun, but you’d be wrong. In our class of nine, there was one guy, Javier, who had never taken a firearms training class of any kind before in his life. His progression as a shooter over the two days on the range was a joy to watch, and he was hailed at the end of the class as the most-improved person in the class because, well, he was.
If Javier can do it, so can you, and that’s just one of the reasons why I’d recommend taking a MAG40.

Not Invented Here Syndrome.

Thinking more about yesterday’s post, it really is no surprise that the NRA chose to play up the military backgrounds of their new instructor corps rather than go with people who have a verifiable history with training we civilians, because let’s face it, the NRA just doesn’t play nice with others. We’ll ignore (for now), the rather graceless way they kicked out the U.S. Concealed Carry Association from the Annual Meeting this year, and instead, go back to the ILA’s involvement in the attempts to improve our gun rights ten years ago. The NRA’s impact on D.C. v. Heller was, to say the least, nominal (and to say the worst, harmful), and they followed that up with an attempt to muscle in on McDonald v. Chicago.

In the minds of the NRA, there is no reason to acknowledge the existence of Gunsite or Cornered Cat or Lethal Force Institute in the CV’s of their new top-notch trainers, because, I’m guessing, that might put the thought in people’s heads that the NRA in and of itself is not the sole source of civilian firearms training. It’s pretty similar to when I went to Front Sight: If you go to that range, you will never hear about how Jeff Cooper invented the color code or anything about any other training except what’s done at Front Sight. This is NOT the way to build a robust training program that adapts to the customer’s needs. It is, however, an excellent way to move your customers two-thirds of the way up Mount Stupid and leave them stranded there, possibly in danger of their lives.

Look, I like the NRA. I write for the NRA. I’m an NRA member, and the NRA has done and is doing a lot of great stuff for our right to defend ourselves from harm. However, the NRA is no more the sole protector of that right of self-defense than AAA is the sole voice for everyone who drives a car. The sooner the NRA learns to play nice with others, the better off we’ll be.

This Was The Gun That CZ Was Supposed To Make, But Springfield Did Instead.

Springfield has come out with a DA/SA subcompact. The problem is, this was the gun that I told CZ to make.

In a world where a seven pound pull and a break not unlike a staple gun is considered great and long ten-pound DAO triggers are not unheard of, a polymer gun with a nine-pound first pull / five pound second would become a shooter’s best friend. Team that up with a spring system that allows for easy slide manipulation and the ergonomics you’re already known for, CZ, and you’d take over the market.

I’ll have more once I get to fondle it on the floor today, but my first impression is, that is one mother-ugly gun. It looks like someone hand-washed a Hi-Point and it up and shrunk on them.

Springfield’s Coming Out With Something New At NRA

’bout time.

From their press release:

Attendees will be the first to see an all-new Springfield Armory® pistol platform at the upcoming 2017 National Rifle Association Annual Meeting and Expo when convention hall doors open at 9 a.m., Friday, April 28, 2017.

Now, the company is poised to offer the next major addition to its broad and diverse handgun family. Designed to offer specific benefits that solve persistent handgun user challenges, the new platform brings a unique set of features that enhance usability and ease of operation.

Thanks Springfield, that told us absolutely NOTHING about what you’re coming out with at NRA. Fortunately, they did include a video, with some guy named Leatham, who I hear is a pretty good shooter or something.

Judging by the video above and screen captures below, it appears to be a small, thin, 1911 style pistol with a fiber optic front sight, Novak-style rear sight and a rail of some sort. Recoil seems feisty, so it may be chambered in 9mm or even .45, rather than .380ACP

Reports of a grip zone remained unconfirmed at this time.

Anyways, I’ll be looking at it at NRA, as will a number of other people, I suppose.

New Springfield 1911

Introducing a new springfield

Concealed Carry Needs An On-Ramp

Or at least, a better on-ramp than what we have now. We say “Carry your guns, people, it’s a lighter burden than regret!” and then we do nothing to actually help people get used to carrying a gun.

We ask them to run a marathon, without teaching how to prepare for a marathon.

Fortunately, there’s at least one training team that’s doing something about that problem, and their model could change “Gun Culture 2.0” forever.

Go check them out at Ricochet.com.

A Very Personal Gun Free Zone

We gun owners are so funny. We moan and b!tch about “gun free zones”, and yet we do little, if anything, to help the people who bought all those guns over the last few years do anything about carrying said guns with them them every day, thus eliminating the “gun free zones” within their own lives.

I talk more about the utter lack of an on-ramp in-between buying a pistol, getting your concealed carry permit and actually carrying the darn thing around with you on a day-in, day-out basis over at Ricochet.com.

Go check it out.

 

TacCon, MAG40, iPTS

I talked with Paul Carlson on the Safety Solutions podcast about his experience at Tactical Conference this year, why people should take advanced training like a Massad Ayoob class, and how the Interactive Pistol Training System will change the world and clean up your acne.

Okay, one of those two.

      Go check it out
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Talk About The Passion.

Maybe it’s former missionary in me, but I am FAR more concerned about bringing people into gun culture who own guns and don’t use them than I am about talking about TV shows like “Super Blastomatic Presents THE WORLDS BEST SHOOTERS DOING COOL STUFF YOU CAN’T” or “GO SHOOT THINGS IN THE WOODS, SPONSORED BY REDNECK CAMPING GEAR”.

The choir has heard the message before, and they don’t care.

One thing I’ve been encountering as I wade through the flotsam and jetsam of the “establishment” conservative movement over at Ricochet is that we conservatives have very little understanding of the importance of narrative. Establishment conservatives are upset that Trump won, and they can’t understand that Trump won because he created a narrative and stuck to it. No position paper or think tank has EVER won an election, but passion? Passion wins elections.

To bring this home to American Marksman and Big Guns (to name a couple of shows), there is plenty of passion for the shooting sports amongst competitors, but precious little concern for the other competitors in the sport. This is one of the reasons why USPSA, 3 Gun, et al, is stuck in a rut, because only people who compete in those sport watch a competition for the sake of the competition itself. The rest of us watch a competition to cheer on the heroes and boo the villains. Shooting competitions need heroes, and they need villains, currently, they have neither. Top Shot gave us heroes and villains, and it was the most-popular competitive shooting show ever made. Top Shot made the show about the competitors, not the competition, and it was popular beyond the shooting world.

And that’s not a coincidence.