Attention, Practical Shooting Organizations.

USPSA, IDPA, 3 Gun Nation, Rimfire Challenge, the whole lot of you.

Now is your chance.

The NFL is self-immolating itself, and the NBA and Major League Baseball are right behind them. They’ve decided that that 50% of the country shouldn’t be watching them play sports, so all of you have a great opportunity to step into the void.

How many of your top-level competitors are former military? How many are current law enforcement?

What are the odds that people who are ticked off by the shenanigans of the NFL would look up to the patriotism of such people?

Is there is a chance that 50% of the country might like to watch a sport where athletes are really and truly role models?

Get to work. You have until the NFL pre-season starts next year to make some hay off of this.

And if you need a hand getting it done, my email address is over there —>.

Building a Better, Quieter Mousetrap.

Maxim 50

Mere words cannot describe the geniusness of this product. It’s like a big, giant middle finger showed in the face to the National Firearms Act.

50-state-legal sound suppression is now a reality thanks to SilencerCo’s integrally-suppressed muzzleloader, the Maxim 50. No fingerprints, no pictures, no $200 tax stamp, no 4473, no wait. Mailed directly to your door. Even in California. Yes, really.

That scrunching noise you hear are knickers twisting en masse inside the offices of gun control groups all across this great land.

The fact that their ad campaign prominently shows the Golden Gate bridge and the Santa Monica pier is just rubbing it in. All that’s missing for Blue State Triple Yahtzee is a shot of someone holding one in Times Square and Michigan Avenue.

So, what’ll be the over/under on how soon Bloomberg and his minions talk about this as a “COMPLETELY SILENT .50 CALIBER LONG RANGE GHOST CLIP SNIPERS RIFLE IMMUNE TO MICROSTAMPING!!!1!!”?

Hint: Take the under.

Further proof that the gun industry treats stupid legislation as damage and routes around it.

You Don’t Need Something Like That. Until You Do.

Tam talks about how much fun it is to go to a tactical carbine course.

I know people who take butt-tons of carbine classes because, face it, running and gunning with an AR or AK, especially on targets in the 7-to-50 yard range, is fun as hell.

Which is not to say that there wasn’t a ton of value in what I spent last week doing, because any time you get a chance to have to think on your feet while armed and move safely around other armed people and make decisions with a gun in your hand is time well-spent. Working tactics in the house is a different animal altogether from doing marksmanship stuff on the square range.

That got me thinking.

I’ve bagged on such courses in the past, and I still think that they should not be a priority for the average citizen who owns guns. If you have never taken a post-CCW pistol class and have no idea how to set a tourniquet, a carbine class shouldn’t be your first choice.

But let’s stop and think for a second. My neighbor across the street from me is a recently retired 82nd Airborne veteran, and another neighbor the next street over is a former LA County Sheriff.

A carbine class, especially a low-light carbine class that would teach me how to act in conjunction with my neighbors who once got paid to shoot people in the face for a living, suddenly seemed to be a very good idea as I was sitting on my front porch during the darkness of a post-Irma curfew on Monday night, as did some sort of body armor and chest rig. I have a IIIA soft plate, so it might not be a bad idea to get another and also something to hold them close to my body.

Nobody needs such things. Until they do. And given that Category 3 hurricanes are not an uncommon event here in SW Florida, it might behove me to learn how to use an AR-15 more better, and use learn how to use it in conjunction with my friends who know how to use them as well.

Team Colors

Thinking a little more about this post from awhile ago, why are sponsored shooter jerseys so devoid of branding? Sig did a decent job with their team, but other than that, you have the blue and black S&W jerseys which look totally different than the blue and black Taran Tactical jerseys which look nothing like the blue and black Mossberg jerseys…

You get the point.

Part of the reason is that there are very few shooters sponsored by just one company: Rob Leatham shoots for Springfield and Julie Golob for S&W, yet they are both part of Team Safariland.

No, I don’t get that either.

Maybe manufacturers would get better results from their sponsorship efforts into better, more eye-catching jerseys, rather than getting lost in see of look-alike templates.

Let Your Run Be Run And Your Gun Be Gun.

This looks like fun. Exhausting, to be sure, but fun nevertheless.

Dropzone Gunner (DZG) is a once-in-a-lifetime event meant to combine extreme physical conditions along with the ability to operate a variety of weapons. Run, hurdle, jump, shoot. This is a “battlefield pickup” scenario event. All weapons will be staged and ready for you. Yes, we realize you may have a favorite rifle that is worth $10k with $23k worth of extras on it that you would prefer to use. This is not that type of event. You use whatever is in front of you. The art of surprise along with the ability to troubleshoot and manage whatever you come across is vital in this event.

A few things of interest here…

  1. The guns are all staged guns, and they’re all Kel-Tecs. Now we can have the discussion about Kel-Tec quality at another time, but this is a big deal. All guns from one manufacturer? When has that happened before?
  2. I really like the format. Way to appeal The Spartan Race crowd, people!
  3. The prize table is supposedly very, very good, with guns galore and (wait for it) cash as well. FN and SIG may have shut down their teams, but lawd almighty, this looks like a heck of a match.

 

Ruger LCPII 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 837 – 937

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge

No photos of the target today, because my phone decided to lock up in the 95° Florida heat. It’s a shame because I concentrated on shooting for groups this time out, and the LCP][ responded with 2″ five-shot groups from 7 yards. Not bad for a little gun with essentially no sights and a very short sight radius.

I finished up the session with 30 or so rounds shot from retention, right up against the target then shooting while backing up as fast as I can, kinda like what Craig Douglas is doing here.

Kinda.

Because I tend to shoot on indoor ranges or at matches, where shooting from retention is rarely mandated, I actually have very little experience with it. Yes, that’s a training scar, and yes, I’m trying to do something about it.

Other than that, the little LCP][ just soldiered on. I was struck again just how easy it is to shoot strong hand only: There really is little for the support hand to do on the gun, and because it’s lightweight with a decent trigger, it really doesn’t need a support hand to get a quick round off and onto the target. I did have one Failure To Feed on round 36 out of 100 while shooting PMC Bronze.

Rounds Fired : 100
70 Rounds PMC Bronze
30 Rounds Winchester FMJ White Box

2000 Round Challenge Results
Total Rounds Fired: 937.
One possible failure to eject on round 116, two failures to eject on rounds 400 and 489, one failure to feed round 873.

Conflict Of Interests

First off, kudos to Glock for turning the fifth time they’ve had to update Perfection™ into a major gun event.

It’s a good idea, and a great way to get the fanboys excited for something outrageously innovative, like sights that are actually useful or getting rid of those STUPID finger grooves.

But.

It’s also the same night as the Macgregor-Mayweather fight.

Think that a large part of Glock’s target market is going to more interested in the fight than being the first to shoot a new gun?

Me too.

Update: We have photos of the new gun! It’s, umm, well, a Glock! Without finger grooves! And with a high-tech innovative feature called “an ambidextrous slide release”.

Something that other guns have had for decades prior to this, but now, they’ve perfected it!

Perfect 5th.

Odds And Sods.

I spent a bunch of my ill-botten gooty from the Amazon links on the site and bought a few things to make my life easier. Thanks for your support, everyone, now on to some quick first takes:

SOG Folding Entrenching Tool 

I’ve been needing to get shovels for the back of our family’s cars, so when these came on sale, I snatched up two of them for just just over fifteen bucks.

Not bad.

It’s a basic aluminum entrenching tool, with a twist-lock handle and saw-blade edge and pick on one side and shovel on the other. Nothing fancy, but it’s a tool that infantrymen have been using for decades now, so it should work for us civilians, too.

Gosky Universal Cell Phone Mount

I bought this because I thought it looked cool, and hey, you never know, it may come in handy someday. Because it’s a “universal” mount, however, it’s a little awkward to use with my spotting scope, and it doesn’t work too well with my rifle scopes either because the eye relief is too long.

Image quality from the mount is below par, probably because the optics needed to make a clear image on the back of the eye are different than the optics needed to produce an image on a camera sensor. Still, for just $19, it’s a lot of fun to play around with.

Esbit Folding Stove

I love these little stoves. No, they are not going to cook up a five-course meal for fourteen, but they’ll heat up water for coffee or a freeze-dried instant meal. I’ll have a more in-depth look at this stove when I test it out with this gadget, but for now, I likey.

The Short, Happy Life Of Tactical Timmy*.

Maybe one of the things that makes the SpecOps lifestyle so attractive to we in Gun Culture 2.0 is because they tell really, really good stories, and that’s important to us.

We need heroes. We need to aspire to be something that’s more than we are right now, and let’s face it, there are very few really extraordinary armed civilians out there. Most of them are schlubs like me, and that’s totally cool. I’m not all that extraordinary, and quite honestly, neither or most of my friends.

But Green Berets, MARSOC, Navy SEALS? Them’s extraordinary people who tell extraordinary stories.

Gun Culture 1.0 had extraordinary hunters who went to far-off strange places and turned out some great hunting stories from their exploits.

Is it any wonder, then, that we in Gun Culture 2.0 idolize the men of today who go off to far-off strange places and do extraordinary things in order to keep us safe at home?


* Bonus points if you got the literary reference in the title…