Why Not Go Full Call Of Duty?

Why Not Go Full Call Of Duty?

Just spitballin’ here, but after watching how much fun Dropzone Gunner was, what would happen if the practical shooting sports fully embraced video games, rather than keeping them at arm’s length? Would a match that specifically highlighted the guns of say, GoldenEye, Rainbow Six or Call of Duty attract the gamer crowd and encourage crossover into practical shooting, especially if the stages designed to be as close to the actual game levels as possible? What if the match were held at the Boulder Gun Club in Vegas the weekend before CES., and Battlefield Vegas was cajoled/paid to provide some props and stage guns?

Could that bring a lot more attention to the practical shooting from media sources who wouldn’t normally DREAM about covering USPSA, IDPA or 3 Gun?

Something to think about.

The Year In Guns

The Year In Guns

It’s been a good year this year. I’ve managed to bring in a decent amount of side-job money, and that meant I had the wherewithal to buy myself some toys.

First up is the .300BLK pistol that I wrote up for Shooting Illustrated. I’ve tweaked it a bit with a Vickers sling and whatnot, and I like shooting it quite a lot.

Next is my suppressor for that gun, a SIG Sauer SRD762-QD. With wait times steadily falling on NFATracker.com, I expect to have it in-hand around March, if not a little sooner.

I hope.

I then put the Mossberg 930SPX that I had been using for 3 Gun out to pasture in favor of it’s gamer cousin, the 930 JM Pro. More competition is in the cards for me later this year, and so this gun will have a baptism by fire in the near future.

Smith and Wesson had a fire-sale on the first-edition 9mm Shields, and I picked up without a safety to replace the one I was carrying which had a safety. With the bladed trigger and other bits, there’s really no reason for an external safety on the Shield, and the darn thing is so small, it’s tough to flick off if accidentally switched on. Better not safety than sorry, I believe…

Lastly, I upgraded my 3 Gun AR with a new hand guard from Midwest Industries and an anodized aluminum stock from LeadStar Arms. That bloomin’ (literally) Bushnell red dot is leaving soon, probably swapped out for a Holosun dot.

As I said, a good year. Better than most.

See you in 2018!

Ruger Did It Again.

Ruger Did It Again.

First, it was ripping off my idea for a slogan, now they’re ripping off my ideas for guns.

Me, five years ago:

Bring Back The PC-9

A few reasons.

  • There are very few inexpensive but nice 9mm carbines. There’s the Beretta CX4, and then my choices are pricey (9mm upper), average (Kel-Tec Sub2k) or charitably low-end (Hi-Point).
  • Caracal’s coming out with one, so is Tavor and Saiga’s got a new one too. If there weren’t the demand for them, they wouldn’t make ’em. Speaking of which…
  • “Tactical Carbine/Shotgun” matches are popping up all over the place, allowing people shoot 3 Gun-style matches without having to deal with rifle-strength targets or have a 300+ yard range nearby.
  • A 9mm Carbine makes a dandy home-defense long gun, giving you the increased control and added thump of more muzzle velocity of a long gun without the over-penetration worries of a rifle-caliber carbine.
  • And it makes a dandy bug-out gun, too. Having to carry around one kind of ammo and carry one set of magazines makes a lot of sense when you’re dealing with limited space and weight. A 9mm carbine maxes out at about 100 yards, but that’s all you’ll be likely to need in anything other than a complete and total “SHTF” scenario.

Memo to Ruger: Take the PC-9, slap on the furniture from your tactical Mini-14, and you’re there.

Ruger, today:

Ruger 9mm Carbine

I need to send them an invoice for services rendered. This is getting ridiculous.

If this carbine comes in anywhere near Kel-Tec Sub2000 prices, they have a winner on their hands. And considering that 90% of the tooling for this gun probably already exists, it just might do exactly that.

UPDATE: The post is now live at Recoil. $549 MSRP, so expect to see street prices starting about $100 below that. Takes 10/22 trigger components.  Wowza. This is a) a shot across the bow of Kel-Tec and b) going to put some serious price pressure on the 9mm AR market.

Product Review: Holosun HS503C 2 MOA Circle Red Dot Sight

Product Review: Holosun HS503C 2 MOA Circle Red Dot Sight

red dot with circle reticuleAdvantages: Always on, great reticle, long battery life
Disadvantages: Finicky battery compartment
Rating: 5 out of 5

I was shooting a 3 Gun match a few years ago, and I discovered, much to my chagrin, that I had forgotten to turn on my red dot sight before I placed it in the staging barrel, meaning I had to take a few extra seconds to turn it on before I proceeded to shoot the stage. This was embarrassing at a match, but potentially lethal if I needed to defend myself with my rifle.

So I decided to try out some options. First up was a Sigtac CP1 3x scope which did the job, but the reticle was far too confusing for serious work. I then swapped that out on my SU16 for the Leupold 1.5-4x scope I originally got for 3 Gun, and it’s working out just fine.

But that left out my .300 Blackout pistol., and for that, I reached out to Brownells for a Holosun HS503C 2 MOA Circle Red Dot Sight. I was particularly interested in this sight because of it’s auto-brightness, solar cell recharging capability and ridiculously long battery life.

And so far, 3 months into it, I am very impressed with this sight. The sight illumination is always pretty much spot-on, although it does have some issues when I’m in a darker spot and pointing out to a much brighter sport. The reticle itself is clear and sharp, with a 2 MOA center that’s surrounded by a 65 MOA circle. I found that the circle fit neatly inside the torso of a standard USPSA target at 40 yards, making  rapid shots on close targets a breeze, and the 2 MOA dot was a nice, round circle, which, because of my astigmatism, doesn’t happen all that often for me.

I can’t speak to the ruggedness of the sight, as I’ve really not torture-tested it in anyway, but I did run into a spot of trouble when it came time to slide in a battery for the first time (and by “spot of trouble” I mean “I actually had to read the directions to see how things were supposed to work”). The battery itself, after three months of being left constantly on, is still going strong, where by this time, the battery in my Bushnell TRS-25 would have been a useless lump of metal.

I likey.

Bottom line is, if you’re looking for a 1x red dot for defensive or competition purposes, I think you’d be hard-pressed to find a better combination of features and pricing than this little sucker, and it’ll be my first-choice for such things from here on out.


FCC Notice: Brownells gave me this to review, not Holosun. Did I write a glowing review of it because of their generosity? Heck no, I wrote good things about it because it’s a good optic!
Duh.

Attention, Practical Shooting Organizations.

Attention, Practical Shooting Organizations.

USPSA, IDPA, 3 Gun Nation, Rimfire Challenge, the whole lot of you.

Now is your chance.

The NFL is self-immolating itself, and the NBA and Major League Baseball are right behind them. They’ve decided that 50% of the country shouldn’t be watching them play sports, so all of you have a great opportunity to step into the void.

How many of your top-level competitors are former military? How many are current law enforcement?

What are the odds that people who are ticked off by the shenanigans of the NFL would look up to the patriotism of such people?

Is there is a chance that 50% of the country might like to watch a sport where athletes are really and truly role models?

Get to work. You have until the NFL pre-season starts next year to make some hay off of this.

And if you need a hand getting it done, my email address is over there —>.

Team Colors

Team Colors

Thinking a little more about this post from awhile ago, why are sponsored shooter jerseys so devoid of branding? Sig did a decent job with their team, but other than that, you have the blue and black S&W jerseys which look totally different than the blue and black Taran Tactical jerseys which look nothing like the blue and black Mossberg jerseys…

You get the point.

Part of the reason is that there are very few shooters sponsored by just one company: Rob Leatham shoots for Springfield and Julie Golob for S&W, yet they are both part of Team Safariland.

No, I don’t get that either.

Maybe manufacturers would get better results from their sponsorship efforts into better, more eye-catching jerseys, rather than getting lost in see of look-alike templates.

Let Your Run Be Run And Your Gun Be Gun.

Let Your Run Be Run And Your Gun Be Gun.

This looks like fun. Exhausting, to be sure, but fun nevertheless.

Dropzone Gunner (DZG) is a once-in-a-lifetime event meant to combine extreme physical conditions along with the ability to operate a variety of weapons. Run, hurdle, jump, shoot. This is a “battlefield pickup” scenario event. All weapons will be staged and ready for you. Yes, we realize you may have a favorite rifle that is worth $10k with $23k worth of extras on it that you would prefer to use. This is not that type of event. You use whatever is in front of you. The art of surprise along with the ability to troubleshoot and manage whatever you come across is vital in this event.

A few things of interest here…

  1. The guns are all staged guns, and they’re all Kel-Tecs. Now we can have the discussion about Kel-Tec quality at another time, but this is a big deal. All guns from one manufacturer? When has that happened before?
  2. I really like the format. Way to appeal The Spartan Race crowd, people!
  3. The prize table is supposedly very, very good, with guns galore and (wait for it) cash as well. FN and SIG may have shut down their teams, but lawd almighty, this looks like a heck of a match.

 

It’s All In Your Head, Kid.

It’s All In Your Head, Kid.

I was chatting recently with a friend of mine about one of our favorite topics, the lack of sponsorship for competitive shooters outside of the gun world. Somehow, during our conversation, the needle in my brain skipped a few grooves, and I was reminded of my years playing role-playing games, usually with the people who designed the games we were playing.

I had some great times playing D&D and other games, and met some good people, but what I couldn’t do (and still can’t, to this day) is relate what happened in those games to anyone who wasn’t there. Playing a role-playing game is so intensely inwardly-focused, it just doesn’t translate to the outside world.

There are a LOT of people, like Larry Corriea, Jon Favreau, Vin Diesel and others who have harnessed the imagination and story-telling skill of an RPG and turned it into a profitable gig for themselves, but no one, ever, has made a ton of cash by talking about the adventures that went on inside a role-playing game.

Now pick that up and drop it on competitive shooting. Inwardly-focused? Check. Small group of aficionados who seem to speak their own cryptic language? Check. Usable in the real world only through interpretation? Check.

Today, a lot of people are making INSANE amounts of money in gaming, but it’s in video games, not role-playing games. There’s something to be learned here for the practical shooting community, but I haven’t gotten a clear grasp of what it is yet.

Yet.