Product Review: ASG P07 Duty Airsoft Pistol

Product Review: ASG P07 Duty Airsoft Pistol

I bought this (fake) gun for two reasons: I wanted to practice my draw from concealment at home, and I want to start some realistic force on force close quarters instruction with the good people at Generations Firearm Training

What was in the box?

The ASG P07 Duty is a licence-built copy of my daily carry gun, CZ’s P07 Duty, and right out the box, it felt like my P07, and it even comes with the P07’s crappy sights. The CZ P07 Duty has CZ’s “Omega Trigger” system that allows the user to quickly swap out parts and change the gun from a conventional SA/DA action with safety to an SA/DA with decocker, but the ASG P07 Duty did not have that option and came equipped with a safety only. I prefer to shoot the P07 decocked for two reasons, the first being I don’t like safeties on self-defense pistols. Yes, I know God and/or John Moses Browning designed the 1911 that way, so durn it, that’s the way it’s supposed to be, but to me, sweeping the safety off is one more thing to worry about in a situation where a fast reaction can save my life. I much prefer decocked double action, DAO or “safe action” pistols for defending my life. The other reason is less critical: IDPA SSP division mandates the first shot on any given course of fire must be shot double action, and rather than mix it up with the high-zoot guns in ESP, I can decock the P07 Duty and go for it. 

Side by side

The ASG P07 Duty is a CO2 powered blowback action pistol. The CO2 cartridge that powers the pistol fits rather cleverly into the butt: The lanyard loop at the bottom of the gun is pressed in, and the whole backstrap pops off, allowing for easy insertion of the cartridge into the gun.

Power to the pistol

Design-wise, it’s darn close to my CZ P07 Duty. The airsoft version is made from a darker plastic and the slide is much lighter than the real P07, but the heft and feel of the gun are about the same. The trigger on the airsoft gun is horrid, though, mushy and stacking with no real break or reset and is about 6-8 pounds single action. 

The magazine for the airsoft P07 holds about 21 BB’s and drops free when the mag release is pressed, just like the CZ P07. The biggest difference between the two guns is the airsoft P07 has a slightly larger magazine more like a CZ SP-01, but this doesn’t interfere with the operation of the gun.

Sight picture

Shooting the gun in the backyard, I found it tended to shoot high, but that was something that happened with the old sights on my CZ P07 Duty (remember the word “crappy” way back in the beginning of this review?), hence the CZ-USA  night sights on my 9mm P07 Duty in the photo above. The ASG P07 fits the Crossbreed Supertuck I use for daily carry perfectly, and that’ll come in real handy as I ramp up practice for IDPA. I was lucky enough to win $100 worth of BAM airsoft targets at the Rio Desert Classic a few years ago, and they’re great fun to bang and clang. along with a bunch of 1/3 size paper targets that I printed out and stuck into the ground with real-estate sign holders. Practiing with an airsoft gun, you have to realize it’ll do squat for follow up shots or anything that requires multiple hits per target, but it’s great for draw, sight picture and transitions. 

To sum up, the state of the art in airsoft guns is clearly changing. They’re not toys anymore, they’re tools, and should be thoughtfully considered by anyone looking to improve their competition or self-defence shooting habits at home and at a very low cost.

Still Useful

Still useful

I use the El Presidente drill as a benchmark for my pistol skills because it combines movement, drawing, target acquistion, transitions, accuracy, speed and reloads all in one neat little package.

And Dave Morelli agrees.

El Pres is about drawing and presenting the pistol, firing double taps at multiple targets and performing a speed reload. These are very important things to master in handling a gun for defensive purposes.

It is like a kata that has put together several functions in one drill. The karate man doesn’t expect to get attacked in the same order that he mastered his moves, but learns a kata to help him learn and master each move.

The mind can employ the moves as needed to the situation but first you have to master the moves. The same with the El Presidente.

Drills are kata. USPSA is sparring. Neither is the real thing.

Get Out Of Dodge

Get out of Dodge

Gabe Suarez sure has a chest-thumping, meat-eating manly-man way of taking on an aggressive mob

“If you have a pistol, please make sure it is a modern high capacity weapon with a couple of spare magazines in your belt. The Suarez International company gun, a Glock 17 with three magazines, yields a sum total of 52 rounds. Figure three rounds per man, and you can reduce an angry mob of panga swinging killers into a fleeing group of bloodied bad guys. Draw it and yell, “Get The F*** Back!” If they do, run away. If they do not, shoot the first man in the face. The rest will take care of itself.” 

Umn, err, “The rest will take care of itself” isn’t exactly a plan, is it? 

I carry a spare magazine for my CCW gun, but not because I expect the zombie hoards to pop up in my local Circle K or because I expect a hockey riot to break out in my local mall. Rather, I carry a spare mag because 90% of all problems with a semi-auto come down to feeding rounds into the chamber, and having another mag to go to in case something burps gives me a little more confidence in what I carry. 

And as for what to do when a mob shows up, I prefer to learn from people who went through the worst of the 1992 L.A. riots

Don’t Mess With My Wife

Don’t mess with my wife

Mission accomplished

That's gonna leave a mark.

That’s her results with my CZ75 and P07 from 15-25 feet. And it gets better with the S&W K-22 revolver her Dad gave to us when he passed away. 

pop pop pop

I’ll leave any more training she might need to the experts

A few observations from this outing… 

  1. I wasn’t the only one. In the lane next to us was a young man teaching his girlfriend to shoot and there was another couple a few lanes over as well (and my wife out-shot ’em both 😀 ). 
  2. An hour or two of dry-fire practice beforehand REALLY paid off on the range. 
  3. .22 revolvers ROCK as a gun for first-time shooters. My wife learned a smooth, sustained trigger pull by starting out with the K-22 and the recoil and noise was non-existent. 

What’s the secret for teaching your spouse to shoot? Patience, encouragement, reasonable expectations and a willingness to do something they like (but you don’t) in return.

I’ve been wanting to get her out to the range for months now, and I think I was able to do this outing because I started showing interest in her activities, so she started showing interest in mine. I wasn’t expecting my wife to turn into Debbie Keehart overnight, but I did want her to know how to safely operate the gun(s) we have for home defence, and in return, I’m going to the new Harry Potter movie with her next month. If and when we go shooting again, I’d like her to try out some rental guns: She had issues hitting the mag release button and slide lock lever on both my CZ’s, some maybe there’s something out there more suited to her hands. The big takeaway from today was her safety habits were/are first-rate, and that makes a trainer ‘s job so much easier.

General Knowledge

General knowledge

“A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.” 

– Robert A. Heinlein 

Robb’s post about what guns he wants and my post about the beginning armory got me a-thinkin’. What tasks should a garden-variety gun nut firearms enthusiast be capable of accomplishing? I’m not talking about winning Top Shot, I’m talking about being a well-rounded shooter. What should you know, what should you know how to do?

My suggestions: 

A firearms enthusiast should be able to… 

Know the basic operation and use of:
A muzzle-loading black powder rifle
A single action revolver
A double action revolver
A magazine-fed single/double action semiautomatic pistol
A magazine-fed striker-fired semiautomatic pistol
A magazine-fed semiautomatic rifle
A bolt-action rifle
A tube-fed lever-action rifle or shotgun
A tube-fed pump-action shotgun or rifle
A tube-fed semiautomatic shotgun
An over/under or side by side shotgun 

Be capable of:
– Field-stripping and cleaning any firearm they own
– Know the basic operation for any firearm they own
– Diagnose common issues with ammunition or operation that might prevent any gun they own from working properly and be able to deal with them correctly

Know how to (but not always accomplish):
– Draw a pistol smoothly and quickly from a holster (maybe from concealment, maybe not) 
– Hit center-mass of a man-sized target at least 7 yards away
– Hit a clay pigeon in-flight 
– Hit a man-sized target with a modern rifle 300 yards away 

Know (and ALWAYS accomplish successfully)
The Four Rules of Gun Safety 

What tasks or skills did I leave out? What should I remove?

Self Defense Insurance Comparison

Self Defense Insurance Comparison

Update: I have a newer, more comprehensive comparison over here. And hey, if you’re new to the site, feel free to stick around and/or give me a Like on Facebook.

There’s now three self-defense insurance plans out there for CCW carriers (and others) who want to win the court battle that comes after the gun battle. We spend hours on the range and thousands of dollars on guns, ammo, gear and training to prepare to defend our lives, but don’t spend a nickel on preparing to defend ourselves in court. Once my current bout of funemployment is over, I will be taking advantage of one of these offers, and it’s something I’d recommend for every civilian who carries a firearm.

Armed Citizen Legal Defense Fund

The purpose of the Network’s Legal Defense Fund is to provide legal defense support to Network members, when these lawfully armed citizens face prosecution or civil lawsuit after exercising their right to self defense. The Network does not offer an insurance program or a prepaid legal fee service, but rather a number of benefits are made available to members. If a member is involved in a self defense incident, a fee deposit is paid to the member’s attorney by the Network to get the legal defense immediately underway, with representation during questioning, and arranging for an independent investigation of the incident. If the incident results in felony charges the fee deposit is $10,000; if the member faces misdemeanor charges, a $5,000 fee deposit is sent to his or her attorney.

Network members, by virtue of their membership, are entitled to case review by one of the Network experts and have access to contact information for Network-affiliated attorneys and expert witnesses. For this service, there is no charge beyond the Network membership fee. Beyond that, distribution of monetary grants to help with legal fees is at the discretion of the Network’s Advisory Board, comprised of Massad Ayoob, John Farnam, Jim Fleming, Tom Givens, Dennis Tueller and Network officers, Marty Hayes and Vincent Shuck, as ex officio members.

NRA Self-Defense Insurance

Update: NRA Self-Defense Insurance is now provided through NRA Carry Guard.

Our Self-Defense Insurance protects National Rifle Association members who need extra protection not found in most homeowners’ policies.

The coverage is a rider to the Excess Personal Liability coverage, and provides civil defense and liability and criminal defense reimbursement if you are involved in an act of self-defense.

What’s Covered:

• Provides coverage up to the limit selected for criminal and civil defense costs.
• Cost of civil suit defense is provided in addition to the limit of liability for bodily injury and property damage.
• Criminal Defense Reimbursement is provided for alleged criminal actions involving self-defense when you are acquitted of such criminal charges or the charges are dropped.

US Concealed Carry Association Legal Defense Foundation

The Self-Defense SHIELD consists of an insurance policy owned by the USCCA that designates the members as beneficiaries. No individual ungerwriting is required. As a Silver PLUS, Gold PLUS or Platinum PLUS member you automatically receve these insurance benfits. The USCCA owns and pays for the policy while you get the benefits.

Criminal Defense Grant
This layer of the Self-Defense SHIELD can help you pay for your criminal defense lawyer if you’re charged with a crime.

Court-Related Expenses
Our final layer of the USCCA Self-Defense SHIELD allows active members to apply for an additional grant for any other court-related expenses.

Policy Comparison


Criminal Court Costs Civil Court Costs Expert Witneseses Addt’l Grants Cost /Year
USCCA Silver $25,000.00 $50,000.00 Y $25,000.00 $127.00
USCCA Gold $50,000.00 $100,000.00 Y $50,000.00 $197.00
USCCA Platinum $75,000.00 $300,000.00 Y $75,000.00 $297.00
NRA Self-Defense Insurance One * $50,000.00 * $100,000.00 * N N $165.00
NRA Self-Defense Insurance Two * $50,000.00 * $250,000.00 * N N $254.00
Armed Citizen Legal Defense Fund $5000/$10,000 Y ** Y Y *** $85.00

* Total coverage is split between civil and criminal cases, with a $50,000.00 sub-limit on criminal court cases

** From the comments: “In your comparison grid you incorrectly state that the Network extends no assistance forcivil court costs. That is not correct. While The Network is not an insurance scheme, and thus does not have coverage limits, our commitment to our members who have had to defend themselves against criminal attack is to assist in their legal defense — be that a criminal trial or civil litigation — to the extent that our advisory board deems appropriate.”
The post has been updated to reflect this new information

Also from the comments: “The NRA-endorsed insurance programs require that you be an NRA membership. Average price is about $25 per year. The ACLDN membership requires no other membership costs. The USCCA Self-Defense SHIELD memberships at the Plus levels also include membership in the USCCA at the listed level which costs $37, $67, or $97 for Silver, Gold, and Platinum respectively.

In addition, the spreadsheet only marks the NRA coverages as having the criminal limit being included in the civil limits. The SHIELD program does the same thing. The listed limits are per occurrence, including all coverage – civil and criminal. The criminal limits are the portion of the total which may be used for criminal defense.”

The table also misstates the USCCA coverage for expert witnesses. The summary of benefits states the coverage includes “reasonable and necessary costs and expenses incurred in connection with the investigation and/or defense of any criminal charge or criminal proceeding caused by the use of a firearm”. After checking with the insurance company, Tim Schmidt confirms that this is the correct interpretation. The USCCA Self-Defense SHIELD program does indeed include coverage for expert witness testimony, private investigators, laboratories, and any other related expenses that would be needed to prepare and present the necessary defense.”

*** Grant amounts are unspecified

All descriptions of the policies were taken verbatim from each organization’s website.

 

Ninth Report

Ninth Report

I did it.

No, not classify as C Class yet (that will have to wait for next month), but rather, I finally shot a perfect Dot Torture Drill.

Dot Torture Drill: 50/50

TA DA!

If a shot touches the line on an USPSA or IDPA target, it counts, and that’s what I’m going with here unless someone tells me differently. And look at the difference a year of semi-regular practice makes!

First take

Now that I’m shot it clean, it’s time to shoot it clean again. And then again. And then move the target out to 5 yards, lather, rinse, repeat. And the hits just keep a-comin’…

El Presidenté 

Gun: CZ 75 1st Run 2nd Run 3rd Run
Target One 2A 2C 3A C A 2C D
Target Two A 3C A 3C A 3C
Target Three 3A D 3A D 3A C

Time 8.04 7.30 10.54
A’s 6 8 5
B’s
C’s 5 3 6
D’s 1 1 1
M’s
Points 46 50 44
Score 5.72 6.85 4.17
Draw 1.81 1.72 2.01
Reload 2.43 2.15 2.89
Avg. Split 0.38 0.34 0.48

Yep, my all-time best score, fastest draw and fastest average split on the El Presidenté.

What made the difference between my quasi-sucky last outing and this outing? Two things:

  1. Practicing with a .22 every week. Well, at least until my .22 broke, that is. I knew that target transitions, weak hand only and strong hand only shooting were issues, so I practiced shooting those at Caswell’s during the week.
  2. Dry fire. I’d been neglecting dry-fire practice over the past few months, so I made it a point to get in at least 15 minutes of dry fire each night, and it made a difference.

Now, on to C Class!

Eighth Report

Eighth Report

This is what happens when you spend a lot of time on improving your two-handed grip: Your strong hand and weak hand only grip goes pear-shaped. 

Dot Torture Drill: 41 out of 50.

051011

Pa-The-Tic. 

Sorta. The shots I took two-handed were natural, smooth and (most importantly) on-target. It’s the one-handed stuff I need to work on, that’s ok. The worst practice sessions are the ones where I don’t learn anything, and while I’ve yet to shoot this drill clean, it is helping me shoot better, which, after all, is the point of doing it.


CZ75 1 CZ75 2 CZ75 3
Target One 2A C D 3A D 4A
Target Two 2A C D 2A 2C 3A C
Target Three 3A C 3A D 4A

Time 8.94 8.41 10.54
A’s 7 8 11
B’s
C’s 3 2 1
D’s 2 2
M’s
Points 46 48 58
Score 5.15 5.71 5.5
Draw 1.98 2.1 2.28
Reload 2.79 2.68 2.79
Avg. Split 0.42 0.37 0.55

And a new high point total on the El Prez!

I don’t care if I bomb every Dot-Torture from now on as long as I keep improving on the El Prez. I use the Dot Torture drill as diagnosis, I use the El Prez as my yardstick.

What did I learn today? I need to keep working on one hand only drills, so that will be the focus of my dry-fire practice over the next few days. Oh, and shooting stuff is still fun, even for the unemployed.

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