Musical Interlude.

Jello Biafra. A man ahead of his time. Everything he’s singing about here has come true in the past few years. And don’t get me started on “Holiday In Cambodia.”

All In One Training For Civilians Is FINALLY Here.

Me, a few years ago

We can go to a dojo and learn empty hand techniques. We can go to a firearms trainer and learn to shoot. We can spar in competition to learn what works on the mat, and we can shoot IPSC and IDPA to learn what works on the square range.

Where do we civilians go to learn all of those at once, and get in the practice (kata, if you will) that allows integrated techniques to become second nature to us?

Mike Seeklander, this month.

Warrior One is a collaboration with Jake Saenz and Atomic Athlete and the first of its kind.

This program contains structured training not only for fitness but for defensive handgun skills as well.

And it teaches basic strikes and empty-hand techniques as well.

I’m interested. I’m very, very interested.

I’ll Come To Your Emotional Rescue.

Ron Avery has some interesting thoughts on bringing the reality of the gunfight into our training and practice.

Practice with the emotional intensity of a real encounter. You are FIGHTING, not just shooting. Psychological toughness/dominance is a mindset that must be exercised in order to develop it. As part of your training, visualize what you are doing as an actual encounter. Mindset is everything and it starts before you get to the range. Paul Carlson also expressed similar thoughts on a recent episode of The Gunfighter podcast, and that got me thinking about the dog that is not barking inside the training community, namely, creating the emotions we’ll need to win a deadly force encounter.

To be honest, prepping for the emotional portion of a deadly force encounter has not entered my mind in the least. Maybe it’s because there is a fine, fine line between the sense of urgency brought on by an emotional response and the physical and mental shutdown brought on by panic and fear.

The thing is, thought, that my reasons for pursing armed self-defense are pretty much 100% emotional: I don’t want to die, and I don’t want my loved ones to die either.

Emotions, when used properly, can he a powerful, powerful tool. This was brought home to me a few years ago when I trained with Gabe Suarez. He was trying to show us his techniques for shooting and moving, and I, like the good gamer I was, preferred to shoot it in an IDPA duck-walk rather than the flat-out run he wanted. I wasn’t able to muster the speed needed because I didn’t understand the need for speed in that situation.

Then Gabe pointed the frame of his Glock (not the gun, just the frame) at my face, and the reason for speeding up became much, much clearer.

Training with Gabe Suarez

As I said on-camera, having that inert hunk of plastic pointed at me put things in a whole new light. All of a sudden, I went from trying to solve the intellectual problem of absorbing what I was being taught and the physical challenge of doing the required tasks to dealing with the emotions associated with having someone trying to kill me and using thouse emotions to enhance my abliities, rather than detract from my performance.

It’s interesting that with just over 300 hours of formal training under my belt, that has been the one and only time (so far) that an instructor has brought in an element of preparing for the emotional stress of a gunfight, and I think the training community as a whole is missing out on something here. Yes, learning the physical skills needed to survive is important, as is having the intellectual firepower needed to solve problems quickly under stress, but let’s not forget that all of that starts with the will to win, thrive and survive all that might be thrown at us, and that starts with having the emotional fortitude to carry us through to victory.

Get Home Safely Without Emptying Your Wallet

The Armed Lutheran put together a great little “Get-Home” bag for under $50 that has almost all the essentials, but there are a few things I’d add on that would really round it out.

  • Glow sticks (a cheap light source that lasts a long time and doesn’t use batteries)
  • Rain ponchos (Save wear and tear on your emergency blankets)
  • Trash bags (Emergency rain gear, trash duty and for carrying stuff)
  • A lighter and/or matches (because you never know when you might need fire)
  • A mirror and whistle for signaling if you get lost
  • A road map, because cell signal strength can vary on a whim
  • A small trauma kit, but first aid is first aid, and trauma is trauma

All this stuff does double the cost of the bag, but it also greatly increases your comfort and options during a period where you might have to go it alone for over a day. And if you don’t feel like going to all this trouble, there’s always the Echo Sigma Runner 24 Kit that does much the same thing, but it’s already made up for you, ready to roll.

I Got Rhythm, I Got Music.

But new content? Nope, don’t got that.

I accidentally published today’s post on Thursday night, so now you have to suffer.

To ease your pain, though, here’s Gene Kelly from “An American In Paris.”

I’ve said it before and I’ll say again: Women want their men to dance smoothly and elegantly like Fred Astaire, but men want to dance like Gene Kelly.

Commit Yourself To Marksmanship

I’ve got some ideas on helping new gun owners do more than just place their guns in a place of veneration in their home, hoping it will act as a talisman of self-protection over at Ricochet.com.

Thinking more about this, I’ve seen meme after meme pop up on the internet about dumb gun owners, and heck, I’ve chimed in with a few myself, from time to time.

But is this the path to a safer, more-educated firearms community? Making fun of people is easy, making better people is hard.

And the hard choice is usually the right one.

Thin Is In.

“Absorb what is useful, discard what is useless and add what is specifically your own.”

– Bruce Lee

For quite some time now , I’ve been trying to come up with a way to carry around a trauma kit on my person with the same ease and assurance that I’ve carried around a pistol.

And it’s not been easy. First, I tried to try to find a way to carry around this “Pocket” Trauma kit, and I wound up filleting that kit even further to fit it inside a mobile phone case in a quest for an even-smaller kit.

But even that wasn’t small enough because the case clearly showed up under my shirt. Sure, it wound up looking like the iPhone case it really was, but when it comes to how much we show the world about what we’re carrying, I agree with Lucas Apps and I also agree with Greg Ellifritz. I agree with Lucas in that 99% of the people who might even notice a bulge under our shirts will dismiss it as a cell phone or something innocuous, but the problem is, as Greg says, the 1% who think it’s a gun will either a) not care or b) care quite a lot because they are up to no good.

Seeing as how that last one half of one percent is one of the reasons why I carry a gun in the first place, the trick is coming up with trauma care solution that will work well in an emergency situation yet doesn’t leave me looking I’ve got Batman’s utility belt hidden under my t-shirt.

Which bring me to this video by Paul Gomez and the humble triangular bandage. It works, and it takes up pretty much zero space. I can stuff a bandage and two small packs of Celox into a coin purse, slide it into one of my rear pants pockets and a bandanna into the other one, and if anyone notices anything, it looks like I’m carrying a bandanna and a wallet in my pockets, because, well, I am.

What’s the first rule of hiding something in plain sight? Help people see what they’re expecting to see, even if it’s not really there.

Assorted trauma gear

That’s my old iPhone trauma kit on the left, but this photo doesn’t do justice to how portable and concealable the new kit really is. The bandanna is there because bandannas are massively useful: They can be used as a compress, to stuff wounds, to wipe the sweat off your brow or as a hankie, as needed. The bandages, Celox and two small safety pins are in the coin purse to keep them in one spot and to help protect them from being sat upon for hours on end. That feeling of constantly sitting on something took some getting used to, as I haven’t carried a wallet in my back pocket for twenty years. Fortunately, I got used to it pretty quickly, because this solution is THIN.

How thin you ask? This thin.

Thin, concealable tourniquets

That’s my iPhone-based trauma kit on the left, which is still less thin than a double-stack pistol magazine, yet a bit too big and bulky for true concealment under a t-shirt (at least for me).

We know, from trial and (much) error that thinner guns are easier to carry and conceal, and yet we still insist that the only correct solution for civilian trauma care is a military-approved tourniquet or (worse yet) an IFAK. No, it is not an optimal solution, but it is a solution I can carry around pretty much every day. Think of it as the trauma care equivalent of a pocket .380, and you’ll understand my reasoning here.

IFAKs are great and they save lives, but they are a military solution to a civilian problem. The live-saving technology that started out in the military is starting to trickle down to those of us who don’t carry an M4 for a living, and that’s a good thing. However, just because I don’t walk around with an M4 and a chest rig doesn’t mean there’s not a need for a trauma care solution that works for the civilian market but incorporates the hard-won lessons from the military. We are just beginning to figure out civilian-centric solutions to trauma care, and I’m excited to see what’s coming down the road. For now, though, I think I’ve finally figured out what works for me on a day-in, day out basis.

Current Casual EDC

A quick update now that I’m carrying around a smaller trauma kit.

sheild_edc

Clockwise from upper left:

And I normally carry an SOG Mini Instinct as well, along the centerline of my body. All of this easily conceals in a normal pair of jeans underneath an untucked t-shirt, and I’ve carried in on 3+ mile walks as well. I’m pretty happy with what I’ve got now, and barring any changes like a new laser, this should be my “go to” for days when I don’t have to play dress-up in the office.

Update: Rats, hit “Publish” instead of “Save”. Oh well, you’ll find out more about the trauma kit tomorrow.

Lawfully Armed Citizen Arrives On-Scene of Officer In Distress. What’s Expected To Happen Next, Happens.

Yep, the (legally) armed citizen saved the officer’s life. Again.

(Arizona Department of Public Safety) says the trooper was “ambushed” by a suspect who came from an unknown direction. The suspect shot the trooper at least once in the chest-shoulder area and fought the trooper to the ground.

A passerby stopped to render aid and the trooper asked for help. Officials say the driver went back to his car, grabbed a gun and shot at the suspect who was not following his commands to stop attacking the trooper. The suspect was killed.

Good shooting, Mr. Passerby. Next time, though, carry on your person when you’re in your car. It’s faster. And I hope you also never have to pay for a beer again for the rest of your life.

And, in the interests of fairness and equal time, I will now make a detailed, comprehensive list of all the times that a civilian member of the Coalition To Stop Gun Violence, the Brady Campaign and/or a supporter of Black Lives Matter has stopped an in-progress assault on a police officer.

There. Don’t ever say I’m not fair and balanced when it comes to the effectiveness of an armed vs. disarmed citizenry.

Pocket Change.

I’ve got a new article on the advantages and disadvantages of pocket pistols over at Lucky Gunner.

Go check it out. And I even managed to sneak in a musical reference in the title…