Ruger LCPII 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 1039 – 1140

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge

I took the LCP][ with me to this week’s Shoot N Scoot range day at Louland Gun Range, to put another 100 rounds of Lucky Gunner’s .380ACP ammo through it. Jeff and Robyn attract a lot of new shooters to this class because it’s a low-key introduction into the world of competition that gets people used to walking around with the weight of a gun on their hip.

Plus it’s a lot of fun.

The stages are really lightweight, usually comprised of 4-5 shooting boxes and 4-6 rounds per presentation, with no memory stages and pretty much 100% steel targets. It makes for a good intro the sport, which is why I shot it with my LCP][.

The biggest issue I found was reloading, as six round mags on the LCP][ meant that I was constantly feeding in fresh mags, and I also ran into some issues with the low-power .380 rounds not having the oomph needed to drop the poppers. This wasn’t an issue, though, as this is a training event and is not for score.

All in all, another successful outing with this little Ruger. My confidence with it as a carry gun grows each time I shoot it, and I’m continually impressed with how easy it is to shoot.

Rounds Fired: 100 Rounds Winchester White Box .380 ACP

2000 Round Challenge Results
Total Rounds Fired: 1139
One possible failure to eject on round 116
Failures to eject: Rounds 400, 489, 974, 993
Failure to feed: Round 873

Range Stuff, Life Stuff, Other Stuff.

Gabe Suarez has a great article on the realities of shotgun reloading in defensive situations. If you need to reload a shotgun in the midst of a defensive encounter, that means the 5+1 or whatever rounds you had in it were not up to the task at hand, and if 6 or more #00 buck or slugs ain’t solving your problems, buddy, you have problems indeed.

Which got me thinking about skills that are essential on the range in a training class, and skills that are essential outside the training bay.

Loading a shotgun quickly is one of those training bay skills, and it’s even more essential in 3 Gun. There is gadget after gadget out there designed to help you reload your scattergun in mere seconds during a match, but those gadgets are of limited utility outside of a 3 Gun stage.

Speaking of reloading, Karl Rehn has a terrific breakdown of what is actually faster; reloading a pistol with the muzzle pointed up vs. level vs. pointed down, which is great for proving which method is faster and safest in a training bay or at a shooting match.

However, given that John Correia has watched and analyzed over 10,000 gunfights on video and not one armed citizen has ever needed to reload his gun during the fight, is a fast pistol reload necessary for the training bay, or for outside the range?

Final, semi-heritical note: Reloads are an essential part of a number of pistol drills, including the beloved El Presidente and the F.A.S.T.

If we know that reloading the pistol is a skill that we probably won’t need to use under pressure, even if we get into 10,000 gunfights, should it really be a part of those drills?

I don’t know, but I’m interested in finding out.

This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things.

I like the article I wrote for Ricochet on choosing a firearms trainer, but the picture used to accompany the article is not the most… clueful of shots.

The nuances of what makes a good concealed carry rig can be hard to determine, and what’s worse, that was actually one of the better images that my editor had to choose from on Shutterstock.com, as I will now demonstrate.

The Thing Itself.

I subscribed much more firmly to Aristotelean realism than to Platonic idealism. I’m not too concerned about the implications and ramifications of what might exist, rather, I am more focused on the thing itself.

Which is why this piece interested me.

What emotions do you attach to firearms?  Your emotions help determine what an object means to you.

I don’t, for the most part, attach any emotion to a firearm. There are a few exceptions, of course, like the .22 revolver my father-in-law carried or the CZ75 that kicked off my journey into armed self-defense, but I don’t attach feelings to all of the other guns I own. They serve a purpose, and if they didn’t, I’d get rid of them.

There are others who feel different, and that’s fine. There’s a lot of different ways to be human, and as long as we play nice with each other, everything is cool. I’ve just never associated emotions with objects. My self defense guns are an extension of my desire to keep my family safe, and I attach my emotions to my family, not to what keeps them safe. It’s always been about the why, not the how with me.

An Army Of We.

Interesting article on Wired on how social media is proving to be more flexible and faster-responding to disasters than the .gov is.

From Hernandez’s viewpoint, international aid workers from countries such as Spain, Japan, Israel, and the United States were working at a dangerously slow pace. Hernández placed more trust in civilians, such as the carpenters, electricians, and welders who had responded to volunteers’ messages. The lamps, shovels, and dust masks were distributed from volunteers’ tents. The food that volunteers provided for the hundreds of people on site, including the government’s uniformed forces, was prepared in their own homes.

The Southern Baptists figured this out YEARS ago, which is why they’re so much better at responding to hurricanes than anyone else.

The modern security state exists, in part, because the people decided they needed a larger-scale response to large-scale traumatic events than they as individuals were able to provide. When a really big fire and a rising crime rate was the problem, the people got together and appointed members of their community to act as firefighters and police officers and solve those problems.

What happens when the people themselves can self-organize faster than the agencies that were supposed to solve those problems? What happens when the people who were supposed to solve the problems become the problem itself?

As the saying goes, the internet treats censorship as damage and routes around it. Maybe now we’re seeing what happens when the internet has to route traffic to damage in order to repair it.

They Just Work.

Reading the comments to yesterday’s post has been interesting. When I wrote it, I wasn’t thinking of specific hardware solutions, I was thinking about how you relate to the hardware itself.

The original Macintosh was truly “The computer for the rest of us”. It was the first personal computer you could use without having to become a personal computer hobbyist to one extent or another. Yes, people used PC’s to one extent or another before the Mac came out (and I was one of them), but the echoes of previous computer designs made them somewhat less than user-friendly right out of the box.

For example, I made pin money right out of high school setting up autoexec.bat files that allowed the user to launch WordStar or Visicalc or DBIII with one keystroke on startup inside MS-DOS. This was necessary because getting those programs to run (and making your computer DO something) was confusing for anyone who wasn’t willing to put in the time and effort to learn DOS. People were forced to make themselves work the way the computer worked.

That was guns before Glock. Want a 1911? Sure thing. You bought it, and then sent it to your gunsmith so it could run reliably. You needed to know what was under the hood of your pistol or how to run a DA/SA trigger or how to live with the 6 shots in a revolver. There were limitations placed on you by your pistol before you could use it as an effective self-defence tool.

Glock changed that. They just worked.

Glocks Are Macs.

This nice little piece over at Ricochet got my thinking about why I am a such an Apple nerd.

They just work. The Mac was the first computer to not get in your way while you operated the computer.

This is the point where all the Windows nerds chime in and say, “No, thats not true! Windows is just as easy to use!” and yes, right now, it is.

But that was NOT true of Windows until version 3.1.1 came out. In the mean time, CMD-V on a Mac had been “Paste” for years and years, while over in IBM world, it was a different command to Paste on WordStar than it was in Word.

Macs didn’t (and don’t) get in your way.

Glocks are Macs. For the most part, you don’t need to worry about the WHAT of operating your gun, you can work on why you need to operating your gun and how it will affect those around you.

Glocks are Macs.

The thing that REALLY made a computer useful in the home wasn’t the operation system or the hardware, though. It was the 56.6k modem and AOL. We’re concentrating so much on the hardware, we forget what changes the world is how everything works together.

Say When.

It was interesting reading this bit from Greg Elifritz on choosing the right time to get violent, especially considering that he posted it almost two years before John Corriea talked about the same sort of thing over there. Both guys came to pretty much the same the conclusion, but using different methods.

It’s something I think we need to think about more. The cliché you see in an NRA Personal Protection Class (and elsewhere) is the bad gun (always a bad GUY) jumping out from behind a car with a knife and shouts out “GIMMEALLYOURMONEYRIGHTNOWORI’LLKILL!!”

But lets face it, we’re probably more likely to stumble into something already in progress or be caught on the fringe of something that goes down in front of us than to have the mugger-in-the-car-lot scenario happen to us, or we’ll be involved in a “monkey dance” situation with a stranger (or more likely, a family member or friend) that we just can’t de-escalate fast enough.

Then what?

Well, the five things that Andrew Branca talks about all better be in-place, or else you’re in a heap of trouble.