Nine In The Side Pocket

I didn’t grow up with the culture of the six-shooter, so I never understood the attraction to revolvers. Yes, in bygone eras when the reliability of semi-automatic was an iffy proposition, it may have made a lot of sense to carry a revolver instead of a semi-auto.

But we don’t live in bygone eras, we live in the world of today, and these days, single-stack 9mms have become the new snub-nosed revolver.

Presenting The Interactive Pistol Training System

Yep, this is what I’ve been working to bring to fruition these past few months, and quite frankly, there is nothing else like it on the market today.

This is what happens when someone (not me) with 30+ years in the tech world buys a gun and wants to get better at shooting, but then realizes that the products out there are all lacking in one way or another. The Interactive Pistol Training System, or iPTS, is the first all-in-one dry fire trainer.
Period, full stop.

Ok, so what is the iPTS?

First off, it’s electronic, and it uses sensor fusion technology to track everything. Sensor fusion is the same sort of stuff that’s in those driverless cars we’ve been hearing about: It’s a bunch of different detection systems all working together to provide data, not just a laser or not just an accelerometer… it’s everything. The target has sensors on it that work with the pistol to record hits, distance to target… you name it.

The iPTS 1700: Are you ready?

Think about it for a second… Every postal match, everywhere, relies on the shooters being honorable and not cheating about how close they place their target and how fast they’re shooting. The iPTS records all of the data, so there can be no cheating in the match… what you shoot is what you get. The app ties it all together, and we built in “must have” items like a timer and the ability to export your training sessions to email and the like

Oh, and if you think THAT is cool, check out what the Interactive Monitor Target can do. It’s stretch goal, but if it’s reached, I really think it can change how people train with their guns at home or in the classroom.

The pistol will use a BUNCH of accessories from a certain 9mm pistol made in Austria, and fit in the holsters for that gun as well.

And here’s one the many cool things about this system: You know how you turn the darn thing on? You slide in an (inert) mag, and rack the slide.

Makes sense, doesn’t it? And that’s what we’ve tried to do with all of this: Create a system that makes sense, and works with how you shoot. The purpose the iPTS from the very beginning wasn’t to create a system that put a dot on the wall, it was to create a system that would help people become safer and more accurate with a pistol.

We’ll be going live on Indiegogo on April 15th, but for now, check out the website and our “Coming Soon” page and sign up for news on when we launch.

 

I’m In.

Armed Parents

What should pop up in my social media feed right after I finished those last two rants but the news that Melody Lauer is bringing her Armed Parenting Class to Homestead Training Center in December of this year.

I’m in. I am SO in. I’ve been fascinated about this class from the moment I heard about it, for two reasons:

  1. The name of the course is *Contextual* Handgun. Think about that for a second… most (if not all) handgun training takes place in a context-free environment where we students are forced to adapt what we learn to our own lives. The instructor talks about presentation from a holster and post-engagement scan and assess and blah blah blah and then we students have to figure out what may or may not work for us.
    And let’s face it: If I was a single guy in the my late 20’s with no family, the threats that I might face and my reasons for defending myself or others would be quite different than they are now, with a wife and two young sons. If the reasons why were buying guns these days isn’t just “It’s a gun, and I can,” it makes sense to create training classes that are more than just “it’s a gun, here’s how you shoot it,” and yet nobody is doing that.
  2. People who I know and trust (and Bob Owens as well) have taken this course, and they’ve raved about it.

Really looking forward to this.

Door Kickers On The Home Front.

Thinking more about yesterday’s post, maybe the reasons behind some of the (in Tam’s wonderful words) “Battle of Fallujah cosplay” that’s going on now might be because of where our current wars are being fought. Unlike previous wars that were fought out in the boonies somewhere, vets from today’s wars are coming home with experience fighting on urban terrain, then they try to apply the knowledge that kept them alive in cities overseas to their lives over here, with varying results. There is a LOT we can learn spotting trouble before it happens from people who have done overwatch on a convoy for years and years, but on the other hand, if I have to do a “clear and hold” operation on a nearby neighborhood, that probably means a) I am living in the wrong freaking neighborhood and b) isn’t that the cop’s job, not mine?

That being said, why hasn’t the info on how the contractors and others working overseas doing personal security work spread far and wide amongst us civilians? I’ve been trying for YEARS to find a good entry-level “executive protection” class for schmoes like me, but to absolutely no avail. The bodyguard’s job is lot closer to my job (if you want to call it a job, because doing so treads dangerously close to SHEEPDOG! territory) as an armed civilian that the soldier’s role is. The role of a bodyguard is to make sure the people under his or her care make it through the day alive, and the tools that a bodyguard has to use (a good set of eyes, an alert mind, and maybe a pistol or something) is much closer to what I have on me right now than someone jogging down a dusty street in Mosul with his platoon might have with them.

I will take two paragraphs on pre-attack indicators and how to react to a quick punch to the head over ten pages on how to form up a stack and breach a door. Nothing against those who are running towards the sound of gunfire, I will always respect what they do, but what they do and what I do exist in two separate worlds.

How Far Is Too Far?

I was chatting last week with a friend of mine about AR optics (Yes, I do talk about them. No, they are not my primary focus*). The discussion was around the utility of the low-power, variable power scopes on a defensive rifle. After all, I reasoned, the 1-4x and 1-6x variable power scope rules the roost in 3 Gun, a sport that requires quick transitions from targets that are right in front of you to shots that are 300 yards and beyond.

Sounds like something that would be useful to combat, doesn’t it? So why is the conventional wisdom still get either a 1x red dot/holographic like an Aimpoint or EO Tech, or a fixed-power 4x like an ACOG for a “fighting gun”? Why? Because you should use what the cops and the military uses, not what gamers use, that ‘s what they say. I mean, yes, gamers have used red optics on pistols for decades but red dot optics don’t belong on a fighting pistol, right? RIGHT?

Or you know, not.

The conversation turned interesting, though, when the subject of making self-defense shots at distance came up. Yes, having an optic on your gun that helps you reach out and touch someone at 300 yards might be useful, but will it get you into legal trouble if you do so?

*thoughtful pause*

He has a point. As I learned earlier this year, one of the principles behind a successful use of “self defense” in a legal situation is imminence: Is the threat I’m facing one that is happening right now, or is it a threat for sometime in the future? I can’t shoot someone because they say they’re going to shoot me a week from Tuesday, but that situation changes if that person is ten yards away from me and clearing leather.

So what, then, is the actual useful range of your long gun?

I’d say it depends: If you’re unlucky enough to have the Leprechaun Liberation Army marching down your street, Molotov cocktails in hand and shouting about how it’s time for the little people to rise up and overthrow the humans, then yeah, 50 yards might be a little close for your safety. If they take it one step further and those pesky little buggers have rifles to go with their flaming bottles of gasoline and are pointing said rifles at the general populace, then it might get rather sporty in my neighborhood for a moment or two **.


* Focus. Optics. Get it? Get it?

** As always, remember that I am an okapi in the Bronx Zoo, not a lawyer. I can give you advice on feeding schedules and where to poop in your compound, but not on when it’s ok to shoot someone.

*Your Ad Here*

Mondrian Cycling TeamFirearms-related companies seem absolutely addicted to sponsoring practical shooters as a means of marketing themselves, and a big part of that, for some insane reason or another, is having the shooter where a jersey to a match with the sponsor’s name on it somewhere, in the hopes that other shooters will see the sponsor’s logo and buy the sponsor’s products.

But have you SEEN the shirts more shooters wear? Can you tell, at a glance, who gives the shooter the most amount of support? No? Then why are the spending the $$$ to sponsor a shooter? Taran Tactical and S&W do a good job of branding their shooters, as did the late, great FN USA and Sig Sauer shooting teams, but other than that, what is there? I’m not asking for something as distinctive as the Lotus 72 (aka the John Player Special and probably the prettiest car ever to race on any track, anywhere), but how can a sponsored shooter stand out from the crowd (and provide more value to his/her sponsors) if all they’re doing is taking the same shirt templates that everyone else is using and slapping slightly different logos onto them?

Look, it’s not hard. Cycling teams have been doing this for over a century now, with some pretty tremendous results like the Mondrian-inspired jersey that’s shownin this post. All it takes is a little effort, a little more money and a desire to stand out from the crowd. Sadly, without that last one, no one will attempt the other two, and that’s why sponsored shooter jerseys will continue to all look the same.

Buzz Guns.

Buzzfeed, that bastion of liberal muckracking, goes to Taran Tactical in an attempt to re-create that iconic Keanu Reeves 3 Gun run with a couple of regular joes.

What’s expected to happen next, doesn’t. They actually do a fair, even-handed report, and also manage to toss in a few talking points about how guns are the ultimate in women empowerment and how insanely fun it is to shoot 3 Gun.

More of this, please. Much more. This is what guns becoming part of lifesyle should look like.

Musical Interlude

I didn’t go see The Police when they re-united and toured a few years ago, because I wanted to remember them as when I first saw them, 0ver 35 years ago, playing in a hockey arena in small city on the edge of the Canadian Rockies.

I didn’t go, because I didn’t want to see my heroes get old.

But New Order? I’ll go see New Order any time, anywhere.