Colt Competition .45 ACP 1911 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 601-700

Colt Competition .45 ACP 1911 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 601-700

I started this test with the intent to prove that a budget (sub-$1000) 1911 in .45ACP could stand up to a 2000 Round Challenge, and so far, so good. Something I didn’t know before I started, though, is that Greg Ellifritz has a list of the best 1911’s out there, and Colt is on the list.

This gives me hope.

One of the things that’s probably helping the reliability of my test gun is that I’m using nothing but Wilson Combat magazines in the test 1911. It’s fairly well-known that magazines are the Achille’s heel of the 1911, and I made the decision early on to use top-quality mags, and so far, so good.

I went shooting with Jeff Street last week and put 100 rounds of Remington UMC .45 ACP through the Colt Competition. Nothing happened except a big, ragged hole appeared in the target. This is getting boring. Boring is good.

Colt Competition 2000 Round Challenge

Rounds Fired:
100 Rounds Remington UMC .45ACP FMJ

Results:

No issues.

Thanks to Lucky Gunner for providing the ammo for this test.

Colt Competition .45 ACP 1911 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 351-450

Colt Competition .45 ACP 1911 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 351-450

In addition to calling an end to the Ruger LCP2 test, I also put one hundred rounds of Lucky Gunner’s .45ACP ammo through the 1911 during that same trip to Shoot Center, working on one-handed shooting and reloads. Not much to report here: Everything worked, nothing blew up, the gun just ran.

Bor-ing. So far, this entry-level 1911 is doing what you want a gun to do: Shoot, shoot accurately and shoot all the time.

My reloads are noticeably slower than with my double-stack guns, which I attribute to a combination of the smaller mag opening in the grip of the 1911 and the forgiving triangular prism shape of the top of a double stack mag. I’m going to work with a timer a bit to see which is faster for me on my reloads: Hitting the slide stop release with my thumb, or going over the top and reaching the slide. I suspect that as it stands now, they’ll be pretty much the same, but hitting the slide stop faster will be better for my times in the long run, although running the slide is the more useful of the two as it applies to just about every gun out there.

Colt Competition 2000 Round Challenge

Rounds Fired:

100 Rounds Sellier And Bellot .45ACP

Results:

No issues.

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 1751-1850.

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 1751-1850.

I took the gun up to Shoot Center to do some indoor range work with the Crimson Trace green laser I have on the gun. I can see the dot during the day, but it’s indoors where it really shines.

Yes, I meant to write that.

The MagTech and Fiocchi ammo I had been using in this test caused this gun no end of troubles, so I loaded up my mags with Federal Premium .380 from Lucky Gunner, and I headed off to the range, where something interesting happened: I couldn’t hit crap with the laser, but did ok with the minimal iron sights on that little gun. Here’s the same target, shot at 10 yards with irons vs. laser.

While neither target is a shining example of marksmanship, something happened when I saw that green dot show up on the target, and BLAMMO, I jerked the trigger. However, when I lined up the sights, I took my time and pressed the trigger and managed to deliver acceptable results for a .380 pistol that’s slightly bigger than an index card. I’m *used* to the lousy sights on this gun, what I’m not used to is the green dot. More work on this is needed, but at a later date because I’m calling an end to the test.

Yep, that’s right, the 2000 round test of the LCP2 is ending 250 rounds short of the goal. On the 87th shot of my session, the pistol threw a Failure To Eject malfunction at me, and I’ve had enough. The gun was reasonably reliable through the first 500 rounds, but boy howdy did things go downhill from there.

Ammunition-wise, this was the tale of the tape. From what I’ve seen, if you get a change to shoot MagTech in an LCP2, don’t.

RoundQuan. ShotFTEFTF
Hornady Critical Defense 90 Grain JHP24
Tula Ammo 91 Grain FMJ12
Speer Gold Dot 90 Grain JHP6
Winchester White Box 95 Grain FMJ5062
Hornady Custom XTP 90 Grain JHP2
PMC Bronze 90 Grain FMJ85021
Magtech 95 Grain FMJ1004
Fiocchi 95 Grain FMJ1002
Federal American Eagle 95 Grain FMJ1001
Blazer Brass FMJ95 Grain 50

The LCP2 is a pocket pistol, not a service pistol. It’s not built to the same standards as, say, an S&W M+P or a Glock, and it turns out there’s a reason why they’re called “service” pistols… they’re meant to stay in service and not barf up ammo after 500 rounds.

Now, does this mean that the LCP2 is a bad choice for a defensive gun? No, not at all. Pocket guns just are not designed to take the same abuse as a service pistol and are rarely have even 500 rounds put through them over the course of their lifetime (although I was kinda hoping this one would go further into the test than it did).

Bottom line is if you have an LCP2 is that unless you’re as dumb as I was and took things to the extreme, you little gun will serve you well. Put 100 or so rounds through it a year to maintain competency, and save the torture tests for the guns that can take the abuse.

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge Results

Rounds Fired
100 Rounds Federal Premium FMJ 

Total Rounds Fired: 1750
One possible failure to eject on round 116
Failures to eject: Rounds 400, 489, 974, 993, 1277, 1323, 1359, 1737
Failure to feed: Round 873, 1526, 1534, 1556, 1583

Colt Competition 1911 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 226 – 350

Colt Competition 1911 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 226 – 350

I brought the Colt out to one of Step By Step’s Shoot N Scoot events last week to work on shooting in a match without the pressure of placement and to re-shoot stages where I screw up. I’ve written before about how the Shoot N Scoot is a good on-ramp for new gun owners,  but it’s also a great way for more advanced shooters to learn from their mistakes in a short period of time.

The stages are all-steel, easy to shoot and the longest stage was 22 rounds, making them easy to shoot with an eight-round mag. I concentrated on muzzle control with two hands and one-handed shooting with the 1911, and while much more work is needed, at last I understand the scope of the problem now.

Colt Competition 2000 Round Challenge

Rounds Fired:

250 Rounds Remington UMC 230 Grain FMJ
100 Rounds Sig Sauer 230 Grain FMJ

Results:

No issues.

I also put my first 100 rounds through the Beretta APX I have on loan, and it’s a nice little service pistol. While it’s about the same size as a Glock, it’s got better sights (3 dot night sights*) and a better trigger. Looking forward to putting this gun to more use.

 

* Note that I said “better,” not “optimal.” I’m not that big of a fan of three dot sights, but they are better than what Glocks ship with.

Colt Competition 1911 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 1 – 225

Colt Competition 1911 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 1 – 225

Let me state upfront that I do not have a zillion rounds through a 1911. I grew up in Western Canada, so pistol shooting was completely unknown to me before I moved to the U.S. Before getting in this gun, I had maybe a hundred rounds or so through a 1911 in my entire life, so I am not comparing this gun to other 1911s, I am comparing it to what I know, namely DA/SA guns both metal and plastic, and striker-fired service pistols

So here are my initial thoughts on the 1911, and this Colt Competition in particular.

The trigger is fantastic: A surprise trigger break is easy to achieve even with this entry—level gun, and I can see why people like the 1911 so much. Recoil is more than with my all-metal CZ75, but it easy to manage in a  full-size 45 like the Colt, and it was super easy to punch out the center of a target 7 yards away, even under rapid fire. Coming from the CZ, with its skinnier slide, I’m used to riding my thumbs up high on the frame because there’s room there to do so. This is not going to work with a 1911.

The front sight on the Colt Competition is a little thicker than what I’m used to, but that larger front sight definitely helps me acquire it faster at speed. The ergonomics on the gun are terrific… seriously, why did gun designers see a need to screw around with this design? The slide stop is right where it should be, the safety is super easy to activate or deactivate, and everything just FITS.

I picked up the pistol from my FFL, and lubed it with some Tetra gun grease on the slide and some Brownell’s gun oil everywhere else, then headed out the range to break it in. I fired off 100 rounds of Remington UMC 230 grain FMJ from Lucky Gunner just to get used to the gun and how it handled, and also to practice with my new holster for the gun, a Red Hill Tactical Kydex holster in a nice rich shade of brown.

One thing I have to consider in this test is that I’ll be shooting USPSA matches quite often with this gun, and that means dropping magazines into the fine sugar sand we call soil here in SW Florida. Add in the fact that the reliability of the 1911 is closely tied to the magazines than just about any other pistol out there, and you can see the quandary I’m in. The point of the 2000 Round Challenge is to test the reliability of the gun under average conditions, and I’m not sure that dropping mags into sand, reloading them and then using them again is “average” conditions. As such, when I shoot a match, I’ll let you know, and I’ll be cleaning the magazines (but not the gun) after every match.

Speaking of which, I shot a match last week, the Thursday night USPSA match at Hansen Gun Club, and I used the Colt to shoot it. And I sucked, of course. I was slow, but the interesting thing was, because I was dealing with a lot of eight shots per port shooting locations, I was paying a LOT more attention to accuracy than if I was shooting it with my ten rounds per magazine Production gun.

An example.

Yes, my splits are glacially slow, and yes, you can time my movement on the stage with an hourglass, but I was in the top third on total stage points on every stage in the match.

I’ll take it.

In the mean time, here’s where we stand after the first 250 rounds through the entry-level Colt Competition 1911:

Colt Competition 2000 Round Challenge

Rounds Fired:

125 Rounds Remington UMC 230 Grain FMJ
100 Rounds Sig Sauer 230 Grain FMJ

Results:

No issues.

Gimme The Roots, The Radicals

Gimme The Roots, The Radicals

Colt CompetitionGimme the roots, you know I’m a radical.

I’ve wanted a 1911 for a long time, and so I reached out to Colt for one of their Colt Competition 1911’s in .45ACP. I’m writing a story for the NRA about trying to get back to the roots of IPSC/USPSA, so that means shooting a 1911, because that’s where it all began. It was also important to me to get a *Colt* 1911, because while “Colt 45” might be associated with Billy Dee Williams, the name Colt has also been associated with the 1911 since, well, 1911.

In conjunction with this, I’m also going to try a 2000 Round Challenge with this pistol. The late Todd Green showed us that yes, a 1911 can be REALLY reliable, but the gun he used in his test was a higher-end 1911 in 9mm. I want to see how reliable a plain-Jane, entry-level 1911 is actually is, so it’s 2000 rounds or bust for this gun.

Let’s see what happens.

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 1501 – 1650.

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 1501 – 1650.

This report covers both the 50 rounds I shot in Chuck Haggard‘s class at TacCon and 100 rounds I shot this weekend.

It’s also the most failures I’ve had with this gun so far, but I blame that on the fact I was shooting MagTech and Fiocchi ammo, neither of which this gun particularly likes.

Shooting Chuck’s class really brought out what a little gun like this was capable of, and what it’s not. Unless your last name is “Miculek” you are not going to shoot this gun beyond 15 yards, and even 7 yards can get iffy. But at most civilian gun fight distances, yeah, it’s plenty accurate enough, even to perform Mozambique/Failure To Stop drills at speed.

With four feeding issues in 150 rounds, we’re starting to see what happens when the round count on a little gun rises up into four digits. I’ve got 250 rounds of Federal Premium .380ACP from Lucky Gunner sitting in my ammo box, and how well that ammo performs in this gun will determine if I go the full 2000 rounds or not.

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge Results

Rounds Fired
50 Rounds Magtech .380 ACP FMJ
50 Rounds Winchester .380 ACP FMJ
50 Rounds Fiocci .380 ACP FMJ

Total Rounds Fired: 1600
One possible failure to eject on round 116
Failures to eject: Rounds 400, 489, 974, 993, 1277, 1323, 1359
Failure to feed: Round 873, 1526, 1534, 1556, 1583

 

 

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 1400 – 1500

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 1400 – 1500

Or. I got 99 problems and I Mozambique’d every one of them.

As the LCP2 is chambered in .380, a round that is marginal for self-defensive purposes, shot placement and penetration are what is going to get the job done, not “stopping power”*, I spent this range session doing Failure To Stop drills with my LCP2 from three yards out to ten yards, and also did a few of the walkback drills I learned in ECQC, where the gun is extended out enough to get good hits on-target, but not so far out that your opponent can get ahold of it. Seven yards is about the maximum for me for headshots with this gun, but I can do center-mass all day long at 10 to 15 yards.

This is why we play the game… so we can find the limits of ourselves and our equipment.

Gun-wise, everything went the way it should… I placed all my hits either in the center-chest and ocular cavity, and the LCP2 chewed up and spit out 50 rounds of Winchester White Box and 50 rounds of Blazer Brass from Lucky Gunner with no trouble whatsoever, which makes a nice change from the last range session…. maybe something about that Magtech ammo just doesn’t sit well with this gun.

So, three-quarters of the way done, here’s where we stand:

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge Results

Rounds Fired
50 Rounds Blazer Brass .380 FMJ
50 Rounds Winchester .380 ACP

Total Rounds Fired: 1500
One possible failure to eject on round 116
Failures to eject: Rounds 400, 489, 974, 993, 1277, 1323, 1359
Failure to feed: Round 873


* Using “stopping power” to describe what pistol does is relatively equivalent to using “celibacy” to describe the antics of Kim Kardashian…

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 1261 – 1399

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 1261 – 1399

Another day, another 140-ish rounds of Lucky Gunner’s .380 ammo through the little LCP2. This time out, it was just a slog to put as many rounds through the pistol as fast as I could, as today was a father-son range day with my youngest son, and my priority was helping him shoot, not running a test on this gun.

The LCP2 had one of it’s worst outings ever: 3 Failure to Ejects in under 140 rounds of shooting. While not a good thing, this is not too surprising to see as we approach the conclusion of this test. Two of the FTE’s were with Magtech ammo, and the other was with Fiocchi. The 39 rounds of Winchester White Box I put through it worked just fine.

A boy and his plinkster

Helping my youngest son with his shooting was the highlight of the day, by far. He’s a decent shot with my Marlin Plinkster, and he’s starting to love my red-dotted Smith&Wesson M22A. He owns a Remington 514, but I think he needs something more robust now that he’s older.

M22A and a young boy

Another highlight happened when we were loading mags: Bambi showed up to munch a bit on the sweet, sweet clover that was all over the ground of the backyard range we were shooting in, and offered up some suggestions about stance and trigger pull as we were shooting.

Everyone’s a critic.

Bambi and guns

And chill out: That Plinkster was empty, and there is a chamber flag in it. We were safe to load mags at that table.

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge Results

Rounds Fired
50 Rounds Fiocchi 95 gr .380 ACP
50 Rounds MagTech .380 ACP
39 Rounds Winchester .380 ACP

Total Rounds Fired: 1399
One possible failure to eject on round 116
Failures to eject: Rounds 400, 489, 974, 993, 1277, 1323, 1359
Failure to feed: Round 873

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 1141-1260

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 1141-1260

I managed to squeeze in a little range time earlier this month to try out my new Comp-Tac Holster (spoiler alert: I *love* it) and shoot some more rounds through the LCP ][.

I started out with 70 rounds of Mozambique drill practice, done from 5 yards, and I’m kinda happy with the results.

Aside from the four obvious jerks (more on that later), that dude ain’t goin’ nowhere. I then threw caution into the wind and tried a Dot Torture at three yards, with predictable results.

Whoops

What’s interesting is what I learned from the shots I missed: Pretty much every missed shot on that target was because I was using the laser to aim, not my sights, and when I saw the green dot wobbling around on-target, I snatched the trigger, with very predictable results. When I took my time to aim, as I did on Dot 3, I did pretty well.

Lesson learned.

The other half of the range session was devoted to working with the new holster for my CZ P07 Duty, a Comp-Tac CTAC. I’d been hanging on too long the Crossbreed I first got for it, to my everlasting shame. With a class with Ernest Langdon in my future, I wanted something I could use with confidence on the range and in everyday life. The CTAC more than fits that bill. It uses kydex to hold the gun, with two leather bolsters attached to belt clips to help keep the gun comfortable. The kydex extends up and covers the slide of your pistol, yet still allows you to get a full firing grip on the gun before you draw it from the holster.

I started out shooting a series of ball and dummy drills, and then switched to shooting another Dot Torture with the CZ and the new holster, and quickly ran into an issue with shooting it one-handed. To be honest, I’d concentrated so much on shooting my striker-fired S&W Shield these past few months, running the DA/SA trigger on the P07 with just one hand proved to be my undoing, and I totally bombed both the strong hand and support hand parts of the drill.

So I finished things up with just shooting one dot with one hand, mixing in double action and single action until I was satisfied with the results.

And I am.

All in all, a good range session. I shot 120 rounds through the LCP][, with no hiccups whatsoever.

Rounds Fired: 120 Rounds Winchester White Box .380 ACP

2000 Round Challenge Results
Total Rounds Fired: 1260
One possible failure to eject on round 116
Failures to eject: Rounds 400, 489, 974, 993
Failure to feed: Round 873

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