Ruger Did It Again.

Ruger Did It Again.

First, it was ripping off my idea for a slogan, now they’re ripping off my ideas for guns.

Me, five years ago:

Bring Back The PC-9

A few reasons.

  • There are very few inexpensive but nice 9mm carbines. There’s the Beretta CX4, and then my choices are pricey (9mm upper), average (Kel-Tec Sub2k) or charitably low-end (Hi-Point).
  • Caracal’s coming out with one, so is Tavor and Saiga’s got a new one too. If there weren’t the demand for them, they wouldn’t make ’em. Speaking of which…
  • “Tactical Carbine/Shotgun” matches are popping up all over the place, allowing people shoot 3 Gun-style matches without having to deal with rifle-strength targets or have a 300+ yard range nearby.
  • A 9mm Carbine makes a dandy home-defense long gun, giving you the increased control and added thump of more muzzle velocity of a long gun without the over-penetration worries of a rifle-caliber carbine.
  • And it makes a dandy bug-out gun, too. Having to carry around one kind of ammo and carry one set of magazines makes a lot of sense when you’re dealing with limited space and weight. A 9mm carbine maxes out at about 100 yards, but that’s all you’ll be likely to need in anything other than a complete and total “SHTF” scenario.

Memo to Ruger: Take the PC-9, slap on the furniture from your tactical Mini-14, and you’re there.

Ruger, today:

Ruger 9mm Carbine

I need to send them an invoice for services rendered. This is getting ridiculous.

If this carbine comes in anywhere near Kel-Tec Sub2000 prices, they have a winner on their hands. And considering that 90% of the tooling for this gun probably already exists, it just might do exactly that.

UPDATE: The post is now live at Recoil. $549 MSRP, so expect to see street prices starting about $100 below that. Takes 10/22 trigger components.  Wowza. This is a) a shot across the bow of Kel-Tec and b) going to put some serious price pressure on the 9mm AR market.

Ruger LCP II 2000 Round Challenge : Rounds 223-383

Ruger LCP II 2000 Round Challenge : Rounds 223-383

Even though most of my free time is spoken for (there should be an announcement on what I’ve been working on in the next two weeks or so). Nevertheless, I found some time this weekend to duck out for some range time and continue this test (thanks, Jason!).

Odds and Sods.

I’ve got a bunch of partially-full boxes of .380 ammo laying around, so I spent this range session burning through them and freeing up space in my ammo cans, along with shooting some of the PMC .380 provide to me by the good people at Lucky Gunner, so I loaded up them all up and shot them.

Because that’s what you do with ammo and guns, that’s why.

Ammo Fired
6 Speer Gold Dot JHP’s
11 Winchester White Box FMJ’s
2 Hornady XTP JHP’s (why I had just two of them, I’ll never know)
142 PMC .380 FMJ’s

All the rounds fired and fed with no issues, bringing the total round count up to 383 rounds fired, with one possible failure to feed on round 116 of the challenge.

One thing that’s interesting to note is that I shot 48 rounds strong hand only and 24 rounds weak-hand only with the LCP II during this range session. The gun felt surprisingly good in just my strong hand and I was able to shoot it as asccurate as I could with two hands, just a bit slower while doing so. In the weak hand however, ho boy, it first weird, and I am fairly used to weak-hand shooting. I don’t know how to describe it beyond saying it felt more like a water gun in my hand, not a real pistol.

As I said, weird.

Also, the gun is quite easy to shoot for extended periods of time compared to my P3AT (which, I realize, is quite a low hurdle to cross). I had no problems dropping 3 boxes of ammo in out of this gun, and left the range with the same amount of pain in my right hand as when I arrived.

That is to say, none. Not a bad accomplishment for any pocket 380, especially a lightweight polymer one.