After Class Report: AED/CPR/Trauma First Aid With Geoff Fahringer

After Class Report: AED/CPR/Trauma First Aid With Geoff Fahringer

CPR Training In Naples

I’ve had my CPR certification for over a decade now and it’s up for renewal yet again, so when Step By Step Gun Training announced they were doing their first-ever CPR / AED / Trauma class, I jumped on the opportunity, especially because of the last bit, the trauma care part.

The last few times I’ve taken Toronto CPR training, it’s been in a class targeted towards teachers and caregivers to the elderly who need to be certified in such things, and so any talk of advanced first-aid care (and especially trauma care) was quickly glossed over.

Not this class.

First, a word about the instructor. Geoff Farhinger is a veteran Collier County SWAT officer and police dive instructor. He’s a judge at the national SWAT competition up in Orlando and is trained in the the Florida Tactical EMS program as well.

In short, he knows his stuff.

The class was four hours long, and it was a nice balance between instructor-led teaching and hands-on (literally) training. It wasn’t all-tactical, all the time, and it wasn’t aimed at healthcare providers, either. The balance of CPR, AED and trauma training in the class was just about right for we armed civilians, and I walked away knowing even more about all those subjects than I did before, which is the goal of this, right? As armed civilians, we are the REAL first responders (cops, firefighters, EMS… they all arrive after we do) and as first responders, we should be ready, no matter what the emergency.

Is a heart attack a possible occurrence here in God’s Waiting Room, or is drowning possible here in the swimming pool capitol of the world? Is an accidental discharge into a person more likely for me compared to others because I’m around guns more often than the average person?

Oh yeah.

So while I did walk away with a better knowledge about how to set a tourniquet and a glimmer of an idea of how to deal with a gut shot or chest wound (more knowledge on those things in the future would be a good thing for me), the fact is, what I learned was the beginning of my journey, not the end. The training I received in this class is highly relevant to my entire life, not just my life as an armed civilian, and that makes me want to learn more. However, I am much more confident now in my ability to protect my life with my first aid/trauma kits, and (real or not) I’m feeling a little better about my ability to deal with what life may throw at me.

Which is the reason why we’re doing this, right? There was a couple in the class learning CPR who had their adult daughter pass away recently after an unexpected adverse medical reaction. The couple started CPR, but despite their best efforts and efforts of the paramedics and hospital staff, nothing could be done.

Kinda brings it all home, doesn’t it?

If you get a chance to train with Geoff or take a similar class that covers all the bases of the basics of saving a life, take it. The next class is coming up in a few weeks and if you’re in south Florida, I highly recommend you attend.

Thin Is In.

Thin Is In.

“Absorb what is useful, discard what is useless and add what is specifically your own.”

– Bruce Lee

For quite some time now , I’ve been trying to come up with a way to carry around a trauma kit on my person with the same ease and assurance that I’ve carried around a pistol.

And it’s not been easy. First, I tried to try to find a way to carry around this “Pocket” Trauma kit, and I wound up filleting that kit even further to fit it inside a mobile phone case in a quest for an even-smaller kit.

But even that wasn’t small enough because the case clearly showed up under my shirt. Sure, it wound up looking like the iPhone case it really was, but when it comes to how much we show the world about what we’re carrying, I agree with Lucas Apps and I also agree with Greg Ellifritz. I agree with Lucas in that 99% of the people who might even notice a bulge under our shirts will dismiss it as a cell phone or something innocuous, but the problem is, as Greg says, the 1% who think it’s a gun will either a) not care or b) care quite a lot because they are up to no good.

Seeing as how that last one half of one percent is one of the reasons why I carry a gun in the first place, the trick is coming up with trauma care solution that will work well in an emergency situation yet doesn’t leave me looking I’ve got Batman’s utility belt hidden under my t-shirt.

Which bring me to this video by Paul Gomez and the humble triangular bandage. It works, and it takes up pretty much zero space. I can stuff a bandage and two small packs of Celox into a coin purse, slide it into one of my rear pants pockets and a bandanna into the other one, and if anyone notices anything, it looks like I’m carrying a bandanna and a wallet in my pockets, because, well, I am.

What’s the first rule of hiding something in plain sight? Help people see what they’re expecting to see, even if it’s not really there.

Assorted trauma gear

That’s my old iPhone trauma kit on the left, but this photo doesn’t do justice to how portable and concealable the new kit really is. The bandanna is there because bandannas are massively useful: They can be used as a compress, to stuff wounds, to wipe the sweat off your brow or as a hankie, as needed. The bandages, Celox and two small safety pins are in the coin purse to keep them in one spot and to help protect them from being sat upon for hours on end. That feeling of constantly sitting on something took some getting used to, as I haven’t carried a wallet in my back pocket for twenty years. Fortunately, I got used to it pretty quickly, because this solution is THIN.

How thin you ask? This thin.

Thin, concealable tourniquets

That’s my iPhone-based trauma kit on the left, which is still less thin than a double-stack pistol magazine, yet a bit too big and bulky for true concealment under a t-shirt (at least for me).

We know, from trial and (much) error that thinner guns are easier to carry and conceal, and yet we still insist that the only correct solution for civilian trauma care is a military-approved tourniquet or (worse yet) an IFAK. No, it is not an optimal solution, but it is a solution I can carry around pretty much every day. Think of it as the trauma care equivalent of a pocket .380, and you’ll understand my reasoning here.

IFAKs are great and they save lives, but they are a military solution to a civilian problem. The live-saving technology that started out in the military is starting to trickle down to those of us who don’t carry an M4 for a living, and that’s a good thing. However, just because I don’t walk around with an M4 and a chest rig doesn’t mean there’s not a need for a trauma care solution that works for the civilian market but incorporates the hard-won lessons from the military. We are just beginning to figure out civilian-centric solutions to trauma care, and I’m excited to see what’s coming down the road. For now, though, I think I’ve finally figured out what works for me on a day-in, day out basis.

Current Casual EDC

Current Casual EDC

A quick update now that I’m carrying around a smaller trauma kit.

sheild_edc

Clockwise from upper left:

And I normally carry an SOG Mini Instinct as well, along the centerline of my body. All of this easily conceals in a normal pair of jeans underneath an untucked t-shirt, and I’ve carried in on 3+ mile walks as well. I’m pretty happy with what I’ve got now, and barring any changes like a new laser, this should be my “go to” for days when I don’t have to play dress-up in the office.

Update: Rats, hit “Publish” instead of “Save”. Oh well, you’ll find out more about the trauma kit tomorrow.

Building A Concealed Carry Trauma Kit That’s Actually Concealable.

Building A Concealed Carry Trauma Kit That’s Actually Concealable.

I have been struggling mightily to come up with a way to carry a trauma kit (or a reasonable facsimile thereof) day in, day out. I have my one in my car, one if I’m not in my car, and one at work. That’s all very well and good, but the fact remains that all those kits are NEAR me, not WITH me, and that can make a difference in how quickly and effectively I can render aid to someone who’s life is on the line.

We use the phrase “When seconds count, the police are just minutes away” quite a lot in the concealed carry community, but somehow, we don’t stop and think that seconds also count with saving lives from the possible effects of gunshot wound. We wouldn’t consider ourselves ready for a gunfight if our gun was in the car, why then would we consider ourselves to be ready to deal with the effects of a gunfight if our trauma kit is in the car?

I’ve tried to carry a Cleer EDC Kit, and while it’s terrific, it still is just a little too big to conceal under an untucked t-shirt, and the Patrol Officer’s “Pocket Trauma Kit” is not made for civilian pockets.

However, whilst perusing the aisles of my local Big Blue Box Store, I spotted a “Quick Seal” wound care kit that looked tiny enough to carry every day.

And it is.

image

As you can see in the photo, I ditched everything in the store-bought kit except two small containers of Celox, two gauze pads and an antiseptic pad, and teamed those items up with gloves and a SWAT-T tourniquet, and stuffed all of that into a MOLLE-compatible iPhone 6+ case, and it works quite well.

image

That’s my extra mag for my Shield on theright, in its belt pouch for a size comparison. Crunching down everything this small did involve some trade-offs. There’s not a lot of blood-clotting agent in this kit, and SWAT-T tourniquet isn’t perhaps the best solution out there, but it beats jetting out arterial blood at 60 beats a minute. Also, because the tourniquet is essentially just a big rubber band, it folds flat. This means that when teamed up with the soft nylon iPhone case, it wraps around my waist when I carry it, rather than remain stiff and inflexible and noticeable, because when it comes to concealed carry, thinness is the most important attribute a gadget can have.

Would I carry this kit if I were headed out to Khandahar tomorrow? No, I’d carry an IFAK, probably more than one. Will it help save lives more than not having it on me? Yes, and that’s reason enough for me to