Pirates Of The Pirates Of The Caribbean.

Sean Sorrentino posted a terrific Marc MacYoung piece on ‘The Disneyland State Of Mind“, a mindset that Marc describes as slightly (or more than slightly) out of control and believes that dammit, I have a RIGHT to a good time, and HOW DARE YOU INTERRUPT ME HAVING A GOOD TIME!!!!!

I’ve written about how that applies to the interrupted good times of the Democratic Party over at Ricochet, but it also applies to our personal lives as well. To be honest, I was kinda troubled by how NORMAL it felt for me to carry around a knife and trauma kit inside a theme park. I mean, I’m on vacation, I’m SUPPOSED to be relaxing in a care-free environment with my family, and here I am wondering about how I’m going to smuggle things like a pointy-stabby blade past security.

And then I watched a violent domestic argument break out in front of me. No, I didn’t intervene, (because that’s what park security is for), but yes, it did wake me up to the fact that even though I was on vacation, reality itself was not on vacation, and bad things can and do happen in the happiest of places.

Having the means to defend myself and potentially deal with the consequences of lethal force didn’t affect my ability to have a good time. In fact, keeping an eye out for trouble also let me see the good things around me, like how many people around me were having as much fun as we were having inside the park. Being aware of what’s going around you means you’re aware of the good things going on around you, not just the bad things. It leads to a bigger life that’s more-connected with reality, not paranoia and fear.

Live in the moment. ALL of the moments.


Update: I wrote this post and queued it up for publishing before Monday night’s horror. If anything, it’s any more appropriate now.

Current Semi-Formal Carry

As I’m carrying around the LCP][ now instead of a P3AT, I thought a brief update was in order. Clockwise from upper left.

Looking over everything, I could really use a tourniquet of some kind and more options for less-lethal. However, there is just X amount of room in a pair of dress pants, and since the strong-side front pocket is completely dedicated to gun and holster, the weak side pocket has to carry everything else, and it can get a little crowded in there.

And no, carrying in an ankle holster is right out. Can’t stand the way they feel, and I tend to cross my legs when I’m sitting, increasing the odds of something on my ankle getting spotted.

Ruger LCPII 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 485 – 635

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge

LCPII FTEMy life’s been pretty hectic these past few weeks, but now that I’m back home (for awhile, at least), I had the time to head out to the range and put more rounds through the LCPII.

Really starting to like this little gun.

The range session did not start well: I had a Failure To Eject on round #4 of the first magazine, but the other 149 rounds ran fine. I concentrated on running the gun in some drills more oriented to self-defense, as I’ve decided to start carrying the LCPII four days out of seven, and this little gun did not disappoint.

One thing I’m finding out about this gun is that it’s surprisingly easy to shoot one-handed. A gun this small doesn’t have a lot of real eastate for your weak hand to hand onto and it’s so light, it’s easy to hold for long period of times in one hand. As a result, going from two-handed to strong hand only is not that big of a jump, and shooting it one-handed doesn’t affect accuracy all that much. Speed, yes (the lil’ sucker does jump around a bit), but accuracy, no.

CLP Defensive Drills

That’s 150 rounds of PMC Bronze FMJ shot as fast as I could settle the sights near the target and as fast as I could pull the trigger. I didn’t have a timer running, but based on other range days with this gun, I’m guessing my splits were around 0.3 to 0.5 seconds. Is that fast enough to become a BUG Gun Master? Oh no. Is it fast accurate enough to make it through a lethal force encounter?

Probably.

All 150 rounds were shot from hree to seven yards distance. This is NOT a long-range gun, 7 yards (maybe even 10, on a good day) is about the furthest distance I’d feel comfortable shooting this gun. Most of the 150 rounds were shot with both hands on the gun, though some were shot strong hand / weak hand only (about 50 rounds or so). Some were shot with diagonal or backwards movement, some not. The point of this wasn’t to put a one-hole group on paper, it was to see how the gun and myself work under stressful conditions, and I’m satisfied with the results so far.

But I’m always trying to get better.

One FTE on round #4, (round number 489 since it was cleaned, and the 3rd FTE so far).

Rounds Fired : 150
150 Rounds PMC Bronze

2000 Round Challenge Results
Total Rounds Fired: 635.
One possible failure to eject on round 116, two failures to eject, rounds 400 and 489.

Begin with Agreement and work from there.

The “conversation about guns” is turning in our direction. Keep it going. People, even liberals, are starting to understand that they are their own first responder. Emphasize safety, both yours and everyone else’s. No one thinks you shouldn’t protect your kids. No one thinks that learning first aid is a bad idea. No one thinks that flashlights aren’t handy. Nobody freaks out over a Swiss Army knife, except over-enthusiastic enforcers of “zero tolerance” policies. Start with the points you agree on, then work from there. Make it personal. Talk about your family, and how your love for them drives what you’re doing. Bring it down from the 10,000 foot level of “SHALL NOT BE INFRINGED!” and the finer points of Constitutional Law to stories about why you want to stay safe. If they have a point that you agree on, like keeping guns out of the hands of violent felons or away from toddlers, agree with them, because it makes you and your positions more reasonable. Gun owners have been portrayed as wanting to shove guns into the hands of four year olds.

Prove them wrong.

Stand And Deliver… Sales.

Dear Acusport.

I love you. You know I do. You were our #1 vendor when I worked in the biz, and you have your @$#! together at a level that most other wholesalers only DREAM of having.

But.

You’re leaving cash on the table when it comes to accessories and weird special orders.

Special orders for a gun store are a nightmare. There is so much that can go wrong, and they take up so much time for so little profit. Researching the proper part number and then sending in an order for, say, a mag release button for a Glock 34 takes so much time,  a gun store will actually LOSE money on the sale, and if they say “We don’t do special orders,” they’ll lose the customer to Brownell’s or Midway.

Whether or not the customer has the time and willpower to navigate through those often-confusing sites is a topic for another day.

Instead of p!ssing off gun stores and customers alike, Acusport, why not turn yourself into the NFDN of gun parts, and set up in-store kiosks with all your stuff? Stores could set their own prices on their kiosks and then regulate which areas of your catalog they want to allow their customers to access. That way, if a customer comes in asking for all the weird stuff that customers ask for (but are a pain in the @$$ to stock), they can buy it at their local gun store and get it shipped right to them, and the gun store makes as much (or more) money off the process than they would have in the first place.

Oh, and as an added bonus, maybe have VOIP built into the shopping app (and a headset with video) so you can do the customer service as well. Net cost to you: A cheapo Android tablet and headset. Net benefit: More sales for you, and more sales for the gun stores who will have a steady stream of customers coming in to use the app.

You’re welcome.

Cajun Gun Works Does Nice Stuff.

Yes, they do take a while to do it, but they turn out really good stuff when they’re done.

I ran into an issue with my P-07 earlier this year: The firing pin in the darn thing wouldn’t pop primers, and I didn’t have a pistol so much as a lightweight polymer club. I had been wanting to change out the sights in it for a while, because the Meprolight night sights on it kinda sucked (the front sight is monstrous and fills up most of the rear notch, making precision shooting with it pretty much impossible. I wanted something that mimicked the same sight picture I got when I shot Bob Vogel’s gun last year, and Cajun Gun Works’ EZ/D sight set looked pretty much the same, so I decided to kill two birds with one FedEx box and send off my P07 to them for repair and new sights.

I’ll have to wait until the weekend to test how well the gun works now, but the new sights are terrific. Clear and precise, with is nice, deep sight rear notch that makes it easy to find the fiber-optic front sight.

CZ P07 Competition sights

Finding a good set of sights for this gun has been a challenge, as it is for any gun with a less-than-Glock market share, but if you’re looking for competition sights for your P-07, take a look at Cajun Gun Works EZ/D sights.

Security Theater.

Those of you who know me on social media know that I spent the weekend at two theme parks in the central Florida area. Both parks are “weapons-free zones” that have metal detectors and bag searches before you walk through the park gates, so surely you couldn’t get a gun or a knife through such air-tight security, right?

And if you believe that, I have a bridge in Gaza to sell you.

I waltzed through the security checkpoints both days with my cell phone, a Coast flashlight (neither of which raised any eyebrows) and my lightweight emergency tourniquet, which looks like the nylon coin purse it really is. I had my Boker knife in my wallet, and on the second day, I carried around the ABDO safe with me, and that passed right through the bag search at the park because it looks like a big ol’ cell phone case it’s meant to look like. I know that I can fit an LCP ][ and a spare mag into that case, which means that even in a non-permissive environment, I can carry a gun along with a cell phone, spare mag, flashlight and a knife, the four things I recommend for concealed carry EVERY day, and also had a tourniquet on me in case that was needed.

Keep in mind that I in no way recommend you do similar, because that might be construed as telling you how to subvert Florida’s gun laws, and that would be a BAD thing, so don’t do this.

Even though you can if you want to.

Trunk Club

There’s been some talk about trunk/truck guns in a Facebook group I belong to, and most of the comments have been against them, citing the risk of having your gun stolen vs. you actually using a gun in your trunk to defend a life.

I can dig it.

However, isn’t that also true of guns inside the home? Despite that, no one who’s serious about guns advises against safely having a gun in the home for self-defense. I also understand that the idea of a trunk gun carries a lot of baggage with it, namely the “I’ll run back to my car, suit up, stop the bad guy and save the day!” sort of thing, and God knows (literally!) how many people suffer from that delusion.

But.

It’s kinda nice knowing that I have something at home with a little more oomph behind it than just a pistol, and it’s nice to know that I have something with me on the road that will allow me to be my own roof Korean if (God forbid) I need to be.

Nothing Today, Kiddies

Sorry, but my phone took a nose-dive over the weekend, so all the time I would have spent coming up with great content was spent trying to restore my life phone instead.

See you tomorrow.