Bon Voyage.

On a recent Safety Solutions podcast, Claude Werner, the Tactical Professor, said that firearms training is not an event, it’s a journey.

He’s right.

But it’s getting people to go on that journey that’s the hard part, because unless they are absolutely forced to so, people don’t like to go on journeys that are not fun. My family and I will gladly travel up to Orlando for two hours in order to go to a theme park, but we are not willing to travel two hours to go eat broccoli.

And I like broccoli.

Also, first impressions matter. I have friends who are seriously into shooting practical pistol competitions, but their first foray into self-defense training was way too “tacticool” and serious for their comfort zone, and they’ve shied away from that area ever since, even though they are great shots and carry a gun on a regular basis.

Making sure the first steps are fun is the key to lifelong learning. Ever watch a preschool teacher? How much of what he/she is teaching involves actual teaching, and how much of what they do is getting their students excited about learning?

That’s why events like Shoot N Scoots are so important. By emphasizing the fun of practical shooting and how you can be safe with a gun on your hip, students think that training and competitions are just as fun as going to the local range and shooting with your friends.

And, of course, it is. We just forget about it from time to time.

However, if the first steps in the journey are difficult and confusing, the student is going to think that the rest of the journey is as horrid. As a result, they’ll put “get more gun training” in the same bucket as “work out more often” and “eat less sugar”… things that we know we SHOULD do, but just don’t see any reason to do so right now.

Want a lifestyle of concealed carry? Make people EAGER to join your classes. Make them not only see a need for training, but also make them feel good about choosing to train with you.