Are We Winning Yet?

Are We Winning Yet?

At one point in time, Wired magazine was a bastion of techno-libertarianism, where articles on cryptography went side-by-side with articles on using the Internet to empower individuals to take charge of their lives.

That era is long-gone, and Wired has veered so far towards progressivism, they endorsed Hillary Clinton for President last year.

Which makes this article on “gunsplaining” rather interesting. The author correctly points out that most attempts at gun control fail because the people who make gun control laws have no friggin’ clue how guns actually work, so they wind up legislating on feelings rather than facts. The problem with that is, of course, that effective laws require precision, and precision and emotion are not usually associated with each other, leading to horrible laws that are easy to circumvent. What the author doesn’t realize, though, is that if liberals learn more about guns, it won’t lead to better gun laws, it’ll lead to fewer gun controls, not more of them. I’m all for more people learning about guns, because once they understand what they can and can’t do, we win.

Every. Single. Time.

Is there a realization on the left that they sound like morons when it comes to guns? I hope so, because that means they are starting to fight this fight on OUR terms, not theirs, and once the enemy is fighting your battle rather than theirs, the path to victory becomes a whole lot clearer.

How Do You Change The World?

How Do You Change The World?

I dunno, let’s ask Steve Jobs how he changed the world. Maybe there’s answers here for us as well.

Playboy: How about some concrete reasons to buy a computer today? An executive in your industry recently said, “We’ve given people computers, but we haven’t shown them what to do with them. I can balance my checkbook faster by hand than on my computer.” Why should a person buy a computer?

Jobs: There are different answers for different people. In business, that question is easy to answer: You really can prepare documents much faster and at a higher quality level, and you can do many things to increase office productivity. A computer frees people from much of the menial work.

Playboy: Those are arguments for computers in business and in schools, but what about the home?

Jobs: So far, that’s more of a conceptual market than a real market. The primary reasons to buy a computer for your home now are that you want to do some business work at home or you want to run educational software for yourself or your children. If you can’t justify buying a computer for one of those two reasons, the only other possible reason is that you just want to be computer literate. You know there’s something going on, you don’t exactly know what it is, so you want to learn. This will change: Computers will be essential in most homes.

Playboy: Was the initial market hobbyists?

Jobs: The difference was that you didn’t have to be a hardware hobbyist with the Apple II. You could be a software hobbyist. That was one of the key breakthroughs with the Apple II: realizing that there were a whole lot more people who wanted to play with a computer, just like Woz and me, than there were people who could build their own.

Let’s pause for a second and re-write those paragraphs a bit.

Playboy: How about some concrete reasons to buy a gun today? An executive in your industry recently said, “We’ve given people guns, but we haven’t shown them what to do with them.

Jobs: There are different answers for different people. In law enforcement, that question is easy to answer. You defend your life and the lives of the innocent much faster and at a longer ranges than just your fists, and you can reduce the danger to yourself. A gun frees people from much of the fist and nightstick work.

Playboy: Those are arguments for guns in law enforcement and the military, but what about the home?

Jobs: So far, that’s more of a conceptual market than a real market. The primary reasons to buy a gun for your home now are that you want to do some recreational shooting or you want you to protect you and your children from a real and specific threat. If you can’t justify buying a gun for one of those two reasons, the only other possible reason is that you just want to be feel safe. You know there’s something going on, you don’t exactly know what it is, so you want to learn.

Playboy: Was the initial market hobbyists?

Jobs: The difference was that you didn’t have to be a hardware hobbyist with the Glock 17. You could be a training hobbyist. That was one of the key breakthroughs with the (product that hasn’t been developed yet… or has it?): realizing that there were a whole lot more people who wanted to enjoy guns, just like Woz and me, than there were people who could build their own.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Guns have the same place in society right now as computers did in back in 1985. Most of us know we should have a gun around, but we struggle to come up with a reason why.

And this part is interesting as well: Jobs was predicting the home internet in 1985, back when the Internet was Arpanet and the .com had just been rolled out.

Jobs: The most compelling reason for most people to buy a computer for the home will be to link it into a nationwide communications network. We’re just in the beginning stages of what will be a truly remarkable breakthrough for most people—as remarkable as the telephone.

Playboy: Specifically, what kind of breakthrough are you talking about?

Jobs: I can only begin to speculate. We see that a lot in our industry: You don’t know exactly what’s going to result, but you know it’s something very big and very good.

What will happen when the personal safety empowerment that a gun provides (and the skills, attitude and courage to use it wisely) gets connected?

Can it get connected? Will connecting gun owners like we connect computers change society, or will it be something else?

The NRA As Tribe, Part 2.

The NRA As Tribe, Part 2.

So a few of my friends are asking why the NRA created this video and is weighing in on the issue of standing for national anthem. What does THAT have to do with gun safety and firearms training?

Well, not a lot, to be honest. But it does have a lot to do with what the NRA sees as it’s future in a world where fear is not a primary driver of gun ownership, setting yourself up as a phyle is actually a pretty darn good idea and as the name of the game from here on out seems to be identity politics, and creating a rally point for traditional American values makes a lot of sense.

The Top Ten Guns Preferred By Professional Gun Users.

The Top Ten Guns Preferred By Professional Gun Users.

The title of this post at Petapixel irked me somewhat: The Top Ten Films Preferred By Professional Photographers.

Umm, ok, so what? Why does it matter if Morty The Wedding Photographer (hey, he makes his living at it, so technically, he IS a professional photographer) likes to shoot 100 ISO color neg film? Does that affect my preference for Fuji Provia over Ektachrome? And just because Pete Turner could make Kodachrome sit up and dance, should I have used it when I was a “professional photographer” instead of relying on the speed and flexibility of E-6 process films?

Of course not.

Bottom line is, find out what works best for you and how you take photos, and make it your own. However, don’t be afraid to adapt to a new system if the situation demands it.

And yes, this post was a metaphor for defensive firearms.

P.S. Tri-X RULES. Maybe the greatest film in the history of everything. You ain’t a sports photog until you’ve rushed back to the darkroom 15 minutes before deadline, ran your TX400 pushed two stops in 110° Rodinal for two minutes and then printed the suckers wet and slapped them on your editor’s desk with two minutes of deadline to spare. You kids and your chimping these days.

Product Review: Holosun HS503C 2 MOA Circle Red Dot Sight

Product Review: Holosun HS503C 2 MOA Circle Red Dot Sight

red dot with circle reticuleAdvantages: Always on, great reticle, long battery life
Disadvantages: Finicky battery compartment
Rating: 5 out of 5

I was shooting a 3 Gun match a few years ago, and I discovered, much to my chagrin, that I had forgotten to turn on my red dot sight before I placed it in the staging barrel, meaning I had to take a few extra seconds to turn it on before I proceeded to shoot the stage. This was embarrassing at a match, but potentially lethal if I needed to defend myself with my rifle.

So I decided to try out some options. First up was a Sigtac CP1 3x scope which did the job, but the reticle was far too confusing for serious work. I then swapped that out on my SU16 for the Leupold 1.5-4x scope I originally got for 3 Gun, and it’s working out just fine.

But that left out my .300 Blackout pistol., and for that, I reached out to Brownells for a Holosun HS503C 2 MOA Circle Red Dot Sight. I was particularly interested in this sight because of it’s auto-brightness, solar cell recharging capability and ridiculously long battery life.

And so far, 3 months into it, I am very impressed with this sight. The sight illumination is always pretty much spot-on, although it does have some issues when I’m in a darker spot and pointing out to a much brighter sport. The reticle itself is clear and sharp, with a 2 MOA center that’s surrounded by a 65 MOA circle. I found that the circle fit neatly inside the torso of a standard USPSA target at 40 yards, making  rapid shots on close targets a breeze, and the 2 MOA dot was a nice, round circle, which, because of my astigmatism, doesn’t happen all that often for me.

I can’t speak to the ruggedness of the sight, as I’ve really not torture-tested it in anyway, but I did run into a spot of trouble when it came time to slide in a battery for the first time (and by “spot of trouble” I mean “I actually had to read the directions to see how things were supposed to work”). The battery itself, after three months of being left constantly on, is still going strong, where by this time, the battery in my Bushnell TRS-25 would have been a useless lump of metal.

I likey.

Bottom line is, if you’re looking for a 1x red dot for defensive or competition purposes, I think you’d be hard-pressed to find a better combination of features and pricing than this little sucker, and it’ll be my first-choice for such things from here on out.


FCC Notice: Brownells gave me this to review, not Holosun. Did I write a glowing review of it because of their generosity? Heck no, I wrote good things about it because it’s a good optic!
Duh.

Offer You Really Shouldn’t Refuse.

Offer You Really Shouldn’t Refuse.

Mike Seeklander has put a bunch of books out for sale directly from him, rather than Amazon, and he’s doing with affiliate marketing so I (and others) will get a piece of the action.

This makes me very, very happy. I fund the blog and most of my training with affiliate links, some to products that I use, some to products I don’t use.

I use Seeklander’s books. They work. You should read them. You’ll get better at shooting if you do.

And if you click on this link or the ad in sidebar, I make a few bucks as well.

Win-win-win.

Attention, Practical Shooting Organizations.

Attention, Practical Shooting Organizations.

USPSA, IDPA, 3 Gun Nation, Rimfire Challenge, the whole lot of you.

Now is your chance.

The NFL is self-immolating itself, and the NBA and Major League Baseball are right behind them. They’ve decided that 50% of the country shouldn’t be watching them play sports, so all of you have a great opportunity to step into the void.

How many of your top-level competitors are former military? How many are current law enforcement?

What are the odds that people who are ticked off by the shenanigans of the NFL would look up to the patriotism of such people?

Is there is a chance that 50% of the country might like to watch a sport where athletes are really and truly role models?

Get to work. You have until the NFL pre-season starts next year to make some hay off of this.

And if you need a hand getting it done, my email address is over there —>.