Presenting The Interactive Pistol Training System

Yep, this is what I’ve been working to bring to fruition these past few months, and quite frankly, there is nothing else like it on the market today.

This is what happens when someone (not me) with 30+ years in the tech world buys a gun and wants to get better at shooting, but then realizes that the products out there are all lacking in one way or another. The Interactive Pistol Training System, or iPTS, is the first all-in-one dry fire trainer.
Period, full stop.

Ok, so what is the iPTS?

First off, it’s electronic, and it uses sensor fusion technology to track everything. Sensor fusion is the same sort of stuff that’s in those driverless cars we’ve been hearing about: It’s a bunch of different detection systems all working together to provide data, not just a laser or not just an accelerometer… it’s everything. The target has sensors on it that work with the pistol to record hits, distance to target… you name it.

The iPTS 1700: Are you ready?

Think about it for a second… Every postal match, everywhere, relies on the shooters being honorable and not cheating about how close they place their target and how fast they’re shooting. The iPTS records all of the data, so there can be no cheating in the match… what you shoot is what you get. The app ties it all together, and we built in “must have” items like a timer and the ability to export your training sessions to email and the like

Oh, and if you think THAT is cool, check out what the Interactive Monitor Target can do. It’s stretch goal, but if it’s reached, I really think it can change how people train with their guns at home or in the classroom.

The pistol will use a BUNCH of accessories from a certain 9mm pistol made in Austria, and fit in the holsters for that gun as well.

And here’s one the many cool things about this system: You know how you turn the darn thing on? You slide in an (inert) mag, and rack the slide.

Makes sense, doesn’t it? And that’s what we’ve tried to do with all of this: Create a system that makes sense, and works with how you shoot. The purpose the iPTS from the very beginning wasn’t to create a system that put a dot on the wall, it was to create a system that would help people become safer and more accurate with a pistol.

We’ll be going live on Indiegogo on April 15th, but for now, check out the website and our “Coming Soon” page and sign up for news on when we launch.

 

I’m In.

Armed Parents

What should pop up in my social media feed right after I finished those last two rants but the news that Melody Lauer is bringing her Armed Parenting Class to Homestead Training Center in December of this year.

I’m in. I am SO in. I’ve been fascinated about this class from the moment I heard about it, for two reasons:

  1. The name of the course is *Contextual* Handgun. Think about that for a second… most (if not all) handgun training takes place in a context-free environment where we students are forced to adapt what we learn to our own lives. The instructor talks about presentation from a holster and post-engagement scan and assess and blah blah blah and then we students have to figure out what may or may not work for us.
    And let’s face it: If I was a single guy in the my late 20’s with no family, the threats that I might face and my reasons for defending myself or others would be quite different than they are now, with a wife and two young sons. If the reasons why were buying guns these days isn’t just “It’s a gun, and I can,” it makes sense to create training classes that are more than just “it’s a gun, here’s how you shoot it,” and yet nobody is doing that.
  2. People who I know and trust (and Bob Owens as well) have taken this course, and they’ve raved about it.

Really looking forward to this.

*Your Ad Here*

Mondrian Cycling TeamFirearms-related companies seem absolutely addicted to sponsoring practical shooters as a means of marketing themselves, and a big part of that, for some insane reason or another, is having the shooter where a jersey to a match with the sponsor’s name on it somewhere, in the hopes that other shooters will see the sponsor’s logo and buy the sponsor’s products.

But have you SEEN the shirts more shooters wear? Can you tell, at a glance, who gives the shooter the most amount of support? No? Then why are the spending the $$$ to sponsor a shooter? Taran Tactical and S&W do a good job of branding their shooters, as did the late, great FN USA and Sig Sauer shooting teams, but other than that, what is there? I’m not asking for something as distinctive as the Lotus 72 (aka the John Player Special and probably the prettiest car ever to race on any track, anywhere), but how can a sponsored shooter stand out from the crowd (and provide more value to his/her sponsors) if all they’re doing is taking the same shirt templates that everyone else is using and slapping slightly different logos onto them?

Look, it’s not hard. Cycling teams have been doing this for over a century now, with some pretty tremendous results like the Mondrian-inspired jersey that’s shownin this post. All it takes is a little effort, a little more money and a desire to stand out from the crowd. Sadly, without that last one, no one will attempt the other two, and that’s why sponsored shooter jerseys will continue to all look the same.

Buzz Guns.

Buzzfeed, that bastion of liberal muckracking, goes to Taran Tactical in an attempt to re-create that iconic Keanu Reeves 3 Gun run with a couple of regular joes.

What’s expected to happen next, doesn’t. They actually do a fair, even-handed report, and also manage to toss in a few talking points about how guns are the ultimate in women empowerment and how insanely fun it is to shoot 3 Gun.

More of this, please. Much more. This is what guns becoming part of lifesyle should look like.

A Good Knife.

To be honest, I will never understand people who leave the house without a knife, phone and a flashlight. Unless you work in a non-permissive environment like behind TSA lines or in a school, it only makes sense to carry around a sharp edge, along with some way of seeing in the dark and a means of communicating beyond yelling at the top of your lungs.

Oh, and a lighter would also be a good idea as well, because being able to start a fire is never not handy.

Part of the problem is, when people say “I want a good knife,” we recommend a tactical folder to them or a confusing mulittool when all they really wanted was something cheap and pointy.

Enter the Opinel folding knife. I got turned on to these almost thirty years ago by a knife-loving friend of mine, and I’ve tried to keep one nearby as often as I could.

opinel_1

The Opinel knife has changed very little since it was introduced almost 100 years ago. It has a simple, twist-lock design that keeps it closed when not needed or when it’s open, and that’s about it. It’s not the easiest knife in the world to open (it usually takes me both hands to open mine), but what it does, it does very, very well.

opinel_2

The blade is sharp. DANG sharp, and the handle fits comfortable in your hand. If you’re looking for a cheap, everyday utility knife, skip the cheap Chinese imports and go with something that’s been around for a hundred years.

Switching My Daily Carry

Ruger LCP II

At this point, with almost 400 rounds through it with nary a hiccup, I’m confident enough in the LCP II to carry it on days when I have to be more discreet than usual. Also, based on the results from this test and feedback from people whom I know and trust, I’m switching from Hornady 90 grain XTP’s to Hornady 90 grain Critical Defense ammo in my .380’s. The Critical Defense round was the only round to penetrate more than 12 inches of gel AND expand each and every round that was tested.

Look for more rounds downrange with the LCP II in the near future.