Number 9. Number 9. Number 9.

Number 9. Number 9. Number 9.

The first gun I bought for daily carry was a Sccy CPX-1, a knockoff of the Kel-Tec P-11. 

Yeah, I know. The way I see it, though, I was WAY ahead of the pocket 9mm craze. I also bought a P3AT long before the LCP came out. What can I say, I’m a early adopter…

Why did I buy a subcompact 9mm? 

1. Weight. 16 or so rounds of 9mm in a compact pistol weighs more than 11 rounds in a tiny little subcompact. It does’t seem like a whole lot, but after 8+ hours, it begins to add up. 

2. Size. I can sorta pocket carry the Sccy in cargo pants, and it’s very easy to carry in an IWB when I’m wearing jeans. My P-07, while smaller than my full-size CZ75, still needs a SuperTuck in order to be comfortable for daily carry.

3. Oomph. As I said, I have a P3AT, but it is, after all, .380 ACP. Given the choice, I want more rounds of a more powerful cartridge with me. 

As Caleb notes, the subcompact 9mm is to the Wonder Nine what the snub-nosed .38 was to the venerable service revolver. It’s the same manual of arms, and more importantly, it gives you 80% of your big gun at a big savings in weight and size and not that much of a difference in speed or accuracy.

Subcompact nines are the scout rifle of handguns: They’re the CCW gun to have if you can have only one. 

Semper Paratus

Semper Paratus

Put yourself in George Zimmerman’s shoes for a second. You’ve had to use your gun in a situation that you perceived (rightly or wrongly) to be a threat to your life. 

As far as I can tell, Mr. Zimmerman has no firearms training outside what is mandated by the Florida CCW law (if I’m wrong, link it in the comments). More training might have told him that following a suspicious person is a very bad idea if you’re not a cop. More training would have warned hm that it wasn’t his job to detain Treyvon Martin, it was his job to keep his family safe. More training, and Treyvon Martin might  still be alive and George Zimmerman would have his life back. 

I am not advocating compulsory training. I am saying, though, that we practice and practice and practice hitting the bullseye. Maybe a little practice dodging legal bullets would come in handy as well. 

Self-defense insurance costs less than $100 a year. NRA Personal Protection classes cost a bit more, but cover the legal issues of force in some detail. And if that’s not enough, there are firearms schools all over this country that train people how and when to defend their lives. 

Heck, there’s even a website devoted to just to firearms training in Arizona

Get. Trained. The life you save may be someone else’s. 

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Quick Bleg

Quick Bleg

A few months ago, I read an excellent online article on spotting the differences between someone engaged in casual conversation and someone about to commit a violent assault. It was two or three page post or PDF with photos of a “typical” parking lot encounter, with specific tips to look for regarding feet position and nervous glances and was the best resource I’ve found so far to point out what to be on guard for out on the street. 

And, like an idiot, I didn’t bookmark it. 

Has anyone else seen something like this, and if so, can you post a link? 

Thanks.

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Play The Odds

Play the odds

Paul at Safety Solutions Academy makes a very good point. The odds of winning the Mega Millions Lottery this weekend were 1 in 175 million. The odds of becoming a victim of violent crime? Much higher

So why do Americans spend almost $200 per year on lottery tickets and almost zero of personal defense? 

Sure, I bought a Mega Millions ticket. Heck, it was just a buck, less than a bottle of soda these days, and the payoff balanced out hte risk/reward scales rather nicely.

But I also know that a box of practice ammo or a few hours in the dojo would be a better use of my time and money. 

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It Can Happen Here

It can happen here

I agree with WizardPC: What is happening to George Zimmerman could happen to anyone who lawfully carries outside their house. 

One bad decision, one overpowering urge to pursue rather than retreat, one slip-up, and you’re looking at a felony conviction and loss of all your guns at best, and a lynching at worst. 

Is it worth it? Is carrying outside the house just a silly thing for mall-ninja wannabes? 

Of course not. I don’t carry to protect my neighborhood or society as a whole, I carry to protect myself and my loved ones. 

Period full stop. 

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Words To Stay Alive By.

Words to stay alive by.

“One of the greatest unseen dangers we as trained civilians face is the belief that we can drive the event. We think that if we are inside the aggressor(s)’ decision-making loop, we are in control of the situation. And we may be, for a second or so. We need to fix firmly in our minds the sense that the clock is always running! The longer a chaos event runs, the more factors acting on the system, the greater the uncertainty. Our mindset as trained, armed civilians must always be on ending the threat. And to that I would add as quickly as possible. Removing ourselves from the scene ends the threat as certainly as a bullet.” (emphasis in the original)

Michael Bane

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Why Carry… In Church?

Why carry… in church?

I mean, it’s a house of worship. 

A sanctuary. 

A haven of peace for all people. 

Why would ANYONE want to carry a gun for self-protection in such a place? 

Aside from the threat of mass murder, that is. Or armed robbery

It’s almost as if criminals don’t repect the holiness of a place of worship along with all the other laws they are intent on breaking, or something… 

(BTW, the deacon in the second story is the father of a friend of mine).

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Quote Of The Day

Quote of the Day

“It’s starting to seem that a growing number of young adults think group vandalism is an acceptable way to bond.” 

– Editorial opinion of The National Post on Facebook, in response to this story.

Beer bottles, bricks and other debris rained down on police and firefighters in London, Ont., Saturday when St. Patrick’s Day celebrations turned ugly.

London police Chief Bradley Duncan, speaking to reporters Sunday, said he had never seen the level of violence and vandalism that he did Saturday night in his more than three decades on the police force.

“Last night, London experienced the worst case of civil disobedience our community has ever been subjected to,” Duncan said.

He said there was a very real risk that people could have been seriously injured, and even killed, after partygoers turned to setting fires and throwing bottles, stones and two-by-fours at police and firefighters. 

Unlike our cousins in the country formerly known as GREAT Britain, Canadians can still own guns, albeit with some silly (and ultimately useless) restrictions.

I foresee a dramatically huge increase in shotgun ownership in southern Ontario in the near future, with an equally dramatic decrease in youth violence in the areas where legal gun ownership is common. 

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