This Is How We Win.

This Is How We Win.

Three weeks into the new job, and I’m going shooting this weekend at a Shoot N Scoot event with a co-worker who’s gun-curious.

This same weekend, there’ll be a bunch of gun owners stamping their feet and clapping their hands and doing the firearms equivalent of “We’re here, we’re queer, and we’re not going away!” on the steps of the state capitol in Tallahassee.

But do events like that actually change the world?

No, not really. All things like that do is make the people who went to the rally feel like they DID something, but anyone who’s not in earshot of that rally doesn’t really care about YOUR right to keep and bear arms, they care about feeling safe in an unsafe world. Who will help calm that fear, a person screaming at the top of their lungs about “MY RIGHTS!!!,” or calm, cool, collected progressive who wants to make sure that those gun nuts don’t do scary things anymore?

You want to change the world? Change it one person at a time. Rather than make a spectacle of yourself, take someone to the range.

The rights you save may be your own.

Certifiable.

Certifiable.

There was an interesting little tidbit on last week’s “The Remnant” podcast, where Jonah Goldberg interviewed Charlie Cooke. Charlie is the editor of NationalReview.com and is a former subject of Her Majesty who now lives in the U.S. and is also a gun nut.

Why does that seem SO familiar?

In the midst of a discussion about the impact that 3-D printed guns would have on gun manufacturers, Jonah mentioned the impact that Indian casinos have had on Vegas: None at all. What happens is that people who start gambling in a low-rent dive eventually want to take their game (and the experience of playing) to the Nth level, and so that means a trip to Vegas.

Which got me thinking: Why don’t gun companies do more to improve the shooting experience at a gun range? They have a vested interest in getting people out to the range and shooting guns more, so why is the NSSF the only one who certifies ranges as being a cut about average?

Look, I like, nay, LOVE the NSSF, but let’s face it, the average gun owner knows nothing about them other than they’re the ones who toss in an Operation Childsafe pamphlet into the box of their new gun.

What would happen if, say, Glock certified ranges? Or Sig? Would people who own Glocks want to shoot on a range that they knew had the stamp of approval from their favorite brand of gun?

Something to think about.

What We Are Not.

What We Are Not.

I’m not sure if Concealed Nation is trolling us or not here, but this is pretty much everything you don’t want to do if you’re an armed citizen. All that’s missing is a Concealed Carry badge.

The funny thing is, though, that aside from some bad decisions about ammo, handcuffs, holsters and a useless micro cassette recorder, I carry variations of what he carries. Instead of a SIG 229, I carry a Shield. I carry a multitool, and a knife, and a flashlight, and pepper spray.

It’s not WHAT you carry, it’s why you carry it. This gentleman obviously proud of his law enforcement training and sees his role as an armed citizen to be a cop, sans badge.

This is not my role. My role is much more personal. I’m concerned about my health and the health of those dear to me. I’m not carrying a gun to right society’s wrongs, I carry a gun so I can emerged unscathed should bad things happen to me.

Why, it’s almost as if the mission drives the equipment, or something…

Gunwriter’s Blues.*

Gunwriter’s Blues.*

From a comment I left about this article by Tam

I knocked out a review of a compact 9mm earlier this month, just got back from a range session for another 9mm compact and I have yet another 9mm compact being shipped to me as I type this. They are all from 1st-rate, brand name manufacturers and they are all REALLY GOOD GUNS, far better than anything built in the last 500 years.

So how do I come up with a way to say “Um, it’s a gun. A 9mm gun. It shot 250 rounds without a hiccup, and it’ll work just fine for 95%-99% of gun buyers who want something to make them ‘feel safe’ and go to the range with their friends?”

We are in a golden age of guns: Pretty much everything from every major manufacturer (with certain exceptions like the R51 and the like) will do a crackerjack job for the average consumer.

Jeremy Clarkson has said that his car-buying advice these days is just “Get a VW Golf. Want something for your family? Buy an estate or a 5 door Golf. Want something sporty? Buy A GTI,” because a Golf fits the bill for pretty much everyone who is not going to make their car a primary element in their life.

So it is with guns, especially pistols, these days. Glock, Ruger, Beretta, SIG and S&W all make a range of guns from full-size service pistol to tiny little pocket rocket, and every single one of them will be a terrific gun for pretty much anybody. Picking the winners from the losers is getting tougher and tougher because there are so few loser guns these days.

 

* And yes, that title is a Soul Coughing reference.

Colt Competition .45 ACP 1911 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 1001 – 1150

Colt Competition .45 ACP 1911 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 1001 – 1150

I shot another match at Louland with the Colt, and well, pretty much nothing happened except the pistol went BANG and 230 grains of copper and lead went out the barrel.

Boring, I know, right?

The gun did fail go into battery a couple of times, but I am blaming that on me. Thanks to the short slide height of my CZs, I have a bad habit of resting my thumbs on the slide of a pistol as I shoot, and I’m pretty sure that was the cause of my problems. Just to make sure, though, I shot the 40-odd rounds I had leftover the match yesterday, paying particular attention to keeping my thumbs off the slide, and nothing happened except loud noises and holes in the target.

Colt Competition 2000 Round Challenge

Rounds Fired:
150 Rounds Federal Premium American Eagle .45ACP FMJ

Total Rounds Fired To Date:
1150

Results:
No issues.

Thanks again to Lucky Gunner for providing the ammo for this test.

The Enthusiast’s Gun

The Enthusiast’s Gun

“When man becomes preeminent, he is expected to have certain entoosiasms…”

My article on going back to Single Stack is up at Shooting Sports USA, and it really only scratches the surface on my feelings for the 1911.

Is it the most efficient self-defensive gun on the market today? No. Is it an ineffective self-defense firearm? Oh heck no. Is the 1911 a gun that I’d recommend as a starter gun? Also no.

But.

There is just something about the certainty of the click of the safety going off and the crispness of the trigger break and the firm but smooth recoil of the .45ACP in a heavy metal chassis that tells you “Yep, you shot a gun.” The 1911 almost demands that you wax poetic about it, that you understand how it shaped American gun culture and what it has meant to the gun owners that have came before you.

It’s an enthusiast’s gun, but then again, I’m an enthusiastic kinda guy, so it’s a gun that works well for me.

Flash Site Pictures

Flash Site Pictures

Three Concealed Carry Myths Debunked. The Sheriff speaks the truth here. Read it.

What, a guns of the 80’s retrospective WITHOUT the classic Witness Protection shorty 870? For shame! 🙂

Tam does a good job elucidating what you want and don’t want in a carry holster (two guesses which holster shown in that article wasn’t one that she had in mind when she wrote it…). 🙂

Some nice little drills for the indoor range. If you can’t adapt your teaching to work on a “bowling alley” indoor range, you are setting your beginning to intermediate students up to fail.

Lessons from a daytime home invasion. A few years ago, we lived in a neighborhood in Chandler, Arizona that was, um, in transition, and the townhouse next to us had it’s door kicked in and ransacked, while ours wasn’t. Why? We had an external security door on both entrances, and they didn’t.

I really liked the iDryfire and Sharpshot EZ dry fire training apps. You can easily set up a dry fire dojo inside your bedroom or garage for under $100. Just do it.

This is actually a pretty good list of books about America’s gun culture. I see some that I’ve read, and some I need to read.

College students learning about guns. More of this, please.

Flash Site Pictures

Flash Site Pictures

There used to be a time when Wired would be happy about a product that empowers people to fight against tyranny. This is no longer the case.

Related: “Significantly, the government expressly acknowledges that non-automatic firearms up to .50-caliber – including modern semi-auto sporting rifles such as the popular AR-15 and similar firearms – are not inherently military.”
That, my friends, is a huge, huge win, and a knife through the heart of any so-called “assault weapons ban.”

The reality that you are, and always have been your own first responder is starting to seep into the general populace. Good.

Speaking of must-have items, Chuck Haggard has a great article on how and when to spice up somebody’s life with a blast of OC spray.

I’d like to see the .380 added into this test, but if there’s not that much difference between what 9mm does to a target over .45, why carry a lower-capacity .45 instead of a 9mm?

What happens when civility REALLY breaks down and the Communists Democratic Socialists and the fascists National Socialists go at for real? You get years of lead. Read and ask yourself whether this will happen in the United States sometime soon.

I hope it doesn’t.

Clawing Back From The (Media) Abyss

Clawing Back From The (Media) Abyss

Well this looks interesting.

“In a challenge of American craftsmanship, this high-octane competition pits master craftsmen and apprentice duos from rival shops against each other in a head-to-head battle for supremacy.”

I said awhile ago that a gunsmith version of “Forged In Fire” was a no-brainer. Looks like History Channel figured that out as well, and they even brought in Doug Turnbull as one of the judges.

Cool.

Oh, and History is also doing another special on snipers, which is cool, but if they can do that, why not do something on it’s competitive equivalent, the Precision Rifle Series?

Yes, You DO Need To Worry About That Little Guy.

Yes, You DO Need To Worry About That Little Guy.

NRA Instructor QualAs I mentioned earlier, I shot the NRA Instructor Qual with the Colt Competition 1911 that I’m running through a 2000 Round Challenge.

I had (*had*) been doing dry fire up to the day of the test with one of my tricked-out CZ75’s, in anticipation that shooting the qual with a gamer gun that has a wonderful single action trigger would give me a little edge, but seeing how I had a bunch of ammo left over after the Louland match, I went with the 1911 instead to shoot up the extra ammo. I did ok, right up to the point where I had five shots outside of the eight-inch circle at 15 yards, over the maximum of four that the test requires. To make matters worse, that one shot I pulled low and left not only DQ’d me because it was the fifth shot outside the circle, it was outside the six-inch max group size required by the test.

Whoops.

Look, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with the 1911 platform itself: It’s a gun that wins bullseye matches year after year after year, and it wins them because it’s stupid accurate. However, my experience with the 1911 is pretty much limited to the 1000 rounds I have through my test gun, while on the other hand, I passed the 1000 round mark with a CZ75 long before we had smartphones.

Lesson learned.

I’ll shoot the qual again, (probably next week) because I want to get my certs re-upped and start teaching CCW (more on that later) so I’ll shoot it with something I already know how to use accurately, not something I’m learning to shoot.