Let Your Run Be Run And Your Gun Be Gun.

This looks like fun. Exhausting, to be sure, but fun nevertheless.

Dropzone Gunner (DZG) is a once-in-a-lifetime event meant to combine extreme physical conditions along with the ability to operate a variety of weapons. Run, hurdle, jump, shoot. This is a “battlefield pickup” scenario event. All weapons will be staged and ready for you. Yes, we realize you may have a favorite rifle that is worth $10k with $23k worth of extras on it that you would prefer to use. This is not that type of event. You use whatever is in front of you. The art of surprise along with the ability to troubleshoot and manage whatever you come across is vital in this event.

A few things of interest here…

  1. The guns are all staged guns, and they’re all Kel-Tecs. Now we can have the discussion about Kel-Tec quality at another time, but this is a big deal. All guns from one manufacturer? When has that happened before?
  2. I really like the format. Way to appeal The Spartan Race crowd, people!
  3. The prize table is supposedly very, very good, with guns galore and (wait for it) cash as well. FN and SIG may have shut down their teams, but lawd almighty, this looks like a heck of a match.

 

Ruger LCPII 2000 Round Challenge: Rounds 837 – 937

Ruger LCP2 2000 Round Challenge

No photos of the target today, because my phone decided to lock up in the 95° Florida heat. It’s a shame because I concentrated on shooting for groups this time out, and the LCP][ responded with 2″ five-shot groups from 7 yards. Not bad for a little gun with essentially no sights and a very short sight radius.

I finished up the session with 30 or so rounds shot from retention, right up against the target then shooting while backing up as fast as I can, kinda like what Craig Douglas is doing here.

Kinda.

Because I tend to shoot on indoor ranges or at matches, where shooting from retention is rarely mandated, I actually have very little experience with it. Yes, that’s a training scar, and yes, I’m trying to do something about it.

Other than that, the little LCP][ just soldiered on. I was struck again just how easy it is to shoot strong hand only: There really is little for the support hand to do on the gun, and because it’s lightweight with a decent trigger, it really doesn’t need a support hand to get a quick round off and onto the target. I did have one Failure To Feed on round 36 out of 100 while shooting PMC Bronze.

Rounds Fired : 100
70 Rounds PMC Bronze
30 Rounds Winchester FMJ White Box

2000 Round Challenge Results
Total Rounds Fired: 937.
One possible failure to eject on round 116
Failures to eject: Rounds 400 and 489
Failure to feed: Round 873

Conflict Of Interests

First off, kudos to Glock for turning the fifth time they’ve had to update Perfection™ into a major gun event.

It’s a good idea, and a great way to get the fanboys excited for something outrageously innovative, like sights that are actually useful or getting rid of those STUPID finger grooves.

But.

It’s also the same night as the Macgregor-Mayweather fight.

Think that a large part of Glock’s target market is going to more interested in the fight than being the first to shoot a new gun?

Me too.

Update: We have photos of the new gun! It’s, umm, well, a Glock! Without finger grooves! And with a high-tech innovative feature called “an ambidextrous slide release”.

Something that other guns have had for decades prior to this, but now, they’ve perfected it!

Perfect 5th.

Odds And Sods.

I spent a bunch of my ill-botten gooty from the Amazon links on the site and bought a few things to make my life easier. Thanks for your support, everyone, now on to some quick first takes:

SOG Folding Entrenching Tool 

I’ve been needing to get shovels for the back of our family’s cars, so when these came on sale, I snatched up two of them for just just over fifteen bucks.

Not bad.

It’s a basic aluminum entrenching tool, with a twist-lock handle and saw-blade edge and pick on one side and shovel on the other. Nothing fancy, but it’s a tool that infantrymen have been using for decades now, so it should work for us civilians, too.

Gosky Universal Cell Phone Mount

I bought this because I thought it looked cool, and hey, you never know, it may come in handy someday. Because it’s a “universal” mount, however, it’s a little awkward to use with my spotting scope, and it doesn’t work too well with my rifle scopes either because the eye relief is too long.

Image quality from the mount is below par, probably because the optics needed to make a clear image on the back of the eye are different than the optics needed to produce an image on a camera sensor. Still, for just $19, it’s a lot of fun to play around with.

Esbit Folding Stove

I love these little stoves. No, they are not going to cook up a five-course meal for fourteen, but they’ll heat up water for coffee or a freeze-dried instant meal. I’ll have a more in-depth look at this stove when I test it out with this gadget, but for now, I likey.

The Short, Happy Life Of Tactical Timmy*.

Maybe one of the things that makes the SpecOps lifestyle so attractive to we in Gun Culture 2.0 is because they tell really, really good stories, and that’s important to us.

We need heroes. We need to aspire to be something that’s more than we are right now, and let’s face it, there are very few really extraordinary armed civilians out there. Most of them are schlubs like me, and that’s totally cool. I’m not all that extraordinary, and quite honestly, neither or most of my friends.

But Green Berets, MARSOC, Navy SEALS? Them’s extraordinary people who tell extraordinary stories.

Gun Culture 1.0 had extraordinary hunters who went to far-off strange places and turned out some great hunting stories from their exploits.

Is it any wonder, then, that we in Gun Culture 2.0 idolize the men of today who go off to far-off strange places and do extraordinary things in order to keep us safe at home?


* Bonus points if you got the literary reference in the title…

I’m Sucky And I Know It.

45 out of 50. Not too shabby.

Why is the Dot Torture drill so beloved of “serious” (aka “hobbyist”) pistol owners, even though we suck at it so much?

We do it because shooting a Dot Torture drill is a sign that you’re willing to say that “Rather than do the things that I’m good at all day long and tell myself I’m a good shot, I am willing to do a drill that I suck at in order to learn where my weaknesses are.”

To borrow from Tam’s excellent article from earlier this month, THAT’S the difference between a hobbyist and everyone else. A “hobbyist” understands they’re not good at something, and has the willpower, means and lack of ego to get better at it. Most gun owners couldn’t tell you what’s wrong with how they shoot a gun, and they have little desire to improve.

And that’s actually really, really ok, because they are having fun while they shoot, because they shoot for fun. The thing is, though, I don’t really shoot for fun all that much anymore. Pretty much every time I go out to a range now, it’s to shoot a match or test a gun or work on a skill. I’m a hobbyist. It’s what I do.

Now, can we get people to work on a skill while preserving the fun?

Do we even want to?

Formula Firearms

It’s been over a year since I bought a myself a hot hatch, and I really want to learn to drive it better. I know that some kind of auto racing is going to help me with deal with rapid decision making under stress while I’m behind the wheel, and it will help me see a clear course of action while dealing with all the complex inputs that come with driving a car in traffic.

So naturally, the best way for me to do this is is to ditch my car because it’s not good enough and spend a bunch of money on a Rousch Mustang with racing slicks and join the SCCA, right?

Because everyone knows that my lowly family grocery-getter isn’t a serious car for dedicated, hard-core hobbyists. Boy, did I make a mistake buying a car that fit my budget and my needs outside of racing. I shoulda saved up my money and bought something from a dedicated racing brand that the serious gear heads around me approved of, rather than a four-door hatchback from a mass-market manufacturer that also makes delivery trucks and minivans. I should embrace the race car lifestyle and change my life to fit my car, rather than figure out which car fits best with my family and with my desire to drive fast.

What was I thinking?

It’s obvious that I will never, EVER be a serious driver if I don’t get a hardcore sports car. I’m pitiful. I should resign myself to this fact just leave the car in the garage all day. Clearly, driving fast is NOT for me.

Fortunately for me, that’s not what actually happens in the car world. There are events that are set up to let people like me who want to get better learn how to do high-performance driving without emptying our wallets, and I’ll probably go to one within the year, because race car.

Think that this was allegory for getting new gun owners out to a competition or a training class?

You’re right, it was.

Not For Sale: Mossberg 930 SPX Shotgun

Well that was fast: I originally wrote this article over weekend about the 930SPX that I had for sale on Armslist.com. I listed the darn thing on Saturday, and it sold on Sunday, making this post rather redundant.

So instead, just enjoy these pics of a gun I no longer have.

Buy now

Mossberg 930SPX for sale

custom made

What So Funny ‘Bout Peace, Love and Gaming the Crap Out A Stage?

One thing I’ve noticed about the practical shooting sports is that people consider them to be Very Serious Endeavors and Should Not Be Taken Lightly.

I swear, some people look at a pistol bay like it as if it was a church, and we’re not playing  a game, we’re meditating and seeking to unite our souls with the spirit of St. Cooper.

And then we wonder we newcomers seem to feel intimidated when they come to a match.

Why not embrace the gaming element every once in a while? Better still, go full happy fun run and gun in an event that serves as introduction to the sport, and leave the target overlays and rules lawyering for another day.

Simple, easy, lightweight stages with a low round count, lots of steel and no timer are perfect for this. The point isn’t get people thinking about their time, it’s getting people thinking about what they’re doing on a stage, and how much stinkin’ fun it can be to shoot well on a stage. The emphasis shouldn’t be about the score, it should be about the fun.

Everything But The Bang.

One of the biggest differences (if not THE biggest difference) between a Harley rider and every other obnoxious person on two wheels motorcycle rider has little, if anything, to do with the motorcycles themselves. What makes a Harley rider a Harley rider is the mythos that you’re an individualist.

You, and millions and millions of people just like you.

There is a culture that’s built around Harley Davidson owners that has little, if anything, to do with the motorcycles themselves, and it’s a culture that offers events tailored to different levels of engagement into the culture. From “Learn To Ride” events to poker runs to Sturgis, you can find some way to meet your fellow enthusiast and have fun together with your motorcycles.

Is there a culture built around concealed carry? Of course there is.

Are there entry points and events that can handle new gun owners as well as experienced gun owners?

Maybe.

Kathy Jackson turned me on to a new group called Action Shooting International, and I really, really like what they’re doing:

Here at Action Shooting International, LLC, we’re focused on giving you a chance to practice in a way that’s fun, and builds social connections with other gun owners. ASI shoots are competitions, but we’re more concerned about having fun and learning something along the way than fighting for every point. Each shooting problem you’ll face (called a “stage”) focuses on a particular experience or skill — such as reloading, shooting around an obstacle, or shooting while moving.

And the good news is, the rules are lightweight, holsters are optional, .380ACP is the minimum caliber and round counts look to be very low. If you shoot at a range that doesn’t have a competition, this might be right for you to get involved with.