Words To Stay Alive By.

Words to stay alive by.

“One of the greatest unseen dangers we as trained civilians face is the belief that we can drive the event. We think that if we are inside the aggressor(s)’ decision-making loop, we are in control of the situation. And we may be, for a second or so. We need to fix firmly in our minds the sense that the clock is always running! The longer a chaos event runs, the more factors acting on the system, the greater the uncertainty. Our mindset as trained, armed civilians must always be on ending the threat. And to that I would add as quickly as possible. Removing ourselves from the scene ends the threat as certainly as a bullet.” (emphasis in the original)

Michael Bane

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A Drive On The Wild Side

A drive on the wild side

I’m shocked, SHOCKED that this happened in South Phoenix.

Phoenix police are searching for a shooting suspect involved in two attempted carjacking incidents Wednesday morning.

According to police on scene, the incidents occurred around 4:30 a.m. near 16th Street and Southern Avenue. 

Ok, first off, driving in that neighborhood at 4:30 in the morning is a health hazard right up there with heavy smoking, eating bacon and lard sandwiches and watching reality TV. 

But if I did have to drive in that neighborhood, you’re darn tootin’ I’m carrying something for my own protection. 

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Fighting Vs. Self-Defense

Fighting vs. Self-Defense

One of the things that’s been rattling around inside my skull this week is the anti-gunner’s idea that guns = crime and applying that idea to the concept of the two kinds of threats we face. 

To an anti-gunner, a gun is something to be used only in adversarial encounters, when one person decides to establish social dominance over another. They see guns as only being useful in such encounters because a) predators don’t exist in their world or b) if you try to use it to defend against against a predator, they’ll just take it away and use it against you.

This is probably why they also default to penis jokes when faced with the reality that most (if not all) responsible gun owners are calm, collected, cool individuals who aren’t really interested in doing the monkey dance. We don’t really care because we’re beyond worrying about who’s the dominant male. 

To quote Michael Bane (who was quoting someone else), “Why should I be paranoid? I’ve got a gun”. In that same vein, why should I worry about who’s top dog? I’ve got a family to protect and a life to lead.

Another word for this concept is “adulthood”.

I don’t need to overtake you on the freeway / get into a shouting match / pick a fight / whatever because that stuff doesn’t matter to me. To quote someone MUCH smarter than me, “when I became a man, I put away childish things.” 

For the most part, we as a firearms community tend to shy away from people who are worried about who’s the top dog. My home range is also home to Rob Leatham, Nils Johannsen, Angus Hobdell, Vic Pickett and a host of other top-ranked shooters. The competition there is intense and trash-talking sometimes reaches EPIC proportions, but despite that, there’s never any hard feelings at the end of the day. Why? Because the safe use of a firearm DEMANDS an adult mindset. Anything less is dangerous to yourself and others.

Owning and carrying a gun isn’t a sign you want to lord your superiority over the other members of the human herd. Owning and responsibly carrying a gun a sign you’ve left the herd altogether. 

 

Ready For Takeoff

Ready For Takeoff

Air Marshall DrillI wanted to try out my new Blackhawk! mag pouch and the updated SureFire Time app and try another run through the Federal Air Marshall Qualifier

The Drill
All strings are shot from a distance of seven yards. Qualification: Time: Cannot exceed total time for each drill. Example: Drill #1 – 1st time 1.70 seconds, 2nd time 1.55 seconds; Total = 3.25 seconds = Go. Must achieve a “GO” on each drill. Accuracy: Target is FBI “QIT” (bottle). Total rounds fired is 30. Point value inside bottle = 5. Point value touching line or outside bottle = 2. Maximum possible score = 150. Mininum qualifying score = 135. All stages must equal “GO” to qualify. 

And just like my other attempts at this drill, I’m using a USPSA Metric target instead of an FBI QIT target, scoring A’s, B’s and C’s as 5 points and D’s as 2 points.

  

Drill Date 3/4/11 5/26/11 10/7/11 3/7/12
   Par Time Score P Time Score P Time Score P Time Score P
One Round (Twice) 3.3 Seconds Total
Concealed from Holster
1.65 1.92 10 F 1.54 5 p 1.79 5 F 1.60 5 P
1.65 1.82 10 F 1.63 2 p 1.73 5 F 1.52  5 P
Double Tap (twice) 2.70 Seconds Total
Low Ready
1.35 .98 10 P 1.35 10 p 1.26 10 P 1.4 7 P
1.35 1.07 10 P 1.35 10 P 1.72 10 F 0.99 7 P
Rhythm: Fire 6 rounds at one target;
no more than 0.6 second between each shot.
3 Seconds Total Low Ready
3.00 2.62 10 P 3.31 30 F 4.32 30 F 3.02 30 P
One Shot, speed reload, one shot (twice).
6.5 Seconds Total
From low ready
3.25 2.89 10 P 3.85 10 F 4.09 10 F 3.21 7 P
3.25 5.35 10 F 4.25 10 F 3.73 10 F 2.93 10 P
One Round each at two targets three yards apart (Twice).
3.3 Seconds Total Low Ready
1.65 1.35 10 P 1.26 5 F 1.35 10 P 1.64 10 P
1.65 .89 7 F 1.35 4 P 1.2 10 F 1.52 10 P
180° pivot. One round each at three targets (twice). Turn left, then right.
7.0 Seconds Total Concealed From Holster.
3.50 2.84 10 F 2.84 7 P 2.83 15 P 2.72 15 P
3.50 2.75 5 F 4.88 9 P 3.02 15 P 3.50 15 P
One Round, slide locks back; drop to one knee; reload; fire one round. (twice). 8.0 Seconds Total   5.1 10 F 5.25 10 F 6.55 10 F 2.84 10 P
  4.7 10 F 4.25 10 F 6.27 10 F 2.80 10 P
Results     137 F   112 F   150 F   141 P

I passed!

What made the difference? 

1. Practice with my CZ P07. While I didn’t learn a lot of new things during my time at Front Sight, I did put 600+ rounds through the sucker and got in a LOTof practice drawing from concealment. 

2. The new mag pouch made swapping out mags MUCH faster. 

3. I changed up how I dealt with “low ready” to a “compressed high ready” position. I didn’t do this just to get faster on this drill; I’d rather have my gun nice and close to me and in my control rather than out at arm’s length and accessible to all. 

And the SureFire app worked flawlessy on my iPhone 4: It recorded every shot and worked just as it should. Not bad for a free app. 

 

Socially Disordered

Socially Disordered

A while back I talked about what I saw as the two different kinds of threats out there

There are, as I see it, two kinds of violent encounters: Predatorial and Adversarial. The “sudden encounter” is a predator attack, be it mugger, rapist or Rottweiler. Those types of encounter require you to be on your game rightthisveryinstant and respond to the attack with enough force to end things.

The Adversarial attack is road rage or the loudmouth in bar itchin’ for a fight or the jealous spouse of a co-worker or the fight between friends that gets out of hand. Those happen in fairly well-defined patterns and if they get out of hand, they get out of hand in predictable paths that can be countered (or better yet, de-escalated) in predictable ways. 

Ymaa.com has more. 

Generally, violence can be broken down into two very broad categories: social and asocial. Social violence is what, in the natural world, would be the types of violence common within a single species. This intra-species violence does not follow the dynamic or use the same tactics as violence against other species.

The dominance game of snakes wrestling or bears pushing and mouthing is not the same as the way the same species hunt prey. Social violence includes ritualized jockeying for territory or status. It also includes acts to prove or increase group solidarity (a powerful side-effect of hunting as a team) and violence to enforce the rules and mores of the group.

Asocial violence does not target the victim as a person, but as a resource. Asocial violence is the domain of the predator and the humanity of his victim does not enter into the equation. 

Read, as they say, the whole thing.

Twelfth Report

Twelfth Report

So the idea was to take my new mag pouch out to the range today to try it out with my CZ P07 in the Federal Air Marshall Drill. 

I brought the mag poucb. I brought the mags. I brought enough ammo. 

I forgot my gun. 

D’oh! 

So instead, I worked out with my CZ75. 

12th Report

Five Yard Dot Torture Drill – 43 out of 50 
Actually, that’s an improvement from my last attempt at a five yard drill, so I’m cool with this. If (IF) I slowed down a bit while shooting, I could have done even better. 

El Presidenté Drills 


CZ75 1 CZ75 2 CZ75 3
Target One 3C A 2A 2C 4A
Target Two 2A C M 3A C 4A
Target Three 3A C 3A M A 3C

Time 8.38 9.26 9.53
A’s 6 8 9
B’s
C’s 5 3A C 3
D’s
M’s 1 1
Points 35 30 54
Score 4.18 3.24 5.67
Draw 1.88 2.01 1.91
Reload 2.51 2.23 2.51
Avg. Split 0.40 0.49 0.50

On that last run, there was only about a 1/10th of a second difference between my split times for the follow-up shots on the same target and the transition split time for shots on another target. 

Cool. 

What needs improvement? Doing that with a bit more speed. Once I pushed things a bit, the wheels came FLYING off. 

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If I Had A Thousand Dollars…

If I had a thousand dollars…

… I’d buy you a green dress, but not a real green dress, that’s cruel

Jay asks, “What would you recommend a new shooter for a new shooter with $1000?” 

His suggestion of a polymer-framed compact 9mm, a 12 gauge pump action shotgun and a .22 rifle is excellent. 

But. 

It leaves out training. Squeezing in an NRA Basic Pistol or Rifle class into the mix is essential, because we’re not all Rob Leatham and didn’t have the perfect trigger press from the day we were born. So rather than pop $300 for a used Mossberg 500, my sugggestion would be to spend $200 on it’s functional equivalent, the Maverick 88 and buy as many NRA classes as you can. 

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